FTA Title VI Plan

     range: 0 -54% μ 18,078 2,508 705 165 84 5,965 126 65 137 120 3,429 15 0 16 8 57,732 4,289 1,297 1,091 414 28,122 1,633 658 198 36 12,004 1,796 604 478 355 7,323 162 26 64 4 29,560 2,051 610 194 64 12,229 385 58 49 15 11,408 279 98 112 47 9,291 112 53 27 9 15,688 770 178 465 265 39,155 1,879 565 882 256 18,753 482 143 62 45 7,465 86 0 11 0 101,664 26,534 9,948 342 137 21,033 653 53 93 16 16,177 392 73 111 33 9,144 291 153 0 0 424,220 44,443 15,287 4,497 1,908 10.48% 3.60% 1.06% 0.45% 18,116 233 170 119 36 2,803 5,866 28 28 0 0 902 3,379 0 0 26 0 578 57,567 484 277 1,234 125 9,590 28,203 64 0 447 48 5,075 11,959 89 13 150 26 1,924 7,383 4 0 176 28 1,553 29,230 237 95 818 256 4,717 12,412 16 16 104 0 2,150 11,264 8 0 106 0 1,917 9,380 16 0 110 16 1,864 15,889 78 0 136 13 2,236 39,728 112 29 868 245 8,471 18,682 29 3 226 54 5,542 7,360 0 0 25 0 1,266 101,631 2,031 964 1,607 645 14,077 20,999 0 0 588 85 3,893 15,974 58 58 197 60 2,759 9,114 53 0 111 20 1,957 424,136 3,540 1,653 7,048 1,657 73,220 4.83% 2.26% 9.63% 2.26% 17.26% range: 0 -33% μ range: 0 -35% μ range: 0 -11% μ             Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments Board of DirectorsOfficers: Chairman: Neil O'Leary, Waterbury Vice Chairman: Mark Lauretti, Shelton Secretary: Ed Mone, Thomaston Treasurer: Pete Hess, Naugatuck Executive Director: Rick Dunne EEO/DEBELO Officer: Gabriel Filer Financial Director Director of Planning Administrative Staff NVCOG EEO/DBELO Organizational Chart Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments/Valley Transit District Title VI Discrimination and Complaint Form Complaint’s Name: _______________________________________________________________________ Street Address: ___________________________________________________________________________ City/State/Zip: ___________________________________________________________________________ Phone: _____________________________ E-Mail (if available): __________________________________ Title VI Discrimination Complain because of: ____ Race ____ Color ____ National Origin (FHWA complaints only) ____ Disability Please provide the date(s) and location(s) of the alleged discrimination, the name(s) of the individual(s) who allegedly discriminated against you, inc luding their titles (if known). ________________________________________________________________________ ________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________ Please provide the names, addresses and telephone numbers of any witnesses. ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Explain as briefly and as clearly as possible; what happened, how you felt that you were discriminated agains t and who was involved. If applicable, please include how other persons were treated differently from you in the same circumstances. _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ Signature: _____________________________________________ Date: ___________________________ Deliver, mail or e- mail this form to: NVCOG will provide this form to : Mr. Gabriel Filer, Civil R ights Officer Title VI Coordinator, Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments Connecticut Department of Transportation 49 Leavenworth Street, 3rd Floor 2800 Berlin Turnpike Waterbury, Connecticut 06702 Newington, CT 06131- 7546 You may use additional sheets of paper if necessary. Also, please include any written materials pertaining to your complaint. Please contact our office if you need printed materials in another language . Should you have any further questions or want to submit the Title VI Complaint Form you may contact the Civil Rights Officer at gfiler@nvcogct.org or by phone at 203- 757-0535. Title VI Complaint Log No. Date of Complaint Summary of Allegations Status of Investigation Lawsuit or Complaint Action Taken Final Disposition List of Title VI Investigations, Complaints & Lawsuits The Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments maintains a Log of all Title VI Investigations, Complaints and Lawsuits filed against the agency. To date, no investigations, complaints or lawsuits have been filed against the Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments. If an investigation, complaint or lawsuit arises the Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments will immediately notify the Connecticut Department of Transportation’s Office of Contract Complianc e. Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments (NVCOG ) Title VI Compliance Procedures I. NVCOG/FHWA’s Title VI Complaint Process Any person who believes she or he has been discriminated against on the basis of race, color, or national origin by the NVCOG may file a Title VI complaint by completing and submitting the NVCOG Title VI Complaint Form. The FHWA investigates compl aints received no more than 180 days after the alleged incident. A person may also file a complaint directly with the Connecticut Department of Transportation, Office of Contract Compliance, Attn: Title VI Coordinator, 2800 Berlin Turnpike, Newington, CT 06111; or directly with the Federal Highway Administration, at FHWA Office of Civil Rights, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20590. FHWA will process com plaints that are complete and include the following information: • A written explanation of the allege d discriminatory actions; • The complainant’s contact information, including, if available: full name, postal address, phone number, and email address; • The basis of the complaint (e.g., race, color, national origin); • The names of specific persons and respond ents (e.g., agencies/organizations) alleged to have discriminated; • Sufficient information to understand the facts that led the complainant to believe that discrimination occurred in a program or activity that receives Federal financial assistance; and • The date(s) of the alleged discriminatory act(s) and whether the alleged discrimination is on- going. Once the complaint is received, NVCOG will review it and forward it to the CT DOT . There are four potential outcomes for processing complaints: 1.) Accept : if a complaint is filed within 180 days, contains sufficient information to support a claim under Title VI, and concerns matters under FHWA’s jurisdiction, then HCR will send to the complainant, the respondent agency, and the FHWA Division Office a written no tice that it has accepted the complaint for investigation. 2.) Preliminary review : if it is unclear whether the complaint allegations are sufficient to support a claim under Title VI, then HCR may (1) dismiss it or (2) engage in a preliminary review to acquir e additional information from the complainant and/or respondent before deciding whether to accept, dismiss, or refer the complaint. 3.) Procedural Dismissal : if a complaint is not timely filed, is not in writing and signed, or features other procedural/practi cal defects, then HCR will send the complainant, respondent, and FHWA Division Office a written notice that it is dismissing the complaint. 4.) Referral /Dismissal : if the complaint is procedurally sufficient but FHWA (1) lacks jurisdiction over the subject ma tter or (2) lacks jurisdiction over the respondent entity, then HCR will either dismiss the complaint or refer it to another agency that does have jurisdiction. If HCR dismisses the complaint, it will send the complainant, respondent, and FHWA Division Off ice a copy of the written dismissal notice. The FHWA is responsible for conducting all investigations of State DOTs and other primary recipients. II. FHWA ’s Title VI investigation process There are five potential outcomes for concluding an investigation: 1. The FHWA makes a finding of no violation and the case will be closed with no further action. The FHWA will issue an LOF stating in sufficient detail the reasons for the determination of no violation. 2. If, by a preponderance of the evidence, FHWA determine s the respondent has failed to comply with its Title VI requirements or threatens to fail to comply by action or inaction, then FHWA will inform the respondent and the matter will be resolved by informal means whenever possible. o If FHWA informally resolve s the matter with the respondent by agreement, then FHWA will hold the complaint in abeyance until the respondent completes its corrective actions. If the corrective actions are completed to the FHWA’s satisfaction, then the complaint will be dismissed with no further action. o If FHWA cannot informally resolve the matter or the respondent does not complete agreed upon corrective actions, then FHWA may issue a LOF stating that the Recipient is in noncompliance with its Title VI obligations. 3. If FHWA issues a LOF of noncompliance to the respondent, the LOF will request that the respondent provide to FHWA, within 90 days, an action plan that implements the recommendations in the LOF. 4. If FHWA approves the action plan, then the respondent will be given a reasonable amount of time to implement the plan. At the end of the implementation period, FHWA will assess whether the respondent has sufficiently corrected the deficiencies. 5. If FHWA does not approve the action plan, or the respondent is nonresponsive/unc ooperative, then FHWA may seek administrative sanctions, including, but not limited to, suspension or termination of Federal funds or any other means authorized by law such as referral to USDOJ for enforcement. o If USDOT seeks to suspend or terminate funds , it must provide the respondent with an opportunity for a hearing on the record. If the Secretary of Transportation determines that the respondent has not complied with Title VI and voluntary compliance cannot be secured, USDOT must notify Congress before that finding goes into effect. 49 CFR All LOFs issued by F HWA are administratively final.

Política de relaciones con el público

Pol?tica de relaciones con el p  blico Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments Comit? ejecutivo  Neil O’Leary, Mayor, Waterbury ? Chairman  Mark Lauretti, Mayor, Shelton ? Vice Chairman  Ken Cockayne, Mayor, Bristol ? Secretary  Tom Dunn, Mayor, Wolcott ? Treasurer  Leonard Assard, First Selectman, Bethlehem  Chris Bielik, First Selectman, Beacon Falls  Kurt Miller, First Selectman, Seymour  Ed Mone, First Selectman, Thomaston Personal  Rick Dunne, Executive Director  Mark C. Nielsen, Director of Planning  William Leverence, Finance Director  Trish Bauer, Oce & Financial Manager  Arthur Bogen, Brownelds Consultant  Aaron Budris, Senior Regional Planner  Max Tanguay-Colucci, Regional Planner  John DiCarlo, Municipal Shared Services Coordinator  Christian Meyer, Supervising Transportation Planner  Benjamin Muller, Transportation Planner*  Mark Pandol, Transit Capital Administrator  Glenda Prentiss, GIS Program Coordinator  Lauren Rizzo, Administrative Assistant  Joanna Rogalski, Regional Planner / Emergency Management*  Karen Svetz, P.E., Regional Transportation Engineer * indica autores principales Fuentes de copias  Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments 49 Leavenworth Street, 3rd Floor Waterbury, CT 06702  tel?fono: (203) 757-0535  e-mail: nvcogct@nvcogct.org  sitio Web: www.nvcogct.org Expresiones de gratitud  Todos los mapas y fotos por parte del personal NVCOG  Iconos de Icon Fair a The Noun Project  Traducciones de Maria Jose Pastor y personal NVCOG EN Translations available by request. ES Traducciones disponibles bajo petici?n. IT Traduzioni disponibili su richiesta. PL Tumaczenia dostpne na zam?wienie. PT Tradu??es dispon?veis mediante solicita – ??o. SQ P?rkthime n? dispozicion me k?rkes?. ZH |?}F?~???~ ??  1 Declaraci?n de misi?n L a meta del NVCOG es de integrar plenamente a los residentes y las partes interesadas en identicar las prioridades de la planicaci?n, desarrollar proyectos y programas y publicar los productos nales. En particular, la meta del NVCOG es de asegurarse que la poblaci?n desfavorecida tenga acceso signicativo a participar en el proceso de la planicaci?n y toma de decisiones pol?ticas en nuestra regi?n de planicaci?n. Qui?nes somos El Consejo de Gobiernos del Valle de Naugatuck (NVCOG) es un consejo de gobiernos regional (COG) compuesto por diecinueve (19) ciudades y pueblos en la zona central occidental de Connecticut. El NVCOG tambi?n es agencia acogedora de la Metropolitan Planning Organization [ Organizaci?n de Planicaci?n Metropolitana] (MPO), la Greater Waterbury Urbanized Area [ zona metropolitana urbanizada de Waterbury ] (UZA) y es socio de la Greater Bridgeport and Valley MPO [ zona metropolitana de Bridgeport y el Valle ]. El NVCOG trabaja de cerca con otras agencias federales, estatales y locales para facilitar la cooperaci?n entre sus diecinueve municipalidades miembros sobre la pol?tica y los problemas del transporte p?bico, el medio ambiente, la econom?a, y el desarrollo. Como agencia acogedora el rol del NVCOG y MPO es de asegurarse de que el p?blico tenga oportunidades signicativas para participar en las varias etapas de la planicaci?n y el proceso de toma de decisiones de las pol?ticas. Las aportaciones valiosas del p?blico ayudan a asegurar que los proyectos y fondos se distribuyan equitativamente. El NVCOG est? enteramente cometido a integrar a los residentes y las partes interesadas en todas las etapas del proceso de planicaci?n para aprender sobre los deseos y necesidades del publico referte al transporte p?blico y el desarrollo. Este documento detallar? el proceso de la participaci?n y envolvimiento p?bico, proporcionando orientaci?n sobre el acercamiento p?blico y los est?ndares para el personal del NVCOG y los ciudadanos envueltos. El acercamiento p?blico est? dise?ado como un circuito de retroalimentaci?n, en el que el p?blico est? envuelto en cada paso de la planicaci?n y cada oportunidad de envolvimiento p?blico alimenta el pr?ximo paso de la toma de decisiones. Mediante este circuito de retroalimentaci?n, el NVCOG espera fomentar una relaci?n de colaboraci?n frente a la planicaci?n con los residentes y trabajadores de la regi?n del NVCOG. Introducci?n 2 Consejo de gobiernos (COG) El rol del NVCOG como consejo de gobiernos (o consejo) est? denido por los Estatutos Generales de Connecticut cap?tulo 50 ? 4-124i al ? 4-124u. El cuerpo de toma de decisiones del NVCOG es su Consejo de Funcionarios Titulares Electos (CEOs) de cada municipalidad, o miembro, de la regi?n de planicaci?n. Las estructuras gobernando la toma de decisiones del Consejo est?n denidas por los estatutos de la organizaci?n. El Consejo supervisa las cuestiones de la planicaci?n regional y la colaboraci?n de servicios municipales, a incluir las prioridades del transporte p?blico de las regiones MPO vecinas (pr?xima secci?n). Como consejo de gobiernos, la responsabilidad principal del NVCOG es la redacci?n de un documento de planicaci?n regional denominado Regional Plan of Conservation and Development (POCD). El POCD regional hace recomendaciones y le informa al POCD estatal en cuanto a ?el uso de la tierra, la vivienda, las autopistas y carreteras principales, los puentes, los aeropuertos, los parques, los parques infantiles, las ?reas de recreo, las escuelas, las instituciones p?blicas, los servicios p?blicos, la agricultura y otras cuestiones que ser?n beneciosas para el ?rea.? (Estatutos Generales de Connecticut cap?tulo 127 ? 8-35a). Las normas del acercamiento p?blico durante el proceso de redacci?n de los POCD tambi?n est?n denidos en este mismo estatuto. METROPOLITAN SOUTH CENTRAL NORTHEASTERN SOUTHEASTERN CAPITOL REGION New London Windsor Locks Ansonia Beacon Falls Derby West Haven Wethers- field Thomaston Plainville East Haven New Britain Old Saybrook Middle- field Newing- ton Deep River Cromwell Rocky Hill East Granby North Canaan East Hartford Bridge- water West- brook Naugatuck Sprague Bridge- port Prospect Wood- bridge Seymour New Haven West Hartford Middle- bury North Haven New Canaan Essex Darien Andover Bethlehem North Branford Marl- borough Ne w Fairfield South Windsor Brookfield East Windsor Scot- land Strat- ford Hartford Bolton Westport Clinton Columbia Plymouth Lisbon Franklin Chaplin Bloomfield Sherman Old Lyme Weston Trumbull East Hampton Norwalk Hampton Watertown Southington Killing- worth Milford East Lyme Eastford Willington Sterling Cheshire Middletown Voluntown Hamden Stamford Madison Chester Orange Vernon Manchester Bethel Branford Bethany Putnam Farmington Wolcott Bozrah Morri s Waterbury Meriden Durham Portland Windham New Hartford Barkhamsted Burlington Winchester Roxbury Harwinton Colebrook Brooklyn Canton Washington Monroe North Stonington Ridgefield Norwich Waterford Somers Warren Woodbury Simsbury Wallingford Canterbury Windsor Fairfield Stonington Redding Easton Southbury Ellington Torrington Hartland Preston Bristol Shelton Canaan Wilton Avon Griswold Coventry East Haddam Berlin Salem Glastonbury Groton Greenwi ch Thompson Colchester Plainfield Oxford Union Mansfield Enfield Ledyard Hebron Montville Ashford Pomfret Danbury Cornwall Tolland Haddam Granby New Milford Suffield Goshen Woodstock Lyme Guilford Lebanon Norfolk Newtown Killingly Litchfield Salisbury Stafford Sharon Kent NAUGATUCK VALLEY WESTERN NORTHWEST HILLS LOWER CONNECTICUT RIVER VALLEY I 010205 Miles Source: OPM, State of Connecticut, U.S. Census Bureau 2010 Map 1: Councils of Government in Connecticut NVCOG Members  Ansonia  Beacon Falls  Bethlehem  Bristol  Cheshire  Derby  Middlebury  Naugatuck  Oxford  Plymouth  Prospect  Seymour  Shelton  Southbury  Thomaston  Waterbury  Watertown  Wolcott  Woodbury 3 3 Organizaciones metropolitanas de planicaci?n (MPO) Como agencia acogedora de una organizaci?n metropolitana de planicaci?n (MPO), el NVCOG funciona como el Central Naugatuck Valley MPO y colabora con el Greater Bridgeport and Valley MPO en los procesos de la planicaci?n del transporte p?blico regional y los programas de mejoras a la infraestructura para las dos regiones de las antemencionadas MPOs. Las MPOs est?n autorizadas por las normas federales, organizadas por municipalidades como regiones y designadas por el gobernador. Las MPOs realizan la planicaci?n del transporte p?blico y apoyan el programa de mejoras al transporte p?blico a nombre de sus comunidades constituyentes. El NVCOG ?nicamente acoge el Central Naugatuck Valley MPO (CNVMPO) y como tal todas las actividades del CNVMPO han de conformarse a esta pol?tica de participaci?n p?blica. El CNVMPO comparte las responsabilidades de acogimiento con MetroCOG y RPO de la zona metropolitana de Bridgeport, de 4 municipalidades miembros en el Greater Bridgeport and Valley MPO: Ansonia, Derby, Seymour y Shelton. Las actividades del NVCOG que incorporan estas cuatro municipalidades han de conformarse a la pol?tica de participaci?n p?blica, pero las actividades relacionadas a la MPO en estas cuatro municipalidades han de conformarse a ambos el GBVMPO Public Participation Plan y esta pol?tica, imponiendo los requisitos m?s estrictos en caso de un conicto. METROPOLITAN SOUTH CENTRAL NORTHEASTERN SOUTHEASTERN CAPITOL REGION New London Windsor Locks Ansonia Beacon Falls Derby West Haven Wethers- field Thomaston Plainville East Haven New Britain Old Saybrook Middle- field Newing- ton Deep River Cromwell Rocky Hill East Granby North Canaan East Hartford Bridge- water West- brook Naugatuck Sprague Bridge- port Prospect Wood- bridge Seymour New Haven West Hartford Middle- bury North Haven New Canaan Essex Darien Andover Bethlehem North Branford Marl- borough Ne w Fairfield South Windsor Brookfield East Windsor Scot- land Strat- ford Hartford Bolton Westport Clinton Columbia Plymouth Lisbon Franklin Chaplin Bloomfield Sherman Old Lyme Weston Trumbull East Hampton Norwalk Hampton Watertown Southington Killing- worth Milford East Lyme Eastford Willington Sterling Cheshire Middletown Voluntown Hamden Stamford Madison Chester Orange Vernon Manchester Bethel Branford Bethany Putnam Farmington Wolcott Bozrah Morri s Waterbury Meriden Durham Portland Windham New Hartford Barkhamsted Burlington Winchester Roxbury Harwinton Colebrook Brooklyn Canton Washington Monroe North Stonington Ridgefield Norwich Waterford Somers Warren Woodbury Simsbury Wallingford Canterbury Windsor Fairfield Stonington Redding Easton Southbury Ellington Torrington Hartland Preston Bristol Shelton Canaan Wilton Avon Griswold Coventry East Haddam Berlin Salem Glastonbury Groton Greenwi ch Thompson Colchester Plainfield Oxford Union Mansfield Enfield Ledyard Hebron Montville Ashford Pomfret Danbury Cornwall Tolland Haddam Granby New Milford Suffield Goshen Woodstock Lyme Guilford Lebanon Norfolk Newtown Killingly Litchfield Salisbury Stafford Sharon Kent NAUGATUCK VALLEY WESTERN NORTHWEST HILLS LOWER CONNECTICUT RIVER VALLEY I 010205 Miles Source: OPM, State of Connecticut, U.S. Census Bureau 2010 COG Boundaries MPO Boundaries Municipalities URBANIZED AREAS (CENSUS 2010) Bridgeport-Stamford, CT/NY Danbury, CT/NY Hartford, CT New Haven, CT Norwich-New London, CT/RI Springfield, MA/CT Waterbury, CT Worcester, MA/CT Urban Clusters Map 2: MPOs and Urbanized Areas in Connecticut CNVMPO Members  Beacon Falls  Bethlehem  Bristol  Cheshire  Middlebury  Naugatuck  Oxford  Plymouth  Prospect  Southbury  Thomaston  Waterbury  Watertown  Wolcott  Woodbury GBVMPO Members  Ansonia  Derby  Seymour  Shelton 4 ?rea en incumplimiento de la calidad del aire Ya que ambos MPOs quedan en un ?rea en incumplimiento de la calidad del aire, relativo a ambos el material particulado 2,5 (2006) y el ozono (2008), el NVCOG tambi?n ha de incluir el acercamiento p?blico al designar la conformidad de la calidad del aire en cuanto a los planes del transporte p?blico y los TIPs. Los derechos civiles El NVCOG se dedica a buscar y considerar las necesidades de las poblaciones desfavorecidas. Nuestra agencia ha trabajado para identicar ?reas geogr?cas con comunidades de justicia ambiental bajo el T?tulo VI, justicia ambiental, y normas del ADA. T?tulo VI, acceso ling??stico y JA El T?tulo VI de la ley de los derechos civiles proh?be la exclusi?n de la participaci?n en, negaci?n de prestaciones, y discriminaci?n bajo los programas nanciados por el gobierno federal por raz?n de la raza, color, u origen nacional. El NVCOG trabaja para asegurarse de que todos los programas y proyectos est?n en conformidad con la letra y el esp?ritu del T?tulo VI, independiente de si el programa es de asistencia federal o estatal. El NVCOG tambi?n trabaja para proporcionarles a las poblaciones de dominio limitado del ingl?s (LEP) en nuestra regi?n de planicaci?n con acceso signicativo a las actividades de la planicaci?n. Espec?camente, existen poblaciones LEP de habla hispano y polaco en toda la regio. Los LEP de habla hispana se identican principalmente con puertorrique?os. Dado que el NVCOG tambi?n opera el presupuesto capital para el Valley Transit District la agencia tiene responsabilidades adicionales bajo la Federal Transit Administration (FTA), de proporcionar acceso ling??stico (orden ejecuta 13166). Para m?s detalles sobre el proceso del t?tulo VI de la agencia, y la informaci?n relativa al acceso ling??stico vea el Title VI Program Plan . Adem?s de las responsabilidades del t?tulo VI, el NVCOG est? cometido a apoyar la justicia ambiental (JA) en sus actividades de planicaci?n, seg?n detalladas por la orden ejecutiva 12898. Para este n, el NVCOG ha identicado lugares dentro de la regi?n de planicaci?n donde viven las poblaciones metas, y con regularidad investiga los impactos de la planicaci?n del NVCOG en estas poblaciones. Para m?s detalles sobre el programa de justicia ambiental del NVCOG, vea el Environmental Justice Policy . La edad y la discapacidad El NVCOG est? cometido a asegurarse que los residentes de todas las edades y niveles de capacidad tengan acceso a nuestro acercamiento p?bico. Para este n, el NCVOG ha identicado la ubicaci?n de poblaciones de la tercera edad (65+) en la regi?n, y trabaja para asegurarse que todas las sesiones p?blicas y los documentos de las mismas est?n disponibles en lugares y formatos accesibles. Las quejas Cuando el NVCOG recibe quejas del p?blico referente a las pol?ticas, decisiones sobre la planicaci?n, proyectos en curso, o semejantes, a nivel municipal o regional, el rastreo y la respuesta son esenciales. Algunos temas, tales como los acomodos seg?n el ADA y quejas sobre una posible discriminaci?n, por estatuto se requiere que sean rastreadas y afrontadas de una forma espec?ca. Manteniendo un p roceso para rastrear y abordar las quejas asegurar? que estos requisitos legales se cumplan y que el NVCOG est? haciendo lo mejor para servir al p?blico. Toda queja recibida por el personal del NVCOG se ha de registrar, incluyendo la fecha y hora de la misma, en una hoja de c?lculos en nuestros servidores internos. Las quejas se pueden enviar inmediatamente a la persona indicada dentro del NVCOG, incluyendo el funcionario designado de los derechos civiles. Se ha de responder a toda queja recibida por el NVCOG dentro de 10 d?as laborales por la persona indicada. Si la queja es sobre actividades de planicaci?n fuera de la jurisdicci?n del NVCOG, el denunciante ha de ser informado de una v?a m?s apropiada para presentar su queja. Cuando sea apropiado, el personal del NVCOG deber?a enviar las quejas a otras ocinas regionales o locales para el proceso especico relativo las quejas al ADA o t?tulo VI, por favor vea las pol?ticas pertinentes en el sitio Web del NVCOG ( www. nvcogct.org ). 5 El NVCOG cree que el p?blico ha de estar integrado frecuente y signicativamente en el proceso de la planicaci?n y desarrollo de proyectos. Las siguientes directrices de acercamiento p?blico est ?n modeladas en un formato de un ?circuito? continuo de aportaciones, en el que el NVCOG pide aportaciones del p?blico, incorpora estas aportaciones al plan, y pide m?s aportaciones. De la misma manera, el p?blico puede pedirle informaci?n al NVCOG y dar sus aportaciones pertinentes a sus proyectos de planicaci?n. Advertencia En caso las regulaciones federales, estatales u otras prescriben requisitos de la participaci?n p?blica m?s espec?cos o comprensivos que las pol?ticas del NVCOG, dichos requisitos sustituir?n las pol?ticas de participaci?n p?blica descritas a continuaci?n. M?s, si los requisitos de la participaci?n p?blica fueran a cambiar y por dicho cambio llegar a ser m?s espec?cos y comprensivos, invalidar?n las pol?ticas del NVCOG. Cuando dichas incongruencias fueran a salir a relucir, es la responsabilidad del personal del NVCOG considerar si es necesario actualizar este documento para mejor servir la poblaci?n de la regi?n. Identicando las prioridades Recopilando la opini?n p?blica Publicando los planes y documentos Lazo de la participaci?n 6 Identicando las prioridades El mantener un acercamiento p?blico continuo y signicativo puede animar la participaci?n en el proceso de la planicaci?n a largo plazo, y es esencial para asegurase de que el trabajo del NVCOG tome en cuenta las necesidades y los deseos de los residentes al desarrollar y priorizar los proyectos de planicaci?n. Para facilitar dichas interacciones, se resumen a continuaci?n las siguientes pol?ticas gobernando el d?a a d?a y otra comunicaci?n. Disponibilidad del personal El personal del NVCOG est? disponible al p?blico durante el horario laborable, 8:30am ? 4:30pm, en las ocinas del NVCOG en el centro de Waterbury. El personal tambi?n est? disponible por tel?fono o correo electr?nico durante estas mismas horas. Cualquier comentario o queja inmediata se puede hacer directamente con el personal del NVCOG, suponiendo que el personal indicado est ? en la ocina y disponible. Cuando posible, el pedir una reuni?n con un miembro del personal asegurar? que ?ste estar? disponible para escuchar, aprender de y responder al p?blico. La junta directiva del NVCOG Los directores de la junta directiva del NVCOG dirige los programas y las pol?ticas del NVCOG y como tal dispone de unas normas especiales en cuanto a la noticaci?n y acceso al p?blico. Estas normas se encuentran en los estatutos, disponibles en el sitio Web del NVCOG ( www.nvcogct.og ). Copias impresas de estas normas tambi?n est?n disponibles por correo al enviar su solicitud al: 49 Leavenworth Street,3rd Floor Waterbury, CT 06702 (203) 757-0535, nvcogct@nvcogct.org Listas de correos y mantenimiento El NVCOG ha establecido una lista de correos de distribuci?n para nes del acercamiento p?blico por medio de MailChimp, un servicio de distribuci?n basado en Internet. Esta lista de correos estar? disponible al p?blico para suscribirse para recibir correos electr?nicos peri?dicos con actualizaciones sobre las actividades y eventos de la agencia. Los usuarios de la lista de correos tambi?n pueden darse de baja de la misma a su antojo. El personal del NVCOG monitorea la participaci?n en las listas de correos y crea listas por tema espec?co para una distribuci?n m?s dirigida, seg?n se necesite. La lista de correos general puede ser usada para distribuir el bolet?n informativo peri?dico describiendo reuniones p?blicas, fechas de reuniones y eventos importantes futuros o documentos del plan recientemente publicados. La frecuencia y el contenido del bolet?n informativo queda a la discreci?n del personal del NVCOG. M ?s, puede que algunos proyectos espec?cos generen sus propias listas de correos. Cuando posible, estas listas de tema espec?co se han de elaborar usando el mismo servicio que las listas de correo generales de acercamiento p?blico para as? con m?s facilidad combinar la lista del proyecto con la lista general de acercamiento p?blico una vez terminado el proyecto. El pie de los correos de la lista de proyecto espec?co ha de incluir un enlace para suscribirse o darse de baja de la lista de correos general de acercamiento p?blico. Las redes sociales El NVCOG mantiene una presencia en las redes sociales en Facebook. La principal raz?n por la p?gina Facebook del NVCOG es para mantener una relaci?n con el p?blico. Todo personal del NVCOG a 7 tiempo completo goza del privilegio de publicar en Facebook y se le anima a que publique contenido informativo sobre las actividades de la agencia y tendencias m?s amplias de la planicaci?n. Las publicaciones no han de estar relacionadas directamente con las actividades de planicaci?n o proyectos del NVCOG. El NVCOG se reserva el derecho de borrar comentarios que amenazan contra la seguridad de individuos o grupos, son ataques personales, divulgan informaci?n personal, o son de alguna forma u otra inapropiados. Las quejas y comentarios p?blicos presentados mediante las redes sociales ser?n registrados, rastreados y abordados siguiendo el procedimiento de quejas descrito en la p?gina 4. El calendarioio en Internet y pol?ticas noticieras El sitio Web del NVCOG es otro medio de comunicaci?n entre el NVCOG y el p?blico. El sitio sirve como archivo de todos los documentos relativos a la pol?tica y planicaci?n creados por y para el NVCOG, y publica un calendarioio organizacional de eventos y noticias, ambos se ven en la p?gina principal. El calendario organizacional se actualizar? con todas las reuniones abiertas al p?blico, incluyendo las reuniones de la junta directiva del NVCOG, La comisi?n regional de planicaci?n (RPC), MPOs y los comit?s ciudadanos de asesoramiento. El calendarioio organizacional se ha incorporado a las directrices de noticaci?n al p?blico para todas las reuniones p?blicas. La transmisi?n de noticias de la Web se ha de actualizar peri?dicamente con todas las publicaciones en estado borrador y nal, al igual que cualquier evento especial u honores tales como la concesi?n de una beca. Comit?s ciudadanos de asesoramiento Los comit?s de ciudadanos de asesoramiento son comit?s permanentes de ciudadanos formados para considerar un tema, proyecto o plan en particular de inter?s regional. Su funci?n y membres?a depende de las necesidades de la junta directiva, las aportaciones p?blicas y plazos de planicaci?n de los proyectos. Los comit?s de asesoramiento son de utilidad para desarrollar una perspectiva organizacional coordinada a largo plazo sobre ciertos asuntos en particular, y para obtener las aportaciones de los expertos y defensores pertinentes en las actividades de planicaci?n. El constituir un comit? ciudadano de asesoramiento podr?a ayudar a identicar nuevas prioridades o necesidades regionales. En lo que estos comit?s son muy ecaces en identicar prioridades y obtener las aportaciones de los ciudadanos y expertos de la comunidad, su facilitaci?n puede que requiera de mucho tiempo del personal del NVCOG. El costo de mantener estos comit?s se ha de sopesar con su relevancia. Se pueden disolver los comit?s ciudadanos de asesoramiento y constituir de nuevo seg?n se necesiten, o se pueden constituir con el entendimiento que se disolver?n una vez se haya realizado por completo un proyecto o plan de planicaci?n. El NVCOG ha desarrollado las siguientes pol?ticas regulando la naturaleza p?blica de los comit?s ciudadanos de asesoramiento (CAC): 1. Ning?n CAC tiene poderes de tomar decisiones, salvo que el NVCOG se lo hayo delegado espec?camente. 2. Todas las reuniones de los COCs est?n abiertas al p?blico, y ser?n programadas, ubicadas y anunciadas conforme a las siguientes pol?ticas: a. Una noticaci?n p?blica de la reuni?n se har? siete (7) d?as antes del d?a de la reuni?n. 8 Las noticaciones han de incluir el lugar, la hora y el orden del d?a propuesto. b. Cuando sea razonable, se adoptar? una serie de reuniones ordinarias y las fechas de las reuniones del a?o se publicar?n en la p?gina Web del comit?. c. Las minutas o el resumen de la reuni?n se publicar?n en el sitio Web del comit? dentro de setenta y dos horas (72) de la reuni?n. d. Las reuniones se convocar?n en un lugar accesible mediante el transporte p?blico y cumpliendo con las normativas del ADA. Los servicios de int?rpretes se ofrecer?n con tres d?as (3) de noticaci?n previa. i. Una nota de esta accesibilidad se har? p?blico en la noticaci?n de la reuni?n. 2. Los comit?s se pueden constituir o disolver seg?n el juicio del director ejecutivo salvo que se haya indicado lo contrario. La comisi?n regional de planicaci?n (RPC) La RPC es un comit? ciudadano de asesoramiento cuya membres?a y responsabilidades est?n detalladas en los estatutos del NVCOG. La RPC solo puede ser disuelto mediante un voto de la junta directiva del NVCOG. 10 Recopilando la opini?n p?blica La integraci?n signicativa del p?blico ayuda al personal del NVCOG recopilar la opini?n publica en las ediciones borrador y nal de los documentos de a la planicaci?n y pol?tica. Los documentos de la planicaci?n y pol?tica publicados por el NVCOG var?an en alcance desde revisiones menores a las pol?ticas hasta planes maestros de gran amplitud que guiar?n las inversiones y la pol?tica durante a?os. El NVCOG ha desarrollado un proceso escalonado para la integraci?n del p?blico para abordar esta gama. Los siguientes escalones se usar?n al dise?ar el proceso de integraci?n p?blica. Proyectos mayores Este escal?n est? compuesto por documentos de gran alcance con gran impacto en la pol?tica y programaci?n a lo largo de varios a?os. Muchos de estos documentos contienen requisitos espec?cos sobre la participaci?n p?blica. Dada la importancia de este escal?n, varios productos obligatorios se mencionan espec?camente (vea la p?gina 9). Este escal?n tambi?n incluye los proyectos supervisados por la agencia a gran escala; las autopistas y el transporte p?blico en v?as de dise?o o bajo construcci?n. Proyectos menores Este escal?n est? compuesto por publicaciones o estudios menores no sujetos al estatuto bajo Tareas 2 y 3 del Programas de trabajo de planicaci?n unicado (UPWP, el programa de todas las actividades del MPO a ser llevadas a cabo por el personal del NVCOG durante el transcurso del t?rmino del proyecto), y actualizaciones amplias en intervalos a los documentos de pol?tica que no cambian de forma sustancial la pol?tica en s?. Asuntos ordinarios Este escal?n es para las reuniones ordinarias y anuncios y actualizaciones menores a los planes o la pol?tica. Este escal?n puede ser una v?a para comunicar novedades pertinentes locales, estatales o nacionales de galardones u oportunidades de becas. 11 Planes para el transporte p?blico a largo plaza (LRTP) Sesiones p?blicas Sesiones informativas Noticia p?blica Comentarios 2 Seg?n sea necesario anuncio, calendario, lista de correo, copias a los municipios, comunicado de prensa, las redes sociales, el sitio Web 45 d?as Programas de mejoras del transporte (TIP) Sesiones p?blicas Sesiones informativas Noticia p?blica Comentarios 1 Seg?n sea necesario anuncio, calendario, lista de correo, comunicado de prensa, las redes sociales, el sitio Web 45 d?as Programas de trabajo de planicaci?n unicado (UPWP) Sesiones p?blicas Sesiones informativas Noticia p?blica Comentarios 1 Seg?n sea necesario calendario, lista de correo, comunicado de prensa, las redes sociales 30 d?as El plan regional para la conservaci?n y desarrollo (POCD) Sesiones p?blicas Sesiones informativas Noticia p?blica Comentarios 2 Seg?n sea necesario anuncio, calendario, lista de correo, copias a los municipios, comunicado de prensa, las redes sociales, el sitio Web 65 d?as Otro proyectos mayores Sesiones p?blicas Sesiones informativas Noticia p?blica Comentarios 1 Seg?n sea necesario el bolet?n , calendario, lista de correo, comunicado de prensa, las redes sociales, el sitio Web 45 d?as Proyectos menores Sesiones p?blicas Sesiones informativas Noticia p?blica Comentarios 0 1+ aviso legal, el bolet?n , las redes sociales 30 d?as Asuntos ordinarios Sesiones p?blicas Sesiones informativas Noticia p?blica Comentarios 0 0+ calendario, el bolet?n , las redes sociales 30 d?as si necesario 12 Sesiones p?blicas Para ciertos proyectos existe la obligaci?n por estatuto de convocar sesiones p?blicas donde se pueden hacer presentaciones y se pueden dejar en constancia los comentarios p?blicos. El NVCOG exige que se convoquen sesiones p?blicas para todos los proyectos importantes. Las sesiones p?bicas han de acatarse a las siguientes normas:  Convocadas en lugares y a horas convenientes y accesibles  Noticaci?n de la sesi?n p?blica con al menos una semana de antelaci?n  En un peri?dico de gran tirada en la zona afectada, preferiblemente mediante un anuncio  Mediante la lista de correos o la lista de correos espec?ca, seg?n sea apropiado  Incluir el nombre, tel?fono y correo electr?nico de la persona de contacto  En un lugar accesible  Servicios de interpretaci?n/ traducci?n y por se?as a petici?n o por omisi?n  Las minutas grabadas y transcritas  Los comentarios del comentarista grabados por nombre y agencia, si correspondiera Las sesiones p?blicas han de explicar la siguiente informaci?n, como m?nimo:  El prop?sito y necesidad del proyecto y ser coherentes con las metas y objetivos de cualquier planicaci?n urbana local;  Las alternativas al proyecto y caracter?sticas de dise?o m?s importantes;  El impacto social, econ?mico, ambiental u otros del proyecto; y  El programa de ayuda de reubicaci?n y el proceso de la adquisici?n de derecho al paso  El procedimiento usado por la agencia para recibir comentarios verbales y por escrito del p?blico. Adem?s de los ante enumerados requisitos, los proyectos importantes han de ser coherentes con las normas de la sesi?n p?blica de la autoridad nanciadora correspondiente (FHWA, FTA, etc.) Sesiones informativas Las sesiones informativas son eventos de acercamiento p?blico menos formales dise?adas para informar a la comunidad y las partes interesadas pertinentes y pedir aportaciones sobre los programas de planicaci?n y las publicaciones. Cuando se empieza a tener reuniones informativas temprano en el proceso de la planicaci?n y se repiten a lo largo de la vida del proyecto, los posibles impactos a las poblaciones desfavorecidas, el medio ambiente y otros grupos denidos se identican y las medidas atenuantes se incorporan al plan con m?s facilidad. El formato de las sesiones informativas es m?s exible, y queda a la discreci?n del personal del NVCOG pertinente. Un formato popular es de ir directamente a reuniones ordinarias o reuniones especiales de organizaciones socias, en vez de convocar reuniones informativas publicas adicionales. Las reuniones informativas p?blicas se realizar?n en salas de reuniones accesibles, y a petici?n, habr? disponible los servicios de interpretaci?n/ traducci?n y por se?as. La noticaci?n se debe hacer con una semana de antelaci?n. En lo que las sesiones informativas son m?s informales que las sesiones p?blicas, los comentarios o quejas del p?blico se deben documentar, guardar y considerar para su inclusi?n en el documento, la pol?tica o producto nal. Los participantes y el p?blico pueden tambi?n dejar sus comentarios antes o despu?s de la reuni?n informativa. 13 Publicando los planes y documentos La pol?tica de los registros p?blicos El NVCOG cumplir? con todas las ?leyes de libertad de informaci?n? federales y estatales vigentes. Copias impresas y/o electr?nicas de todos los estatutos, pol?ticas, acuerdos, minutas del orden del d?a, referidos, resoluciones, solicitudes a becas, contratos, presupuestos, informes de auditor?as y otros documentos pertinentes se pondr?n a la disposici?n del p?blico a petici?n, o est?n disponibles para revisar en las ocinas del NVCOG durante el horario laboral. Adem?s, muchos de esos documentos est?n disponibles en el sitio Web del NVCOG. El NVCOG mantiene auditor?as internas y expedientes nancieros, documentaci?n de la cual est? disponible para la Ocina de Cumplimiento de Contrato del CTDOT o cualquier otra parte interesada apropiada, a petici?n. Respaldo del RPC Cada proyecto mayor o menor ha de buscar el respaldo de la Comisi?n de Planicaci?n Regional (RPC) antes de comenzar con la fase de comentario p?blico. Los productos deben ponerse a la disposici?n del RPC una semana antes de la reuni?n ordinaria. En el momento de la reuni?n el RPC decidir? respaldar el documento o aplazar la decisi?n a la pr?xima reuni?n del RPC para hacer revisiones. Traducciones Todo futuro proyecto ha de ser traducido al espa?ol antes de divulgarlo durante el periodo de comentario p?bico. El plan del programa t?tulo VI del NVCOG y la pol?tica de justicia ambiental del NVCOG han determinado que una gran parte de la poblaci?n de la regi?n del NVCOG es hispanoparlante, con la mayor?a de los hispanoparlantes de descendencia puertorrique?a. Todo proyecto mayor o menor ha de incluir un descargo de responsabilidad de traducci?n en ingl?s, espa?ol, portugu?s, alban?s, polaco, italiano y mandarino (simplicado). El periodo de comentario p?blico Antes de la publicaci?n nal de un programa o plan, es necesario proporcionarle al p?blico con un periodo de comentario p?bico, durante el cual las parte interesadas pueden comentar o hacer recomendaciones sobre el programa o plan como mejor les convenga. El NVCOG reconoce que independiente de la programaci?n de cualesquiera sesiones p?blicas o reuniones p?blicas, seguro habr? individuos afectados que no podr?n asistir. Los periodos de comentario publico permiten que todas las partes interesadas puedan aportar sus opiniones referentes al desarrollo de los programas o planes antes de la publicaci?n nal. Los periodos de comentario p?blico para los documentos publicados por el NVCOG durar?n el t?rmino apropiado enumerado en la tabla de la p?gina 9. El p?blico ser? informado de los periodos de comentario p?blico mediante una noticaci?n legal en los peri?dicos pertinentes, un anuncio en el sitio Web del NVCOG en forma de noticia, y una publicaci?n en la p?gina Facebook del NVCOG. De haber un sub-grupo pertinente de la lista de correos de NVCOG (por ejemplo, un sub-grupo espec?co al proyecto o al tema) el periodo de comentario se anunciar? mediante la distribuci?n a la lista de correos. Los proyectos importantes han de estar disponibles en las alcald?as de las municipalidades miembros. Aprobaci?n por la junta directiva del NVCOG El paso nal en la publicaci?n de cualquier programa o plan es la aprobaci?n de la junta directiva del NVCOG. El personal consultar? la secretaria del NVCOG para acordar una hora en la que se puede presentar el plan o el programa ante la junta directiva. 14 Procedimiento est?ndar de publicaci?n El siguiente diagrama de ujo demuestra los pasos adecuados para la publicaci?n nal de documentos para todos los documentos del NVCOG. Revisi?n del personal Revisi?n del RPC Respaldo del RPC Comentario p?blico Sesiones p?blicas Hacer cambios El Consejo *si necesario Sesiones informativas Proyectos mayores Proyectos menores Asuntos ordinarios Tarea Leyenda *paso opcional 15 Acciones de la junta directiva del NVCOG Hay dos acciones que la junta del NVCOG puede tomar referente a los programas o las pol?ticas de NVCOG: aprobar o respaldar 1. Una aprobaci?n: La junta directiva del NVCOG acepta la posici?n y las metas del documento o pol?tica. 2. Un respaldo: La junta directiva del NVCOG respalda los hechos y an?lisis subsiguiente proporcionada por el personal del NVCOG. Un respaldo indica una aceptaci?n del an?lisis objetivo, pero no indica necesariamente que lo aprueba o desaprueba. Revisiones a la pol?tica Las revisiones a esta pol?tica han de seguir el procedimiento de los proyectos menores, excepto que el periodo de comentario p?blico ser? de cuarenta y cinco (45) d?as. Dado que este documento gobierna todos los dem?s requisitos de participaci?n, es benecioso dar tiempo adicional al p?blico y al personal para proporcionar e incorporar los comentarios signicativos. Los cambios menores t?cnicos a esta pol?tica (por ejemplo, cambios en el software) no requieren un proceso de integraci?n p?blica.

Public Outreach Policy

Public Outreach Policy Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments Executive Committee  Neil O’Leary, Mayor, Waterbury ? Chairman  Mark Lauretti, Mayor, Shelton ? Vice Chairman  Ken Cockayne, Mayor, Bristol ? Secretary  Tom Dunn, Mayor, Wolcott ? Treasurer  Leonard Assard, First Selectman, Bethlehem  Chris Bielik, First Selectman, Beacon Falls  N. Warren “Pete” Hess, Mayor, Naugatuck  Kurt Miller, First Selectman, Seymour  Ed Mone, First Selectman, Thomaston Sta  Rick Dunne, Executive Director  Mark C. Nielsen, Director of Planning  William Leverence, Finance Director  Trish Bauer, Oce & Financial Manager  Arthur Bogen, Brownelds Consultant  Aaron Budris, Senior Regional Planner  Max Tanguay-Colucci, Regional Planner  John DiCarlo, Municipal Shared Services Coordinator  Christian Meyer, Supervising Transportation Planner  Benjamin Muller, Transportation Planner*  Mark Pandol, Transit Capital Administrator  Glenda Prentiss, GIS Program Coordinator  Lauren Rizzo, Administrative Services Coordinator  Joanna Rogalski, Regional Planner / Emergency Management*  Karen Svetz, P.E., Regional Transportation Engineer * indicates principal authors Sources of Copies  Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments 49 Leavenworth Street, 3rd Floor Waterbury, CT 06702  Phone: (203) 757-0535  Email: nvcog@nvcogct.org  Website: www.nvcogct.org Acknowledgments  All Maps & Photos by NVCOG Sta  Icons by Icon Fair via The Noun Project EN Translations available by request. ES Traducciones disponibles bajo petici?n. IT Traduzioni disponibili su richiesta. PL Tumaczenia dostpne na zam?wienie. PT Tradu??es dispon?veis mediante solicita – ??o. SQ P?rkthime n? dispozicion me k?rkes?. ZH |?}F?~???~ ??  1 Mission Statement It is the goal of the NVCOG to fully engage residents and stakeholders in identifying planning priorities, developing programs and projects, and publishing nal products. In particular, it is the NVCOG’s goal to ensure meaningful access to participation in planning and policy decision-making processes for disadvantaged populations in our planning region. About Us The Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments (NVCOG) is a regional Council of Governments (COG) comprising nineteen (19) cities and towns in west-central Connecticut. The NVCOG is also a host agency for the Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) for the Greater Waterbury Urbanized Area (UZA), and is a partner in the Greater Bridgeport and Valley MPO. The NVCOG works closely with other federal, state, and local agencies to facilitate cooperation among its nineteen member municipalities regarding transportation, environmental, economic, and development policies and issues. The NVCOG?s roles as a COG and MPO host agency come with the responsibility to ensure the public has meaningful opportunities to participate at various stages in the planning and policy decision-making process. Meaningful public input helps ensure that projects and funds are equitably allocated. The NVCOG is fully committed to engaging residents and stakeholders in all stages of the planning process to learn the publics? transportation and development wants and needs. This document will outline the process for public participation and involvement, providing public outreach guidance and standards for NVCOG sta and engaged citizens. Public outreach is modeled as a continuous feedback loop, wherein the public is engaged at each step of planning and each public engagement opportunity informs the next step of decision-making. Through this feedback loop, the NVCOG hopes to foster a collaborative planning relationship with residents and workers in the NVCOG region. Introduction 2 Council of Governments (COG) The NVCOG?s role as a Council of Governments (or Council) is dened in Connecticut General Statutes Chapter 50 ? 4-124i through ? 4-124u. The NVCOG?s decision-making body is its Council of the Chief Elected Ocials (CEOs) of each municipality, or member, in the planning region. Decision-making structures for the Council are dened in the organization bylaws. The Council oversees matters of regional planning and municipal services cooperation, including transportation priorities of neighboring MPO regions (see next section). As a Council of Governments, the NVCOG?s primary planning responsibility is the drafting of a regional planning document known as the Regional Plan of Conservation and Development (POCD). The Regional POCD makes recommendations for “land use, housing, principal highways and freeways, bridges, airports, parks, playgrounds, recreational areas, schools, public institutions, public utilities, agriculture and such other matters as will be benecial to the area.” (Connecticut General Statutes Chapter 127 ? 8-35a.) and informs the State POCD. Public outreach requirements during the drafting of the POCD are also outlined in this statute. METROPOLITAN SOUTH CENTRAL NORTHEASTERN SOUTHEASTERN CAPITOL REGION New London Windsor Locks Ansonia Beacon Falls Derby West Haven Wethers- field Thomaston Plainville East Haven New Britain Old Saybrook Middle- field Newing- ton Deep River Cromwell Rocky Hill East Granby North Canaan East Hartford Bridge- water West- brook Naugatuck Sprague Bridge- port Prospect Wood- bridge Seymour New Haven West Hartford Middle- bury North Haven New Canaan Essex Darien Andover Bethlehem North Branford Marl- borough Ne w Fairfield South Windsor Brookfield East Windsor Scot- land Strat- ford Hartford Bolton Westport Clinton Columbia Plymouth Lisbon Franklin Chaplin Bloomfield Sherman Old Lyme Weston Trumbull East Hampton Norwalk Hampton Watertown Southington Killing- worth Milford East Lyme Eastford Willington Sterling Cheshire Middletown Voluntown Hamden Stamford Madison Chester Orange Vernon Manchester Bethel Branford Bethany Putnam Farmington Wolcott Bozrah Morri s Waterbury Meriden Durham Portland Windham New Hartford Barkhamsted Burlington Winchester Roxbury Harwinton Colebrook Brooklyn Canton Washington Monroe North Stonington Ridgefield Norwich Waterford Somers Warren Woodbury Simsbury Wallingford Canterbury Windsor Fairfield Stonington Redding Easton Southbury Ellington Torrington Hartland Preston Bristol Shelton Canaan Wilton Avon Griswold Coventry East Haddam Berlin Salem Glastonbury Groton Greenwi ch Thompson Colchester Plainfield Oxford Union Mansfield Enfield Ledyard Hebron Montville Ashford Pomfret Danbury Cornwall Tolland Haddam Granby New Milford Suffield Goshen Woodstock Lyme Guilford Lebanon Norfolk Newtown Killingly Litchfield Salisbury Stafford Sharon Kent NAUGATUCK VALLEY WESTERN NORTHWEST HILLS LOWER CONNECTICUT RIVER VALLEY I 010205 Miles Source: OPM, State of Connecticut, U.S. Census Bureau 2010 Map 1: Councils of Government in Connecticut NVCOG Members  Ansonia  Beacon Falls  Bethlehem  Bristol  Cheshire  Derby  Middlebury  Naugatuck  Oxford  Plymouth  Prospect  Seymour  Shelton  Southbury  Thomaston  Waterbury  Watertown  Wolcott  Woodbury 3 3 Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs) As a Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) host agency, the NVCOG functions as the Central Naugatuck Valley MPO and cooperates with the Greater Bridgeport and Valley MPO on regional transportation planning processes and capital improvement programs for the two aforementioned MPO regions. MPOs are authorized by federal regulations, organized by municipalities as regions and designated by the Governor. MPOs conduct transportation planning and endorse the transportation improvement program for its constituent communities. The NVCOG solely hosts the Central Naugatuck Valley MPO (CNVMPO), and as such all CNVMPO activities must conform to this public participation policy. The NVCOG shares hosting responsibility with MetroCOG, the RPO for Greater Bridgeport, for four NVCOG member municipalities in the Greater Bridgeport and Valley MPO (GBVMPO): Ansonia, Derby, Seymour, and Shelton. NVCOG activities that incorporate these four municipalities must still conform to this public participation policy, but MPO-related activities in these four municipalities must conform to both the GBVMPO Public Participation Plan and this policy, using the more stringent requirement in the case of conicts. METROPOLITAN SOUTH CENTRAL NORTHEASTERN SOUTHEASTERN CAPITOL REGION New London Windsor Locks Ansonia Beacon Falls Derby West Haven Wethers- field Thomaston Plainville East Haven New Britain Old Saybrook Middle- field Newing- ton Deep River Cromwell Rocky Hill East Granby North Canaan East Hartford Bridge- water West- brook Naugatuck Sprague Bridge- port Prospect Wood- bridge Seymour New Haven West Hartford Middle- bury North Haven New Canaan Essex Darien Andover Bethlehem North Branford Marl- borough Ne w Fairfield South Windsor Brookfield East Windsor Scot- land Strat- ford Hartford Bolton Westport Clinton Columbia Plymouth Lisbon Franklin Chaplin Bloomfield Sherman Old Lyme Weston Trumbull East Hampton Norwalk Hampton Watertown Southington Killing- worth Milford East Lyme Eastford Willington Sterling Cheshire Middletown Voluntown Hamden Stamford Madison Chester Orange Vernon Manchester Bethel Branford Bethany Putnam Farmington Wolcott Bozrah Morri s Waterbury Meriden Durham Portland Windham New Hartford Barkhamsted Burlington Winchester Roxbury Harwinton Colebrook Brooklyn Canton Washington Monroe North Stonington Ridgefield Norwich Waterford Somers Warren Woodbury Simsbury Wallingford Canterbury Windsor Fairfield Stonington Redding Easton Southbury Ellington Torrington Hartland Preston Bristol Shelton Canaan Wilton Avon Griswold Coventry East Haddam Berlin Salem Glastonbury Groton Greenwi ch Thompson Colchester Plainfield Oxford Union Mansfield Enfield Ledyard Hebron Montville Ashford Pomfret Danbury Cornwall Tolland Haddam Granby New Milford Suffield Goshen Woodstock Lyme Guilford Lebanon Norfolk Newtown Killingly Litchfield Salisbury Stafford Sharon Kent NAUGATUCK VALLEY WESTERN NORTHWEST HILLS LOWER CONNECTICUT RIVER VALLEY I 010205 Miles Source: OPM, State of Connecticut, U.S. Census Bureau 2010 COG Boundaries MPO Boundaries Municipalities URBANIZED AREAS (CENSUS 2010) Bridgeport-Stamford, CT/NY Danbury, CT/NY Hartford, CT New Haven, CT Norwich-New London, CT/RI Springfield, MA/CT Waterbury, CT Worcester, MA/CT Urban Clusters Map 2: MPOs and Urbanized Areas in Connecticut CNVMPO Members  Beacon Falls  Bethlehem  Bristol  Cheshire  Middlebury  Naugatuck  Oxford  Plymouth  Prospect  Southbury  Thomaston  Waterbury  Watertown  Wolcott  Woodbury GBVMPO Members  Ansonia  Derby  Seymour  Shelton 4 Air Quality Non-Attainment Area As both MPOs lie in an air quality non-attainment area for both Particulate Matter 2.5 (2006) and for Ozone (2008), NVCOG must also include public outreach on designation of air-quality conformity for transportation plans and TIPs. Civil Rights The NVCOG is dedicated to seeking out and considering the needs of disadvantaged populations. Our agency has worked to identify geographic areas with EJ communities under Title VI, Environmental Justice, and ADA regulations. Title VI, Language Access, & Environmental Justice Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits exclusion from participation in, denial of the benets of, and discrimination under federally- assisted programs on the grounds of race, color, or national origin. The NVCOG works to ensure all programs and projects are consistent with the letter and the spirit of Title VI, regardless of assistance from federal or state programs. The NVCOG also works to provide Limited English Prociency (LEP) populations in our planning region with meaningful access to planning activities. Specically, there are populations of Spanish- and Polish-speaking LEPs across the region. The Spanish-speaking LEPs in the region largely identify as Puerto Rican. Because the NVCOG also operates the capital budget for the Valley Transit District, the agency has additional responsibilities under the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) to provide language access (Ex. Order #13166). For details on the agency’s Title VI process, and for related language access information, see the Title VI Program Plan. In addition to Title VI responsibilities, the NVCOG is committed to supporting environmental justice in its planning activities, as outlined in Executive Order 12898. To this end, the NVCOG has identied locations within the planning region where target populations live, and regularly investigates the impacts of the NVCOG?s planning activities on these populations. For more details on the NVCOG?s Environmental Justice program, see the Environmental Justice Plan & Analysis. Age & Disability The NVCOG is committed to ensuring residents of all ages and ability levels have access to our public outreach. To this end, the NVCOG has identied the locations of populations of senior residents (65+) in the region, and works to ensure that all public hearings and documents are available in accessible locations and formats. Complaints Procedures When the NVCOG receives complaints from the public about municipal or regional policies, planning decisions, ongoing projects, or the like, tracking and response is essential. Some topics, such as ADA accommodations and potential discrimination complaints, are required by statute to be tracked and addressed in a particular manner. Maintaining a process to track and address complaints will ensure that these legal requirements are met and that the NVCOG is doing its best to serve the public. All complaints received by NVCOG sta should be recorded, along with the date and time of the complaint, in a spreadsheet on our internal servers. Complaints should then be immediately forwarded to the appropriate sta member within the NVCOG, including the designated Civil Rights Ocer. All complaints received by the NVCOG shall be responded to within ten (10) business days by the appropriate sta member. If a complaint concerns planning activities outside the NVCOG jurisdiction, the complainant should be informed of a more applicable outlet for the complaint. When appropriate, NVCOG sta should also forward complaints to other regional and local agencies. For specic processes related to ADA or Title VI complaints, please see the relevant program policies on the NVCOG website ( www.nvcogct.org ). 5 NVCOG believes that the public should be frequently and meaningfully engaged in regional planning and project development processes. The following public outreach guidelines are modeled on a continuous feedback ?loop? format where NVCOG requests input from the public, incorporates that feedback into the plan, and requests further input. Likewise, the public may request information from NVCOG and give feedback relevant to its planning projects. Caveats If federal, state, or other regulations prescribe public participation requirements which are more specic or more comprehensive than NVCOG?s policies, these requirements shall supersede the public participation policies outlined below. Additionally, should public participation requirements change to become more specic or comprehensive, they shall override the NVCOG?s policies. When such incongruences come to light, it is the responsibility of NVCOG sta to consider whether an update to this document is necessary to better serve the population of the region. Identifying Priorities & Plan Development Gathering Public Opinion Publishing Plans & Documents Participation Loop 6 Identifying Priorities & Plan Development Maintaining continual and meaningful public outreach may encourage participation in long-term planning processes, and is essential to ensuring that the NVCOG’s work fully considers residents? and stakeholders? needs and wants as it develops and prioritizes planning projects. To facilitate these interactions, the following policies are outlined governing day-to-day and other public communications. Sta Availability NVCOG sta are available to the public during regular work hours, 8:30am-4:30pm, at the NVCOG oce in downtown Waterbury. Sta may also be reached by phone or email during these hours. Any immediate comments or complaints can always be submitted directly to NVCOG sta, assuming relevant sta are working, on-site, and available. When possible, scheduling a meeting will ensure that sta members are available to listen to, learn from and respond to the public. NVCOG Board The NVCOG Board directs NVCOG programs and policies, and as such has special requirements for public notice and access. These requirements may be found in their bylaws, available through the NVCOG website ( www.nvcogct.org ). Copies are also available via mail by sending a written request to: 49 Leavenworth Street, 3rd Floor Waterbury, CT 06702 (203) 757-0535, nvcogct@nvcogct.org Email Lists & Maintenance The NVCOG has set up a general public outreach email list through MailChimp, an internet based emailing service. This email list shall be available for the public to sign up for regular email updates about agency activities and events. Email list users are also welcome to unsubscribe from NVCOG emails at will. NVCOG sta shall monitor participation in the existing email list and create topic-specic lists for more targeted mailings as needed. The general email list may be used to distribute a regular newsletter outlining upcoming public meetings, important meeting and event dates, or recently-published plan documents. The newsletter?s distribution frequency and contents are at the discretion of NVCOG sta. Additionally, individual projects may develop their own email lists. When feasible, these project-specic lists should be compiled with the same online email service as more general outreach lists to more easily merge the project list into the general list upon project completion. The footer area of project-specic public emails should include a link to subscribe or unsubscribe to the general public outreach list. Social Media The NVCOG maintains a presence on social media through Facebook. The primary purpose of the NVCOG Facebook page is to maintain a relationship with the public. All full-time sta have Facebook posting privileges and are invited to post informative content about agency activities and broader planning trends. Posts need not be directly related to NVCOG planning activities and projects. The NVCOG reserves the right to delete comments which threaten the safety of individuals or groups, are personal attacks, disclose personal information, or are otherwise inappropriate. Complaints and public comments submitted through social media should be logged, tracked and addressed using the complaint procedure outlined on page 4. 7 Website Calendar & News Policies The NVCOG website is an additional channel of communication between the NVCOG and the public. The site serves as a repository for all policy and planning documents created by and for the NVCOG, and displays an organizational calendar of events and a news feed, both of which are displayed on the main homepage. The organizational calendar shall be updated with all publicly-accessible meetings, including meetings of the NVCOG Board, Regional Planning Commission (RPC), MPOs, and any Citizen Advisory Committees. The organizational calendar has been incorporated into the public notication guidelines for all public meetings. The website?s newsfeed should be updated regularly with all draft and nal publications, as well as any special events or accolades such as a grant award. Citizen Advisory Committees Citizen Advisory Committees are standing committees of citizen representatives formed to consider a particular topic, project or plan of regional interest. Their function and membership depends on the needs of the Board, public input and planning project timelines. Advisory committees are useful for developing a long-term, coordinated organizational perspective on particular issues, and to obtain the input of relevant experts and advocates on planning activities. Convening citizen advisory committees may aid in identifying new priorities or regional needs. While these committees are very eective at identifying priorities and gaining citizen and expert input from the community, their facilitation may require signicant NVCOG sta time. The cost of maintaining these committees should be balanced with their relevance. Citizen Advisory Committees may be disbanded and reconvened as needed, or may be formed with the understanding that they will disband once a planning project or plan has been fully realized. NVCOG has developed the following policies regulating the public nature of Citizen Advisory Committees (CAC): 1. No CACs have decision-making powers unless specically delegated by the NVCOG Board. 2. All meetings of CACs are open to the public, and shall be planned, located, and advertised consistent with the following policies: a. Public notice of meetings shall be made seven (7) days before the meeting date. Notices shall include the location, time, and a proposed agenda. b. When reasonable, a regular meeting schedule shall be adopted and meeting dates for a year shall be listed publicly on the committee?s webpage. c. Meeting minutes or summaries shall be published within seventy-two (72) hours on the website. d. Meetings shall be held in a location that is accessible via transit and complies with ADA standards. Interpretive services shall be oered with three (3) days? notice. i. Note of this accessibility shall be made in public notice of the meeting. 3. Committees may be formed and disbanded at the judgment of the Executive Director unless otherwise stated. Regional Planning Commission (RPC) The RPC is a citizen advisory committee whose membership and duties are outlined in the NVCOG Bylaws. The RPC can only be disbanded through a vote of the NVCOG Board. 8 Gathering Public Opinion on Specic Projects Meaningful public engagement helps NVCOG sta gather public opinion on draft and nal editions of planning and policy documents. Planning and policy documents published by the NVCOG range in scope, from minor revisions of policy to sweeping master plans that will guide investment and policy for years to come. The NVCOG has developed a tiered process for public engagement to address this range. The following tiers are to be used when designing public engagement processes: Major Projects This tier is made up of broad, far-reaching documents with major impacts on policy and programming over several years. Many of these documents have specic public participation requirements. Because of the importance of this tier, several required products are called out specically (see page 9). This tier also includes large highway and transit projects under design or construction overseen by the agency. Minor Projects This tier is made up of minor publications or studies not required by statute under Tasks 2 & 3 of the Unied Planning Work Program (UPWP, the program of all MPO activities to be performed by NVCOG sta during the Program’s term), and interval updates to broad policy documents that do not substantially change the policy therein. Regular Business This tier is for regular meetings and announcements and minor plan or policy updates. This tier may also be an avenue for communicating pertinent local, regional, or national news of awards or grant opportunities. 9 NVCOG Documents and Projects Long Range Transportation Plan (LRTP) Public Hearings Informational Meetings Public Notice Comment Period 2 As Needed Advertisement, Calendar, Mailing List, Copies to Municipalities, Press Release, Social Media, Web Page 45 days Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) Public Hearings Informational Meetings Public Notice Comment Period 1 As Needed Advertisement, Calendar, Mailing List, Press Release, Social Media, Web Page 45 days Unied Planning Work Program (UPWP) Public Hearings Informational Meetings Public Notice Comment Period 1 As Needed Calendar, Mailing List, Press Release, Social Media 30 days Regional Plan Of Conservation & Development (POCD) Public Hearings Informational Meetings Public Notice Comment Period 2 As Needed Advertisement, Calendar, Mailing List, Copies to Municipalities, Press Release, Social Media, Web Page 65 days Other Major Projects Public Hearings Informational Meetings Public Notice Comment Period 1 As Needed Advertisement, Calendar, Mailing List, Press Release, Social Media, Web Page 45 days Minor Projects Public Hearings Informational Meetings Public Notice Comment Period 0 1+ Legal Notice, Newsletter Item, Social Media 30 days Regular Business Public Hearings Informational Meetings Public Notice Comment Period 0 0+ Calendar, Newsletter Item, Social Media 30 days if applicable 10 Public Hearings For certain projects, there is a statutory requirement to convene public hearings where presentations may be made and public comment may be formally registered. The NVCOG requires public hearings for all major projects. Public hearings must conform to the following standards:  Held at convenient and accessible locations and times  Public notice of meetings, at least one week in advance: o In a newspaper of large circulation in the aected area, preferably via an advertisement o through the mailing list or to a targeted mailing list, as appropriate  Include contact person and phone number and email  In an accessible location  Interpretation/Translation and Signing available by request or by default  Recorded and minutes transcribed  Comments recorded by commenter name and agency if relevant Public hearings must explain the following information at a minimum:  The project?s purpose, need, and consistency with the goals and objectives of any local urban planning;  The project?s alternatives, and major design features;  The social, economic, environmental, and other impacts of the project; and  The relocation assistance program and the right-of-way acquisition process.  The agency?s procedures for receiving both oral and written statements from the public. In addition to the above requirements, major projects must be consistent with the public hearing regulations from the relevant funding authority (FHWA, FTA, etc.). Public Informational Meetings Public informational meetings are less formal public outreach events designed to inform the community and relevant stakeholders and to request input on planning programs and publications. When informational meetings are started early in the planning process and recur throughout the life of the project, potential impacts on disadvantaged populations, the environment, and other groups are identied and mitigation measures more easily incorporated into the plan. The format of public informational meetings is more exible, and is at the discretion of relevant NVCOG sta. A popular format is to go directly to regularly-scheduled or special meetings of partner organizations, rather than scheduling additional public informational meetings. Informational meetings shall be located in accessible meeting rooms, and interpretation/translation and signing shall be available by request. Public notice should be made at least one week in advance. While informational meetings may be more informal than public hearings, complaints or comments from the public should be documented and saved and considered for inclusion in the nal document, policy, or product. Participants and the public may also leave comment before or after an informational meeting. 11 Publishing Plans & Documents Public Records Policy The NVCOG shall comply with all applicable federal and state ?Freedom of Information Laws.? Physical and/or electronic copies of all governing bylaws, policies, agreements, agendas minutes, referrals, resolutions, grant applications, contracts, budgets, audit reports, and other relevant documents shall be made available to the public by request, or are available for review at the NVCOG oce during working hours. Additionally, many of these documents are freely available via the NVCOG website. The NVCOG maintains internal audits and nancial records, documentation of which is available to the CTDOT Oce of Contract Compliance or any other appropriate party by request. RPC Endorsement All minor and major projects should seek endorsement from the Regional Planning Commission (RPC) be – fore entering a public comment period. Products should be made available to the RPC one week before a regular meeting. At the time of the meeting, the RPC shall decide whether to endorse the document or to provide until the next RPC meeting for revisions. Translations All future major projects should be translated into Spanish before being released to a public comment period. The NVCOG Title VI Program Plan and the NVCOG Environmental Justice Policy both nd that signicant portions of the NVCOG region speak Spanish as a primary language, with a majority of Spanish-speakers being of Puerto Rican descent. All major and minor projects should include a translation disclaimer in English, Spanish, Portuguese, Albanian, Polish, Italian, and Mandarin (Simplied). Public Comment Period Before the nal publication of a program or plan, it is necessary to provide the public a period of public comment during which interested parties and stakeholders may make comments or recommendations on the program or plan at their leisure. The NVCOG recognizes that regardless of the scheduling of any public hearings or informational meetings, there are likely to be aected individuals who cannot attend. Public comment periods allow all interested parties input towards the development of programs and plans before nal publication. Public comment periods for documents published by the NVCOG shall last for the appropriate term as listed in the table on page 9. The public shall be made aware of public comment periods through a legal notice in relevant newspapers, an announcement on the NVCOG website as a news item, and a post on the NVCOG Facebook page. Should there be a relevant sub-group of the NVCOG mailing list (e.g., a project-specic or topic-specic sub-group), the public comment period shall be advertised via the mailing list. Comment periods for major projects should always be advertised to the full mailing list. Included in the public comment notice should be reference to any scheduled public hearings or informational meetings, as well as contact information for relevant sta members. During the public comment period, copies of the draft document(s) must be made available by request via the website, mail, and in person at the NVCOG oce. Major projects should be made available at the city and town halls of member municipalities. NVCOG Board Approval The nal step in the publication of any program or plan is approval by the NVCOG Board. Sta will consult the NVCOG Administrative Assistant to arrange a time the program or plan may be brought before the Board. 12 Standard Publication Procedure The following owchart shows the proper ow of nal document publication for all NVCOG documents. Sta Review RPC Review RPC Endorse Public Comment Public Hearing Make Changes NVCOG Board *if necessary Informational Meeting Major Project Minor Project Regular Business Task Legend *optional step 13 NVCOG Board Actions There are two actions the NVCOG Board may take regarding NCVOG programs and policies: Approve or Endorse. 1. Approve : The NVCOG Board accepts the stance and the goals of the document or policy. 2. Endorse: The NVCOG Board endorses the facts and subsequent analysis provided by NVCOG sta. Endorsement indicates an acceptance of factual analysis, and does not necessarily indicate approval or disapproval. Policy Revisions Revisions to this policy should follow the procedure for minor projects, excepting that the public comment period shall be forty-ve (45) days. Because this document governs all other public participation requirements it is helpful to give additional time to the public and to sta to provide and incorporate meaningful comments. Minor technical edits to this policy (e.g., changes in software) do not require a public engagement process.

Environmental Justice Policy

Environmental Justice Policy Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments Executive Committee  Neil O’Leary, Mayor, Waterbury  Mark Lauretti, Mayor, Shelton  Ken Cockayne, Mayor, Bristol  Tom Dunn, Mayor, Wolcott  Leonard Assard, First Selectman, Bethlehem  Chris Bielik, First Selectman, Beacon Falls  N. Warren “Pete” Hess, Mayor, Naugatuck  Kurt Miller, First Selectman, Seymour  Ed Mone, First Selectman, Thomaston Sta  Rick Dunne, Executive Director  Mark C. Nielsen, Director of Planning  William Leverence, Finance Director  Trish Bauer, Oce & Financial Manager  Arthur Bogen, Brownelds Consultant  Aaron Budris, Senior Regional Planner  Max Tanguay-Colucci, Regional Planner  John DiCarlo, Municipal Shared Services Coordinator  Christian Meyer, Supervising Transportation Planner  Benjamin Muller, Transportation Planner*  Mark Pandol, Transit Capital Administrator  Glenda Prentiss, GIS Program Coordinator  Lauren Rizzo, Administrative Services Coordinator  Joanna Rogalski, Regional Planner / Emergency Management*  Karen Svetz, P.E., Regional Transportation Engineer * indicates principal authors Sources of Copies  Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments  Leavenworth Street, rd Floor Waterbury, CT   Phone: () -  Email: nvcog@nvcogct.org  Website: www.nvcogct.org Acknowledgments  All Photos by NVCOG Sta EN Translations available by request. ES Traducciones disponibles bajo petici?n. IT Traduzioni disponibili su richiesta. PL Tumaczenia dostpne na zam?wienie. PT Tradu??es dispon?veis mediante solicita – ??o. SQ P?rkthime n? dispozicion me k?rkes?. ZH |?}F?~???~ ??   Mission Statement The Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments (NVCOG), a nineteen () municipality region in central- western Connecticut, is committed to achieving the full, fair, and meaningful participation of minority and low-income populations in its transportation, land use, economic development, and environmental planning processes. To fulll this commitment, the NVCOG has incorporated environmental justice principles into its planning, programming, and decision-making processes. What is Environmental Justice? Environmental justice is the policy and practice which calls for an agency to identify and address disproportionately high and adverse human health or environmental eects of its programs, policies, and activities on minority populations and low-income populations. It also calls for identifying strategies and techniques for meaningful engagement of populations meeting the needs for environmental justice. To further the NVCOG’s commitment to environmental justice practice, the subsequent guiding principles will be followed:  to avoid, minimize, or mitigate disproportionately high and adverse human health and environmental eects, including social and economic eects, on minority populations and low- income populations;  to ensure the full and fair participation by all potentially aected communities in the planning decision-making process; and  to prevent the denial of, reduction in, or signicant delay in the receipt of benets by minority and low-income populations.  Applicability of this Policy The environmental justice provisions described in this policy apply to every phase of NVCOG planning decision-making processes, regardless of funding source. This policy also applies to activities of entities using NVCOG funds or facilities. Additionally, this policy applies to all actions of the Central Naugatuck Valley MPO and NVCOG activities on behalf of the Greater Bridgeport?Valley MPO. When requirements from funding sources or partners dier from those in this policy, the NVCOG shall use the more stringent requirement. Implementation of this Policy Environmental justice analyses at the project and program levels are the primary means by which NVCOG implements this EJ policy. Standards and steps to guide EJ analysis are found on page  of this policy statement. 1 FHWA Environmental Justice FAQ ( http://www.fhwa.dot/gov/environmental/environmental_justice_faq/index.cfm ) Introduction  Council of Governments (COG) The NVCOG?s role as a Council of Governments (or Council) is dened in Connecticut General Statutes Chapter  ? -i through ? -u. The NVCOG?s decision-making body is its Council of the Chief Elected Ocials (CEOs) of each municipality, or member, in the planning region. Decision-making structures for the Council are dened in the organization bylaws. The Council oversees matters of regional planning and municipal services cooperation, including transportation priorities of neighboring MPO regions (see next section). As a Council of Governments, the NVCOG?s primary planning responsibility is the drafting of a regional planning document known as the Regional Plan of Conservation and Development (POCD). The Regional POCD makes recommendations for “land use, housing, principal highways and freeways, bridges, airports, parks, playgrounds, recreational areas, schools, public institutions, public utilities, agriculture and such other matters as will be benecial to the area.” (Connecticut General Statutes Chapter  ? -a.) and informs the State POCD. METROPOLITAN SOUTH CENTRAL NORTHEASTERN SOUTHEASTERN CAPITOL REGION New London Windsor Locks Ansonia Beacon Falls Derby West Haven Wethers- field Thomaston Plainville East Haven New Britain Old Saybrook Middle- field Newing- ton Deep River Cromwell Rocky Hill East Granby North Canaan East Hartford Bridge- water West- brook Naugatuck Sprague Bridge- port Prospect Wood- bridge Seymour New Haven West Hartford Middle- bury North Haven New Canaan Essex Darien Andover Bethlehem North Branford Marl- borough Ne w Fairfield South Windsor Brookfield East Windsor Scot- land Strat- ford Hartford Bolton Westport Clinton Columbia Plymouth Lisbon Franklin Chaplin Bloomfield Sherman Old Lyme Weston Trumbull East Hampton Norwalk Hampton Watertown Southington Killing- worth Milford East Lyme Eastford Willington Sterling Cheshire Middletown Voluntown Hamden Stamford Madison Chester Orange Vernon Manchester Bethel Branford Bethany Putnam Farmington Wolcott Bozrah Morri s Waterbury Meriden Durham Portland Windham New Hartford Barkhamsted Burlington Winchester Roxbury Harwinton Colebrook Brooklyn Canton Washington Monroe North Stonington Ridgefield Norwich Waterford Somers Warren Woodbury Simsbury Wallingford Canterbury Windsor Fairfield Stonington Redding Easton Southbury Ellington Torrington Hartland Preston Bristol Shelton Canaan Wilton Avon Griswold Coventry East Haddam Berlin Salem Glastonbury Groton Greenwi ch Thompson Colchester Plainfield Oxford Union Mansfield Enfield Ledyard Hebron Montville Ashford Pomfret Danbury Cornwall Tolland Haddam Granby New Milford Suffield Goshen Woodstock Lyme Guilford Lebanon Norfolk Newtown Killingly Litchfield Salisbury Stafford Sharon Kent NAUGATUCK VALLEY WESTERN NORTHWEST HILLS LOWER CONNECTICUT RIVER VALLEY I 010205 Miles Source: OPM, State of Connecticut, U.S. Census Bureau 2010 Map : Councils of Government in Connecticut NVCOG Members  Ansonia  Beacon Falls  Bethlehem  Bristol  Cheshire  Derby  Middlebury  Naugatuck  Oxford  Plymouth  Prospect  Seymour  Shelton  Southbury  Thomaston  Waterbury  Watertown  Wolcott  Woodbury  Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs) As a Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) host agency, the NVCOG functions as the Central Naugatuck Valley MPO and cooperates with the Greater Bridgeport and Valley MPO on regional transportation planning processes and capital improvement programs for the two aforementioned MPO regions. MPOs are authorized by federal regulations, organized by municipalities as regions and designated by the Governor. MPOs conduct transportation planning and endorse the transportation improvement program for its constituent communities. The NVCOG solely hosts the Central Naugatuck Valley MPO (CNVMPO), and as such all CNVMPO activities must conform to this environmental justice policy. The NVCOG shares hosting responsibility with MetroCOG, the RPO for Greater Bridgeport, for four NVCOG member municipalities in the Greater Bridgeport?Valley MPO (GBVMPO): Ansonia, Derby, Seymour, and Shelton. NVCOG activities that incorporate these four municipalities must still conform to this environmental justice policy, but MPO? related activities in these four municipalities must also conform to Greater Bridgeport?Valley MPO policies. METROPOLITAN SOUTH CENTRAL NORTHEASTERN SOUTHEASTERN CAPITOL REGION New London Windsor Locks Ansonia Beacon Falls Derby West Haven Wethers- field Thomaston Plainville East Haven New Britain Old Saybrook Middle- field Newing- ton Deep River Cromwell Rocky Hill East Granby North Canaan East Hartford Bridge- water West- brook Naugatuck Sprague Bridge- port Prospect Wood- bridge Seymour New Haven West Hartford Middle- bury North Haven New Canaan Essex Darien Andover Bethlehem North Branford Marl- borough Ne w Fairfield South Windsor Brookfield East Windsor Scot- land Strat- ford Hartford Bolton Westport Clinton Columbia Plymouth Lisbon Franklin Chaplin Bloomfield Sherman Old Lyme Weston Trumbull East Hampton Norwalk Hampton Watertown Southington Killing- worth Milford East Lyme Eastford Willington Sterling Cheshire Middletown Voluntown Hamden Stamford Madison Chester Orange Vernon Manchester Bethel Branford Bethany Putnam Farmington Wolcott Bozrah Morri s Waterbury Meriden Durham Portland Windham New Hartford Barkhamsted Burlington Winchester Roxbury Harwinton Colebrook Brooklyn Canton Washington Monroe North Stonington Ridgefield Norwich Waterford Somers Warren Woodbury Simsbury Wallingford Canterbury Windsor Fairfield Stonington Redding Easton Southbury Ellington Torrington Hartland Preston Bristol Shelton Canaan Wilton Avon Griswold Coventry East Haddam Berlin Salem Glastonbury Groton Greenwi ch Thompson Colchester Plainfield Oxford Union Mansfield Enfield Ledyard Hebron Montville Ashford Pomfret Danbury Cornwall Tolland Haddam Granby New Milford Suffield Goshen Woodstock Lyme Guilford Lebanon Norfolk Newtown Killingly Litchfield Salisbury Stafford Sharon Kent NAUGATUCK VALLEY WESTERN NORTHWEST HILLS LOWER CONNECTICUT RIVER VALLEY I 010205 Miles Source: OPM, State of Connecticut, U.S. Census Bureau 2010 COG Boundaries MPO Boundaries Municipalities URBANIZED AREAS (CENSUS 2010) Bridgeport-Stamford, CT/NY Danbury, CT/NY Hartford, CT New Haven, CT Norwich-New London, CT/RI Springfield, MA/CT Waterbury, CT Worcester, MA/CT Urban Clusters Map : MPOs and Urbanized Areas in Connecticut CNVMPO Members  Beacon Falls  Bethlehem  Bristol  Cheshire  Middlebury  Naugatuck  Oxford  Plymouth  Prospect  Southbury  Thomaston  Waterbury  Watertown  Wolcott  Woodbury GBVMPO Members  Ansonia  Derby  Seymour  Shelton  Bethlehem Woodbury Southbury Oxford Beacon Falls Naugatuck Prospect Cheshire Wolcott Bristol Plymouth Thomaston Watertown Middlebury Seymour Ansonia Derby Shelton Waterbury Mean: 27.4% Standard Deviation: 21.0% Universe: Individuals Red census block groups have a proportion of racial or ethnic minority populations >1 standard deviation than the mean. Minority Population 90% 69% 48% 27% 6% 0482 Miles I Source: U.S. Census Bureau ACS 2014 Table B03002 Map : Minority Population in the Naugatuck Valley COG,   Environmental justice (EJ) populations are described in Executive Order , and consist of minority populations, low-income populations, or both. To identify the location of these populations, the NVCOG uses the most recent block group level survey data collected through the American Community Survey and published by the U.S. Census Bureau. Minority The NVCOG has found concentrations of racial and ethnic minority populations in the City of Waterbury (Map ). Many census block groups region-wide have very high proportions of minority populations, with a mean proportion of .%. Well over half of the census block groups in Waterbury are minority-majority, where the population is composed of less than fty percent (%) non-Hispanic whites. (Region-wide, racial and ethnic minorities make up .% of the population.) Of the region’s population, .% (,) identify as Hispanic or Latino, while .% (,) identify as Black or African-American and .% (,) identify as Asian. White Only (Not Hispanic or Latino) Hispanic or Latino Black or African American Asian Some Other Race 14.7% 6.4% 2.5% 74.2% 2.1% Minority Population in the Naugatuck Valley COG,  Environmental Justice Populations  Bethlehem Woodbury Southbury Oxford Beacon Falls Naugatuck Prospect Cheshire Wolcott Bristol Plymouth Thomaston Watertown Middlebury Seymour Ansonia Derby Shelton Waterbury Mean: 19.4% Standard Deviation: 14.2% Universe: Individuals Red census block groups have a proportion of low-income populations >1 standard deviation from the mean. Low-Income Population 62% 48% 34% 19% 5% 0482 Miles I Source: U.S. Census Bureau ACS 2014 Table C17002 Map : Low-Income Residents in the Naugatuck Valley COG,   Low-Income The NVCOG denes “low-income” residents as members of households with a median household income less than .x the federally-dened poverty threshold, which is dependent upon the size of the household. For example, the most common household arrangement in the Naugatuck Valley COG is a married couple with a single child. The federal government denes this household as living at or below the poverty threshold if their annual earnings are equal to or less than $,. The NVCOG’s low-income threshold would multiply this federal income gure by ., resulting in a low-income threshold of $, annual household earnings. Low-income populations are concentrated in central Waterbury (Map ), however this concentration is not as pronounced as the concentration of the minority population. There are also several census block groups in Ansonia and Bristol with a majority of their residents below the NVCOG’s low-income threshold. Of , individuals in the region, , (.%) fall below the NVCOG’s low-income threshold, , (.%) fall below the federal poverty threshold, and , (.%) fall below half of the federal poverty threshold. (Under the earlier example, half of the federal poverty threshold represents individuals in a two- parent, one-child household with less than $, in annual income.) Median household income for the region is $,, while median family income is $,. .x Federal Poverty Threshold . x NVCOG Low-Income Threshold . x .x Low-Income Population in the Naugatuck Valley COG,  75.5% 1.9% 3.1% 5.5% 5.8% 3.3% 4.9%  Bethlehem Woodbury Southbury Oxford Beacon Falls Naugatuck Prospect Cheshire Wolcott Bristol Plymouth Thomaston Watertown Middlebury Seymour Ansonia Derby Shelton Waterbury The census block groups in red represent EJ communities in the Naugatuck Valley. These census block groups score greater than one standard deviation above the mean on both the proportion of minorities residing in the blockgroup and the proportion of households making less than 1.5x the federal poverty level. Qualifying Factors 2 1 0 0482 Miles I Source: U.S. Census Bureau NVCOG staff Map : EJ Communities in the Naugatuck Valley COG,   EJ Communities EJ communities are census block groups where disproportionately large populations of minorities and low-income residents reside. The NVCOG’s planning and programming should consider all EJ populations regardless of their concentration to identify and rectify adverse and disparate impacts on these populations, however these EJ communities are areas of particular concern due to their concentrated need and have been identied for the location of benecial projects and program activities. The NVCOG’s identied EJ communities for FFY  are shown in red on Map  (page ).  A more detailed map of Waterbury and the identied EJ communities, overlayed with the existing neighborhood boundaries as dened by the City of Waterbury, is on page . Commuting & Work Patterns According to  ACS counts, , residents, or .% of the region’s population, resides in EJ communities. However, these communities are home to only , workers, or .% of the region’s workforce. Over a quarter of workers living in these communities work in the City of Waterbury, and the remainder work across Connecticut. Over the past decade, the population working in historic inner ring suburbs of Waterbury such as Watertown and Naugatuck have decreased, while the proportion working in Cheshire and New Haven has risen. About % of workers in identied EJ communities commute by transit, much higher than the region as a whole, but only % of households lack access to a vehicle. Over half of the working population is employed in just three industries: health care and social assistance, manufacturing, and retail trade. Compared to the region as a whole, there is a concentration of manufacturing, retail, and food services employment in these communities, and a lack of employment in education. Educational Attainment & Housing The population in these communities is somewhat less educated than the region at large, with .% of the population over  attaining a college degree compared with .% in the NVCOG region’s urban core, .% regionally and .% statewide.  These education rates have been steady over the past ve years, compared with increases in average educational attainment regionally and statewide. Occupied housing units in these communities are .% renter- occupied, compared with .% renter-occupied regionally. Additionally, .% of all housing units in these communities are vacant, which is dramatically higher than the .% vacancy rate in the City of Waterbury and the .% vacancy rate regionally. 2 The most up-to-date EJ Communities may be found in the Appendix. 3 Naugatuck Valley Regional Prole 2015 Who we are: Top 5 Places of Work . Waterbury .% . Cheshire .% . Watertown .% . Hartford .% . New Haven .% Top 5 Industries . Health Care .% . Manufacturing .% . Retail Trade .% . Admin & Support .% . Food Services .% . Educational Attainment Source: U.S. Census Bureau LEHD O-D Employment Statistics, 2014 Less Than High School 14.5% High School or equivalent 19.8% Some College or Associate 21.7% College Degree 15.6% Not Available (or under 29) 28.6%  Qualifying Factors 2 1 0 3 2 1 4 6 12 13 7 14 15 18 16 9 8 17 10 19 11 20 21 5 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 Waterville Fairmount Brookside Ind. Park Browns Meadows Overlook St. Margaret/Willow Pl.* Hillside Crownbrook New PAC North End Wolcott Road West End Brooklyn* Central Business District South End W.O.W.* Berkeley Heights Washington Hill East End Scott Road Capt. Neville Ind. Park Above is a detailed map of the FFY  EJ communities located in Waterbury, with an overlay of city- designated neighborhood boundaries. Many of these neighborhoods have neighborhood associations which discuss vital issues facing them at regular meetings. When planning for or programming projects that aect these regions, existing neighborhood organizations should be considered a primary resource for outreach. Neighborhoods with asterisks represent Neighborhood Revitalization Zones, a special state designation. Map : EJ Communities in Waterbury,   Partnerships The NVCOG will work to incorporate the needs of EJ communities and EJ populations in all aspects of its planning and programming activities. To better understand the needs and potential eects of the NVCOG’s activities on these neighborhoods and populations, it is helpful to build relationships with community leaders and representative organizations. The NVCOG has begun building a list of agencies and community organizations for direct public outreach regarding the NVCOG’s activities in their neighborhoods or aecting their constituencies: Organization Name Brooklyn Neighborhood Association CT Department of Public Health DEEP Environmental Justice Program Main Street Waterbury Hispanic Coalition of Greater Waterbury Huntington Woods Apartments Greater Waterbury United Way Lakewood Neighborhood Association Naugatuck Valley Health District Northwest Workforce Investment Board Valley United Way Waterbury Neighborhood Council Waterville Community Club Walnut-Orange-Walsh NRZ In addition to the above list, the NVCOG maintains a mailing list with a broad range of organizations, non-prots, and stakeholders which should be notied of the NVCOG’s programs and plans. Transit Dependence The NVCOG, in its activities as an MPO and a COG, participates in transportation planning and programming for populations which depend on publicly-funded transportation for accessibility. These populations are typically not included as EJ populations. For reference, the NVCOG has identied the locations of transit-dependent populations in the region using two metrics: the proportion of the working population who commute via means other than a private automobile, and the proportion of households lacking access to an automobile. These two measures provide very dierent pictures because a large number of retirement communities and senior centers are located in rural areas and transit options vary across the NVCOG region. Maps of these populations may be found in the Appendix.  Environmental Justice Analyses The key means of implementing the NVCOG Environmental Justice Policy is to incorporate economic justice impact analyses into projects and programs. To ensure these analyses are performed accurately and consistently, the NVCOG has created the following standards for the project- and program-level analyses. When considering impacts of a program or project, all phases must be considered from staging through construction to completion and review. Project-Level Environmental Justice Analysis Because projects are generally more localized than programs, project impacts on EJ communities are more tangible and measureable than program impacts. As such, a quantitative method is often the best method to analyze projected and actual impacts. When picking a unit of spatial analysis, such as a census tract or census block, consistently use that unit when identifying populations negatively and positively impacted. . Spatially identify project area(s). Outline the spatial boundaries of the project including all staging areas. . Spatially identify population(s) most negatively impacted by project. Using the most current spatial and demographic data available, identify and spatially outline the populations and neighborhoods which may be most negatively impacted by the staging, construction, and post-construction phases of the project. Negative impacts could include, but are not limited to, the following: noise, pollution, increased travel times, decreased accessibility, increased cost of parking or transit fares, and other environmental side eects. . Spatially identify population(s) most positively impacted by project. Similar to step , use data to identify and spatially outline populations and neighborhoods which may benet from the project. Positive impacts include, but are not limited to, the following: decreased travel times, increased sales for local businesses in the construction area, increased choices of transit modes, and increased variety of public transit destinations. . Evaluate if any of the positively and negatively impacted populations are also EJ populations. Use the grid below to determine if the spatially identied population(s) are also EJ popluations using the following demographic characteristics: Figure . Population Characteristics Minority Non-Minority Low Income 7 7 Non-Low Income 7 ; If the answer is “yes,” proceed to step  to learn from the community about the project’s potential positive and negative impacts. If the answer is “no,” then no further EJ analysis is needed. Record the work you have done thus far and le it with the project documentation. Implementation  . Learn more about the potential negative impacts to EJ populations. Engage EJ populations through multiple communication channels to better understand the potential negative and positive impacts of the proposed project, and to identify potential mitigating actions or project alterations. Methods to engage communities are detailed in the NVCOG Public Outreach Policy . . Identify any disparate impacts on EJ populations. Compare the negative impacts on EJ populations with those on non-EJ populations to discern if EJ populations are disproportionately-negatively aected. Compare these negative impacts with positive impacts on EJ communities. . Identify mitigating actions or project alterations to be included in the project. Consider the mitigating actions described by the aected EJ populations and identied by NVCOG sta. Mitigating actions should directly relate to the disparate impacts, e.g. moving a staging location, providing alternate access for the duration of a project, or making parallel investments in transit improvements. Keep in mind that the reallocation of project resources to a more benecial project for the EJ population may also be considered a mitigating action. Determine which mitigating actions the project will include and document them. Program-Level Environmental Justice Analysis The impacts of the NVCOG’s programs and planning initiatives at the program level are region-wide rather than localized, and thus more dicult to quantify. A more qualitative approach is recommended? alongside a spatial analysis?to identify and to better understand the positive and negative impacts of programs on EJ populations. When identifying populations, be certain to use the same spatial unit for those who may be aected positively, negatively, or both. . Identify the program’s past and anticipated positive impacts and beneciaries. Identify anticipated program benets and the populations which may be aected. If the program has resulted in the development of projects and/or improvements, list them and the populations who have benetted. . Identify the program’s past and anticipated negative impacts and the populations aected. Detail any existing and projected negative impacts and identify the populations aected. . Evaluate if any of the positively and negatively impacted populations are also EJ populations. Use the grid below to determine if the spatially identied population(s) are also EJ populations using the following demographic characteristics: Figure . Population Characteristics Minority Non-Minority Low Income 7 7 Non-Low Income 7 ; If the answer is “yes,” proceed to step . If the answer is “no,” then no further EJ analysis is needed. Record the work you have done thus far and le it with the program documentation. . Learn more about the program’s past and anticipated negative impacts from EJ populations. Engage EJ populations to better understand the potential negative and positive impacts of the proposed program, and to identify potential mitigating actions or program alterations. Methods to engage the communities are detailed in the NVCOG Public Outreach Policy .  . Identify and document mitigating actions and program improvements. Consider the mitigating actions described by the aected EJ populations and identifed by NVCOG sta. Mitigating actions should directly relate to the negative impacts, e.g. better outreach to eected populations, redirection of program priorities, a change in the structure of advisory committees, or other actions which could provide a greater voice and benet to EJ populations. Transportation Improvement Programs (TIPs) As the planning agency hosting the Central Naugatuck Valley Region MPO and cooperating with the Greater Bridgeport?Valley MPO, the NVCOG prepares a Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) every four () years, programming federal-, state-, and local-aid transportation improvements. The TIP outlines the scheduling of transportation projects. All line-items in the TIP must be individually analyzed using the EJ Analysis processes outlined on pages -. In addition, the TIP as a whole should be analyzed using these processes to discern whether the net eect of the program has a disproportionately negative impact on EJ populations. Because the TIP is essentially a nancial document, the EJ analysis process should include a calculation of whether EJ communities are receiving their fair share of public investment. “Fair share” is dened as a share of dollars which positively impact EJ communities in proportion to their share of the regional population: EJ Communities Population = , = .% Total Regional Population ,  To calculate whether the TIP conforms to this fair share determination, total the programmed dollars which positively impact EJ communities, subtract programmed dollars which negatively impact EJ communities, and divide by the total number of programmed dollars to calculate the EJ communities’ share of TIP dollars: Positive Impacts ($) – Negative Impacts ($) = EJ Communities Share Total Programmed ($) In addition to the TIP for the MPOs, the NVCOG and its constituent MPOs also cooperate with the State of Connecticut to develop the Statewide Transportation Improvement Plan (STIP). Since the TIP and the STIP are concurrently developed, all projects that are nalized in the STIP must follow the same EJ analyses. The next complete TIP for the NVCOG is scheduled for FY . TIP Amendments While the TIP is written every four years, changes in the scope or cost of projects occur frequently. These changes require an amendment to the TIP. Reprioritizations at the state level may also require an amendment to the TIP. The TIP amendment process is necessarily quicker than the TIP development process, but TIP amendments should be vetted through an environmental justice analysis to identify any disproportionate impacts which may arise and whether mitigating actions are necessary. When TIP amendments are requested by the state, any identifed disproportionate impacts on EJ populations must be negotiated with the state before approving the TIP amendment.  Unied Planning Work Programs (UPWPs) The Unied Planning Work Program (UPWP) is similar to the TIP in that it outlays projects the NVCOG shall undertake within a given period (one year), but the UPWP deals more directly with planning processes and deliverables. While work done under the UPWP is more dicult to quantify, and its impacts are less immediately apparent, it is important to consider environmental justice during the development and implementation of the UPWP. To incorporate the principles of environmental justice into the UPWP, the following procedures are recommended: . Incorporate environmental justice analyses into large or impactful deliverables . Incorporate environmental justice training for sta . Hold UPWP public hearings or public informational meetings in EJ communities Long-Range Transportation Plans (LRTPs) The NVCOG is required to create Long-Range Transportation Plans (LRTPs) for the two MPOs in its planning region. LRTPs typically have twenty () year horizons, and are used to identify projects for inclusion in the TIP and the UPWP. Additionally, LRTPs serve to identify a unied vision for the direction of transportation planning and infrastructure in the region. LRTPs must conform to the principles of environmental justice by proactively considering the needs of communities and populations of concern, and negative impacts on those communities by otherwise well-intended projects and programs. As such, the LRTP should contain an environmental justice analysis of proposed improvements. Other Planning & Programs The NVCOG will work to implement environmental justice principles in other aspects of its planning work. All NVCOG planning sta will be trained in environmental justice analyses and given reference materials. Additionally, all public participation requirements make explicit mention of environmental justice and the need to give additional consideration to EJ populations and communities during all phases of planning: plan development, outreach, and publication. Updates to This Policy Updates to this environmental justice policy must conform to the NVCOG Public Outreach Policy . This document qualies as a Minor Project under the provisions of that policy. For this policy, a minor technical update includes adjustments to the list of Partnerships and their contact information, adjustments to match changes in other relevant policies which do not aect the principles or goals of this policy, and general technical alterations.  Current EJ Communities (ed. //) A: FY  EJ Communities A: FFY  EJ Communities – Waterbury detail A: FFY  EJ Communities – Bristol detail A: Minority Population,  A: Low-Income Population,   Additional Maps (ed. ..) A: Transit Commuters,  A: Vehicle Access,  A: Elderly Population,   Program EJ Analysis Form  Project EJ Analysis Form  NVCOG Resolution Appendices A Bethlehem Woodbury Southbury Oxford Beacon Falls Naugatuck Prospect Cheshire Wolcott Bristol Plymouth Thomaston Watertown Middlebury Seymour Ansonia Derby Shelton Waterbury The census block groups in red represent EJ communities in the Naugatuck Valley. These census block groups score greater than one standard deviation above the mean on both the proportion of minorities residing in the blockgroup and the proportion of households making less than 1.5x the federal poverty level. Qualifying Factors 2 1 0 Previously ID’d Communities 0482 Miles I Source: U.S. Census Bureau NVCOG staff Map A: FFY  NVCOG EJ Communities ( data) A Qualifying Factors 2 1 0 Additional Communities* 3 2 1 4 14 15 17 12 19 18 24 20 10 11 21 9 23 8 26 27 13 7 6 5 25 16 22 Above is a detailed map of the FFY  EJ communities located in Waterbury, with an overlay of city-designated neighborhood boundaries. Many of these neighborhoods have neighborhood associations which discuss vital issues facing them at regular meetings. When planning for or programming projects that aect these regions, existing neighborhood organizations should be considered a primary resource for outreach. Neighborhoods with asterisks represent Neighborhood Revitalization Zones, a special state designation. *Additional Communities were identied for FFY . Map A: EJ Communities in Waterbury,  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Berkeley Heights Boulevard Bouley Manor Brooklyn* Brookside Ind. Pk. Browns Meadows Capt. Neville Ind. Pk. Central Bus. District Crownbrook East End Fairmount Hill Street Hillside Hopeville Lakewood New PAC North End Overlook Scott Road South End Town Plot 23 24 25 26 27 Washington Hill Waterville West End Willow Plaza* Wolcott Road W.O.W. A Qualifying Factors 2 1 0 Above is a detailed map of the FFY  EJ communities located in Bristol. Bristol does not have as clearly-dened neighborhoods as Waterbury (Map A). When planning for or programming projects that aect these communities, NVCOG sta should work with the City of Bristol to identify grassroots organizations and other means with which to coordinate with aected residents. Map A: EJ Communities in Bristol,  1 Huntington Woods 1 A Bethlehem Woodbury Southbury Oxford Beacon Falls Naugatuck Prospect Cheshire Wolcott Bristol Plymouth Thomaston Watertown Middlebury Seymour Ansonia Derby Shelton Waterbury Mean: 28.2% Standard Deviation: 26.1% Universe: Individuals Red census block groups have a proportion of racial or ethnic minority populations >1 standard deviation than the mean. Minority Population 80% 54% 28% 2% 0482 Miles I Source: U.S. Census Bureau ACS 2015 Table B03002 Map A: Minority Population in the Naugatuck Valley COG,  A Bethlehem Woodbury Southbury Oxford Beacon Falls Naugatuck Prospect Cheshire Wolcott Bristol Plymouth Thomaston Watertown Middlebury Seymour Ansonia Derby Shelton Waterbury Mean: 20.1% Standard Deviation: 18.7%% Universe: Individuals Red census block groups have a proportion of low-income populations >1 standard deviation from the mean. Low-Income Population 76% 57% 39% 20% 1% 0482 Miles I Source: U.S. Census Bureau ACS 2015 Table C17002 Map A: Low-Income Residents in the Naugatuck Valley COG,  A Bethlehem Woodbury Southbury Oxford Beacon Falls Naugatuck Prospect Cheshire Wolcott Bristol Plymouth Thomaston Watertown Middlebury Seymour Ansonia Derby Shelton Waterbury Mean: 2.3% Standard Deviation: 4.5% Universe: Workers Age 16+ Commute by Transit 20.2% 15.7% 11.3% 6.8% 2.3% 0482 Miles I Source:U.S. Census Bureau ACS 2015 Table B08301 Map A: Workers Commuting by Transit in the Naugatuck Valley,  A Bethlehem Woodbury Southbury Oxford Beacon Falls Naugatuck Prospect Cheshire Wolcott Bristol Plymouth Thomaston Watertown Middlebury Seymour Ansonia Derby Shelton Waterbury Mean: 10.0% Standard Deviation: 12.2% Universe: Households No Access to a Vehicle 59% 47% 34% 22% 10% 0482 Miles I Source:U.S. Census Bureau ACS 2015 Table B25045 Map A: Households Lacking Vehicle Access in the Naugatuck Valley,  A Bethlehem Woodbury Southbury Oxford Beacon Falls Naugatuck Prospect Cheshire Wolcott Bristol Plymouth Thomaston Watertown Middlebury Seymour Ansonia Derby Shelton Waterbury % of Population >65 Years 43% 34% 25% 16% 7% 0482 Miles I Source: U.S. Census Bureau ACS 2015 Table B01001 Map A: Elderly Population in the Naugatuck Valley,     bb                                                                                                                            b   b 0                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               ?????????? ???????????????b?????????????b  ??????????????? ??????????????????? ???????????b??????????????????b???????    bb                                                                                                                         b  b                                                     0                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              ????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????? ???????????????????????????????????b???????? ??????????????????? ??? ?????????????????

Politíca de justicia ambiental

Pol?tica de justicia ambiental El Consejo de Gobierno del Valle de Naugatuck Comit? ejecuto  Neil O’Leary, Mayor, Waterbury  Mark Lauretti, Mayor, Shelton  Ken Cockayne, Mayor, Bristol  Tom Dunn, Mayor, Wolcott  Leonard Assard, First Selectman, Bethlehem  Chris Bielik, First Selectman, Beacon Falls  Kurt Miller, First Selectman, Seymour  Ed Mone, First Selectman, Thomaston Personal  Rick Dunne, Executive Director  Mark C. Nielsen, Director of Planning  Trish Bauer, Oce & Financial Manager  Arthur Bogen, Brownelds Consultant  Aaron Budris, Senior Regional Planner  Max Tanguay-Colucci, Regional Planner  John DiCarlo, Municipal Shared Services Coordinator  Christian Meyer, Supervising Transportation Planner  Benjamin Muller, Transportation Planner*  Mark Pandol, Transit Capital Administrator  Glenda Prentiss, GIS Program Coordinator  Lauren Rizzo, Administrative Assistant  Joanna Rogalski, Regional Planner / Emergency Management*  Karen Svetz, P.E., Regional Transportation Engineer * indica autores principales Fuentes de copias  Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments  Leavenworth Street, rd Floor Waterbury, CT   Phone: (203) 757-0535  Email: nvcog@nvcogct.org  Website: www.nvcogct.org Expresiones de gratitud  Todos mapas y fotos por parte del personal NVCOG. EN Translations available by request. ES Traducciones disponibles bajo petici?n. IT Traduzioni disponibili su richiesta. PL Tumaczenia dostpne na zam?wienie. PT Tradu??es dispon?veis mediante solicita – ??o. SQ P?rkthime n? dispozicion me k?rkes?. ZH |?}F?~???~ ??   Declaraci?n de misi?n El Consejo de Gobierno del Valle de Naugatuck (NVCOG), una regi?n en la zona central occidental de Connecticut, compuesto por diecinueve () municipalidades, est ? cometido a lograr la participaci?n plena, justa y signicativa de las poblaciones minoritarias y de bajos ingresos en el proceso del transporte p?blico, uso de la tierra, desarrollo econ?mico y planicaci?n ambiental. Para satisfacer este cometido, el NVCOG ha incorporado los principios de justicia ambiental (JA) a su proceso de planicaci?n, programaci?n y toma de decisiones. ? Qu? es la justicia ambiental? La justicia ambiental es la pol?tica y la pr?ctica que requiere que una agencia identique y se afronte a los efectos ambientales o de la salud p?blica altamente desproporcionados o adversos de sus programas, pol?ticas y actividades en las poblaciones minoritarias y de bajos ingresos. Tambi?n requiere que se identiquen estrategias y t?cnicas para la integraci?n signicativa de dichas poblaciones que cumplen con las necesidades de la justicia ambiental. Para avanzar el cometido de NVCOG a la pr?ctica de la justicia ambiental, se seguir?n los siguientes principios orientativos.  evitar, minimizar o mitigar los efectos ambientales o de la salud p?blica altamente desproporcionados o adversos en las poblaciones minoritarias o de bajos ingresos;  asegurarse de la plena y justa participaci?n de todas las comunidades potencialmente afectadas en el proceso de planicaci?n y toma de decisiones; y  evitar la negaci?n de, reducci?n en, o retraso signicativo de la entrega de prestaciones a las poblaciones minoritarias o de bajos ingresos.  La aplicabilidad de esta pol?tica. Las provisiones de la justicia ambiental descritas en esta pol?tica se aplican a cada fase del proceso de planicaci?n y toma de decisi?n del NVCOG, independiente de la fuente de los fondos. Esta pol?tica tambi?n se aplica a las actividades de todas aquellas entidades usando fondos o recintos del NVCOG. M?s, esta pol?tica se aplica a todas las acciones de las actividades de la Central Naugatuck Valley MPO y NVCOG en nombre de la Greater Bridgeport?Valley MPO. Cuando los requisitos de las fuentes de fondos o los socios dieren de los de esta pol?tica, el NVCOG implementar? el requisito m?s estricto. La implementaci?n de esta pol?tica. Los an?lisis de la justicia ambiental a nivel de proyectos y programas son los medios principales mediante los cuales el NVCOG implementa esta pol?tica de JA. Los est?ndares y pasos de orientaci?n para el an?lisis de la JA se encuentran en la p?gina  de esta declaraci?n pol?tica. 1 FHWA Environmental Justice FAQ ( http://www.fhwa.dot/gov/environmental/environmental_justice_faq/index.cfm ) Introducci?n  Consejo de gobiernos (COG) El rol del NVCOG como consejo de gobiernos (o consejo) est? denido por los Estatutos Generales de Connecticut cap?tulo  ? -i al ? -u. El cuerpo de toma de decisiones del NVCOG es su Consejo de Funcionarios Titulares Electos (CEOs) de cada municipalidad, o miembro, de la regi?n de planicaci?n. Las estructuras gobernando la toma de decisiones del Consejo est?n denidas por los estatutos de la organizaci?n. El Consejo supervisa las cuestiones de la planicaci?n regional y la colaboraci?n de servicios municipales, a incluir las prioridades del transporte p?blico de las regiones MPO vecinas (pr?xima secci?n). Como consejo de gobiernos, la responsabilidad principal del NVCOG es la redacci?n de un documento de planicaci?n regional denominado Regional Plan of Conservation and Development (POCD). El POCD regional hace recomendaciones y le informa al POCD estatal en cuanto a ?el uso de la tierra, la vivienda, las autopistas y carreteras principales, los puentes, los aeropuertos, los parques, los parques infantiles, las ?reas de recreo, las escuelas, las instituciones p?blicas, los servicios p?blicos, la agricultura y otras cuestiones que ser?n beneciosas para el ?rea.? (Estatutos Generales de Connecticut cap?tulo  ? -a). Las normas del acercamiento p?blico durante el proceso de redacci?n de los POCD tambi?n est?n denidos en este mismo estatuto. METROPOLITAN SOUTH CENTRAL NORTHEASTERN SOUTHEASTERN CAPITOL REGION New London Windsor Locks Ansonia Beacon Falls Derby West Haven Wethers- field Thomaston Plainville East Haven New Britain Old Saybrook Middle- field Newing- ton Deep River Cromwell Rocky Hill East Granby North Canaan East Hartford Bridge- water West- brook Naugatuck Sprague Bridge- port Prospect Wood- bridge Seymour New Haven West Hartford Middle- bury North Haven New Canaan Essex Darien Andover Bethlehem North Branford Marl- borough Ne w Fairfield South Windsor Brookfield East Windsor Scot- land Strat- ford Hartford Bolton Westport Clinton Columbia Plymouth Lisbon Franklin Chaplin Bloomfield Sherman Old Lyme Weston Trumbull East Hampton Norwalk Hampton Watertown Southington Killing- worth Milford East Lyme Eastford Willington Sterling Cheshire Middletown Voluntown Hamden Stamford Madison Chester Orange Vernon Manchester Bethel Branford Bethany Putnam Farmington Wolcott Bozrah Morri s Waterbury Meriden Durham Portland Windham New Hartford Barkhamsted Burlington Winchester Roxbury Harwinton Colebrook Brooklyn Canton Washington Monroe North Stonington Ridgefield Norwich Waterford Somers Warren Woodbury Simsbury Wallingford Canterbury Windsor Fairfield Stonington Redding Easton Southbury Ellington Torrington Hartland Preston Bristol Shelton Canaan Wilton Avon Griswold Coventry East Haddam Berlin Salem Glastonbury Groton Greenwi ch Thompson Colchester Plainfield Oxford Union Mansfield Enfield Ledyard Hebron Montville Ashford Pomfret Danbury Cornwall Tolland Haddam Granby New Milford Suffield Goshen Woodstock Lyme Guilford Lebanon Norfolk Newtown Killingly Litchfield Salisbury Stafford Sharon Kent NAUGATUCK VALLEY WESTERN NORTHWEST HILLS LOWER CONNECTICUT RIVER VALLEY I 010205 Miles Source: OPM, State of Connecticut, U.S. Census Bureau 2010 Mapa : Consejos de gobiernos en Connecticut Miembros del NVCOG  Ansonia  Beacon Falls  Bethlehem  Bristol  Cheshire  Derby  Middlebury  Naugatuck  Oxford  Plymouth  Prospect  Seymour  Shelton  Southbury  Thomaston  Waterbury  Watertown  Wolcott  Woodbury  Organizaciones metropolitanas de planicaci?n (MPO) Como agencia acogedora de una organizaci?n metropolitana de planicaci?n (MPO), el NVCOG funciona como el Central Naugatuck Valley MPO y colabora con el Greater Bridgeport and Valley MPO en los procesos de la planicaci?n del transporte p?blico regional y los programas de mejoras a la infraestructura para las dos regiones de las antemencionadas MPOs. Las MPOs est?n autorizadas por las normas federales, organizadas por municipalidades como regiones y designadas por el gobernador. Las MPOs realizan la planicaci?n del transporte p?blico y apoyan el programa de mejoras al transporte p?blico a nombre de sus comunidades constituyentes. El NVCOG ?nicamente acoge el Central Naugatuck Valley MPO (CNVMPO) y como tal todas las actividades del CNVMPO han de conformarse a esta pol?tica de participaci?n p?blica. El CNVMPO comparte las responsabilidades de acogimiento con MetroCOG y RPO de la zona metropolitana de Bridgeport, de  municipalidades miembros en el Greater Bridgeport and Valley MPO: Ansonia, Derby, Seymour y Shelton. Las actividades del NVCOG que incorporan estas cuatro municipalidades han de conformarse a la pol?tica de participaci?n p?blica, pero las actividades relacionadas a la MPO en estas cuatro municipalidades han de conformarse a ambos el GBVMPO Public Participation Plan y esta pol?tica, imponiendo los requisitos m?s estrictos en caso de un conicto. METROPOLITAN SOUTH CENTRAL NORTHEASTERN SOUTHEASTERN CAPITOL REGION New London Windsor Locks Ansonia Beacon Falls Derby West Haven Wethers- field Thomaston Plainville East Haven New Britain Old Saybrook Middle- field Newing- ton Deep River Cromwell Rocky Hill East Granby North Canaan East Hartford Bridge- water West- brook Naugatuck Sprague Bridge- port Prospect Wood- bridge Seymour New Haven West Hartford Middle- bury North Haven New Canaan Essex Darien Andover Bethlehem North Branford Marl- borough Ne w Fairfield South Windsor Brookfield East Windsor Scot- land Strat- ford Hartford Bolton Westport Clinton Columbia Plymouth Lisbon Franklin Chaplin Bloomfield Sherman Old Lyme Weston Trumbull East Hampton Norwalk Hampton Watertown Southington Killing- worth Milford East Lyme Eastford Willington Sterling Cheshire Middletown Voluntown Hamden Stamford Madison Chester Orange Vernon Manchester Bethel Branford Bethany Putnam Farmington Wolcott Bozrah Morri s Waterbury Meriden Durham Portland Windham New Hartford Barkhamsted Burlington Winchester Roxbury Harwinton Colebrook Brooklyn Canton Washington Monroe North Stonington Ridgefield Norwich Waterford Somers Warren Woodbury Simsbury Wallingford Canterbury Windsor Fairfield Stonington Redding Easton Southbury Ellington Torrington Hartland Preston Bristol Shelton Canaan Wilton Avon Griswold Coventry East Haddam Berlin Salem Glastonbury Groton Greenwi ch Thompson Colchester Plainfield Oxford Union Mansfield Enfield Ledyard Hebron Montville Ashford Pomfret Danbury Cornwall Tolland Haddam Granby New Milford Suffield Goshen Woodstock Lyme Guilford Lebanon Norfolk Newtown Killingly Litchfield Salisbury Stafford Sharon Kent NAUGATUCK VALLEY WESTERN NORTHWEST HILLS LOWER CONNECTICUT RIVER VALLEY I 010205 Miles Source: OPM, State of Connecticut, U.S. Census Bureau 2010 COG Boundaries MPO Boundaries Municipalities URBANIZED AREAS (CENSUS 2010) Bridgeport-Stamford, CT/NY Danbury, CT/NY Hartford, CT New Haven, CT Norwich-New London, CT/RI Springfield, MA/CT Waterbury, CT Worcester, MA/CT Urban Clusters Mapa : MPOs y Urbanized Areas en Connecticut CNVMPO Miembros  Beacon Falls  Bethlehem  Bristol  Cheshire  Middlebury  Naugatuck  Oxford  Plymouth  Prospect  Southbury  Thomaston  Waterbury  Watertown  Wolcott  Woodbury GBVMPO Miembros  Ansonia  Derby  Seymour  Shelton  Bethlehem Woodbury Southbury Oxford Beacon Falls Naugatuck Prospect Cheshire Wolcott Bristol Plymouth Thomaston Watertown Middlebury Seymour Ansonia Derby Shelton Waterbury Mean: 27.4% Standard Deviation: 21.0% Universe: Individuals Red census block groups have a proportion of racial or ethnic minority populations >1 standard deviation than the mean. Minority Population 90% 69% 48% 27% 6% 0482 Miles I Source: U.S. Census Bureau ACS 2014 Table B03002 Mapa : Poblaciones minor?as en el NVCOG,  Media: 27.4% Desviaci?n est?ndar: 21.0% Universo: Individuous Los grupos de bloques de censos rojos tienen una proporci?n de poblaciones de minor?as raciales o ?tnicas >1 desviaci?n est?ndar por encima de la media Fuente: U.S. Census Bureau ACS 2014 Table B03002 Poblaciones minor?as  Las poblaciones de justicia ambiental est?n descritas en la orden ejecutiva  y est?n compuestas por poblaciones minoritarias, poblaciones de bajos ingresos, o ambas, Para identicar la ubicaci?n de dichas poblaciones, el NVCOG utiliza los datos de los grupos bloque m?s recientes recopilados por el American Community Survey y publicados por la Ocina del Censo de los Estados Unidos. Minor?as El NVCOG ha encontrado concentraciones de minor?as raciales y ?tnicas en la ciudad de Waterbury (mapa ). Muchos grupos bloque del censo a nivel regional tienen proporciones elevadas de poblaciones minoritarias, con una proporci?n media del ,%. M?s de la mitad de los grupos bloque de Waterbury son minoritarios – en los que la poblaci?n est? compuesta por menos del cincuenta por cien (%) de blancos no hispanos. (a nivel regional las minor?as raciales y ?tnicas constituyen el ,% de la poblaci?n). De la poblaci?n regional, el ,% (.) se identican como hispanos o latinos, mientras que el ,% (.) se identican como negro o afro-americano y el ,% se identican como asi?ticos. Blancos no hispanos Hispanos o latinos Negro o afro-americano Asi?ticos Alguna otra raza 14.7% 6.4% 2.5% 74.2% 2.1% Poblaciones minoritarias en el NVCOG,  Las poblaciones de justicia ambiental  Bethlehem Woodbury Southbury Oxford Beacon Falls Naugatuck Prospect Cheshire Wolcott Bristol Plymouth Thomaston Watertown Middlebury Seymour Ansonia Derby Shelton Waterbury Mean: 19.4% Standard Deviation: 14.2% Universe: Individuals Red census block groups have a proportion of low-income populations >1 standard deviation from the mean. Low-Income Population 62% 48% 34% 19% 5% 0482 Miles I Source: U.S. Census Bureau ACS 2014 Table C17002 Mapa : Poblaciones de bajos ingresos en el Naugatuck Valley COG,  Media: 19.4% Desviaci?n est?ndar: 14.2% Universo: Individuous Los grupos de bloques de censos rojos tienen una proporci?n de poblaciones de bajos ingresos >1 desviaci?n est?ndar por encima de la media Fuente: U.S. Census Bureau ACS 2014 Table C17002 Poblaciones de bajos ingresos  Bajos ingresos El NVCOG dene a los residentes de ?bajos ingresos? como los miembros de un hogar con unos ingresos medianos menos del ,x del umbral federal de la pobreza, que depende del n?mero de personas en el hogar. Por ejemplo, la composici?n hogare?a m?s com?n en el COG del valle de Naugatuck es una pareja casada con un solo hijo. El gobierno federal dene a esta familia como viviendo a o por debajo del umbral de la pobreza si sus ingresos anuales son iguales a o menos que $.. El umbral de bajos ingresos del NVCOG multiplicar?a esta cifra por , dando como resultado un umbral de bajos ingresos de ingresos hogare?os anuales de $.. Las poblaciones de bajos ingresos est?n concentradas en la zona central de Waterbury (mapa ), sin embargo, esta concentraci?n no es tan pronunciada como la de la poblaci?n minoritaria. Tambi?n existen varios grupos bloque del censo en Ansonia y Bristol con una mayor?a de sus residentes por debajo del umbral de bajos ingresos del NVCOG. De . individuos en la regi?n, . (,%) est?n por debajo el umbral de bajos ingresos del NVCOG, . (,%) est?n por debajo del umbral de pobreza federal, y . (,%) est?n por debajo de la mitad del umbral de pobreza federal. (Seg?n el ejemplo ante citado, la mitad del umbral de pobreza federal representa familias de dos padres y un solo hijo con menos de $. en ingresos anuales). La mediana de los ingresos hogare?os de la regi?n es $., mientras que la mediana de los ingresos familiares es $.. .x Umbral del gobierno federal . x Umbral del NVCOG . x .x Poblaciones de bajos ingresos en el NVCOG,  75.5% 1.9% 3.1% 5.5% 5.8% 3.3% 4.9%  Bethlehem Woodbury Southbury Oxford Beacon Falls Naugatuck Prospect Cheshire Wolcott Bristol Plymouth Thomaston Watertown Middlebury Seymour Ansonia Derby Shelton Waterbury The census block groups in red represent EJ communities in the Naugatuck Valley. These census block groups score greater than one standard deviation above the mean on both the proportion of minorities residing in the blockgroup and the proportion of households making less than 1.5x the federal poverty level. Qualifying Factors 2 1 0 0482 Miles I Source: U.S. Census Bureau NVCOG staff Mapa : Las comunidades JA en el NVCOG,  Los grupos de bloques censales en rojo representan las comunidades JA en el NVCOG. Estos grupos de bloques censales obtienen una puntuaci?n mayor que una desviaci?n est?ndar por encima de la media tanto en la proporci?n de minor?as que residen en el grupo de bloque como en la proporci?n de hogares con menos de 1,5x del umbral federal de la pobreza. Fuente: U.S. Census Bureau ACS 2014 Table C17002 Factores calicadores  Las comunidades JA Las comunidades JA son grupos bloques del censo en las que residen un n?mero desproporcionado de minor?as y residentes de bajos ingresos. La planicaci?n del NVCOG ha de considerar todas las poblaciones JA independiente de su concentraci?n para identicar y recticar los afectos desiguales sobre estas poblaciones, sin embargo, dichas comunidades JA son ?reas de inter?s particular a ra?z de su necesidad concentrada y han sido identicadas para la ubicaci?n de proyectos beneciosos. Las comunidades JA identicadas por el NVCOG se demuestran en rojo en el mapa  (p?gina ).  Un mapa m?s detallado de Waterbury y las comunidades JA, sobrepuesto con los lindes vecinales existentes seg?n denidos por la Ciudad de Waterbury se encentra en la p?gina . El desplazamiento y los patrones laborales Seg?n las estad?sticas del ACS del , . residentes o el ,% de la poblaci?n regional reside en una comunidad JA. Sin embargo, estas comunidades son hogar a solo . trabajadores, o el ,% de la fuerza laboral de la regi?n. M?s de una cuarta parte de los trabajadores viviendo en estas comunidades trabaja en la ciudad de Waterbury, y los dem?s trabajan en otra parte. En la ?ltima d?cada la poblaci?n trabajando en el c?rculo interno hist?rico de los suburbios de Waterbury ha disminuido, mientras que la proporci?n trabajando en Cheshire y New Haven ha aumentado. Un % de los trabajadores en las comunidades JA se desplazan a trabajar mediante el trasporte p?blico, m?s elevado que las cifras regionales, pero solo un % de hogares no tiene acceso a un carro. M?s de la mitad de la poblaci?n laboral trabaja en solo tres sectores: asistencia sanitaria y asistencia social, manufactura, y comercio minorista. Comparado a la regi?n, existe una concentraci?n de empleos de manufactura, comercio minorista y servicio alimenticio en estas comunidades, y una falta de empleo en el sector de la educaci?n. El nivel de escolarizaci?n y la vivienda Las poblaciones en estas comunidades tienen un nivel de escolarizaci?n algo inferior al de la regi?n en s?, con un ,% de la poblaci?n mayores de  a?os de edad con una educaci?n universitaria, comparado al ,% en la base urbana de la regi?n del NVCOG, ,% a nivel regional y ,% a nivel estatal. ( NVCOG Regional Prole  ) Estas tasas de niveles de escolarizaci?n se han mantenido estables a lo largo de los ?ltimos  a?os, comparado a un aumento en el nivel de escolarizaci?n medio a nivel regional y estatal. Las unidades de viviendas en estas comunidades lo est?n al ,% por inquilinos, comparado a el ,% ocupadas por inquilinos a nivel regional. Es m?s, el ,% de todas las unidades de viviendas en estas comunidades est?n vacantes, que es dram?ticamente mucho m?s elevado que la tasa de vacancias del ,% en la ciudad de Waterbury y la tasa de vacancias del ,% a nivel regional. 2 Las comunidades JA m?s actualizadas pueden encontrarse en el Ap?ndice. Quienes somos: Mejores lugares de trabajo . Waterbury .% . Cheshire .% . Watertown .% . Hartford .% . New Haven .% Principales industrias . Cuidado de la salud .% . Fabricaci?n .% . Venta al por menor .% . Administraci?n .% . Servicios de comida .% . El nivel de escolarizaci?n Fuente: U.S. Census Bureau LEHD O-D Employment Statistics, 2014 Menos que la educaci?n secundaria 14.5% Educaci?n secundaria o equivalente 19.8% Alg?n colegio o grado asociado 21.7% T?tulo universitario 15.6% No disponible o menos de 29 28.6%  Qualifying Factors 2 1 0 3 2 1 4 6 12 13 7 14 15 18 16 9 8 17 10 19 11 20 21 5 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 Waterville Fairmount Brookside Ind. Park Browns Meadows Overlook St. Margaret/Willow Pl.* Hillside Crownbrook New PAC North End Wolcott Road West End Brooklyn* Central Business District South End W.O.W.* Berkeley Heights Washington Hill East End Scott Road Capt. Neville Ind. Park Arriba se muestra un mapa detallado de las comunidades JA FY  ubicadas en Waterbury, con una superposici?n de los l?mites de barrio designados por la ciudad. Muchos de estos vecindarios tienen asociaciones de vecinos que discuten los temas vitales que enfrentan en reuniones regulares. Al planicar o programar proyectos que afectan a estas regiones, las organizaciones de vecindarios existentes deben ser consideradas un recurso primario para el alcance. Los barrios con asteriscos representan Neighborhood Revitalization Zones, una designaci?n estatal especial. Mapa : Las comunidades JA en Waterbury,  Factores calicadores  Socios El NVCOG trabajar? para incorporar las necesidades de las comunidades JA y poblaciones JA a todas las facetas de las actividades de programaci?n y planicaci?n. Para mejor entender las necesidades y efectos potenciales de las actividades del NVCOG en estos vecindarios y poblaciones, es benecioso fundar relaciones con los l?deres comunitarios y las organizaciones representativas. El NVCOG ha comenzado a componer una lista de agencias y organizaciones comunitarias para realizar un acercamiento p?blico directo sobre las actividades del NVCOG en sus vecindarios o afectando sus constituyentes. Nombre de la organizaci?n Brooklyn Neighborhood Association CT Department of Public Health DEEP Environmental Justice Program Main Street Waterbury Hispanic Coalition of Greater Waterbury Huntington Woods Apartments Greater Waterbury United Way Naugatuck Valley Health District Northwest Workforce Investment Board Valley United Way Waterbury Neighborhood Council Waterville Community Club Walnut-Orange-Walsh NRZ Adem?s de la lista anterior, el NVCOG mantiene una lista de distribuci?n amplia de organizaciones, ONGs, y partes interesadas que deber?an ser noticados de los programa y planes del NVCOG. La dependencia al transporte p?blico El NVCOG y sus actividades como ambos MPO y COG, participa en la planicaci?n y programaci?n para la poblaci?n que depende del transporte p?blico para desplazarse. T?picamente, estas poblaciones no est ?n incluidas en las poblaciones JA. Como referencia, el NVCOG ha identicado las ubicaciones geogr?cas de las poblaciones dependientes del transporte p?blico en la regi?n utilizando dos medidas: la proporci?n de la poblaci?n laboral que se desplaza al trabajo por medios distintos que los autom?viles privados, y la proporci?n de los hogares que no tienen acceso a un autom?vil. Estas dos medidas nos proporcionan dos panoramas muy diferentes ya que un gran n?mero de comunidades de jubilados y centros para la tercera edad est?n ubicados en ?rea rurales y las opciones del transporte p?blico var?an de municipio a municipio dentro de la regi?n NVCOG. Los mapas de estas poblaciones se encuentran en el Ap?ndice.  An?lisis de la justicia ambiental La clave para implementar la pol?tica de justicia ambiental del NVCOG es de incorporar un an?lisis del impacto de la justicia econ?mica en los proyectos y programas. Para asegurarse de realizar dichos an?lisis con precisi?n y consistencia, el NVCOG ha establecido los siguientes est?ndares para los an?lisis a nivel de proyecto y programa. Al considerar el impacto de un programa o proyecto, todas las fases han de ser consideradas desde el montaje inicial hasta la construcci?n hasta el n y la revisi?n. An?lisis de la justicia ambiental a nivel de proyecto Dado que, por regla general, los proyectos son m?s localizados que los programas, los impactos a las comunidades JA son m?s tangibles y medibles que los impactos de los programas. Como tal, un m?todo cuantitativo es a menudo el mejor m?todo para analizar los impactos previstos y actuales. Al seleccionar una unidad de an?lisis espacial, tal como ?rea del censo o bloque del censo, utilice esa unidad consistentemente al identicar las poblaciones impactadas negativa y positivamente. . Identique espacialmente el/los ?rea(s) del proyecto. Haga un bosquejo de los lindes del proyecto incluyendo las zonas de montaje. . Identique espacialmente las poblaciones m?s impactadas negativamente por el proyecto. Utilizando los datos espaciales y demogr?cos disponibles m?s actualizados, identique y espacialmente delinee las poblaciones o vecindarios que ser?n impactados m ?s negativamente por las fases del montaje, la construcci?n, y pos-construcci?n del proyecto. Los impactos negativos pueden incluir, pero sin limitarse a: el ruido, la contaminaci?n, un aumento en el tiempo de desplazamiento, una disminuci?n en la accesibilidad, un aumento en el costo del estacionamiento o las tarifas del trasporte p?blico y otros efectos secundarios ambientales. . Identique espacialmente las poblaciones m?s positivamente impactadas por el proyecto. Al igual que en el segundo paso, utilice datos para identicar y delinear las poblaciones o vecindarios que se beneciar?n del proyecto. Los impactos positivos pueden incluir, sin limitarse a: una disminuci?n en el tiempo de desplazamiento, un aumento en las ventas para los comerciantes locales en el ?rea de la construcci?n, un aumento en las opciones de tipos de transporte p?blico, y un aumento en la variedad de destinos del transporte p?blico. . Eval?e si algunas de las poblaciones impactadas o bien negativa o positivamente tambi?n son poblaciones JA. Utilice el gr?co a continuaci?n para determinar si las poblaciones espacialmente identicadas tambi?n son poblaciones JA. Utilice las siguientes caracter?sticas demogr?cas: Figura . Caracter?sticas demogr?cas Minoridad No minoridad Bajos ingresos 7 7 No bajos ingresos 7 ; De contestar ?s? siga al paso  para aprender de la comunidad los posibles impactos positivos y negativos del proyecto. Implementaci?n  De contestar ?no?, no se requiere m?s an?lisis JA. Documente el trabajo realizado hasta la fecha y arch?velo con la documentaci?n del proyecto. . Ases?rese sobre los posibles impactos negativos en la poblaci?n JA. Integre a las poblaciones JA mediante canales de comunicaci?n para mejor entender los posibles impactos negativos y positivos del proyecto propuesto, e identicar posibles acciones atenuantes o modicaciones al proyecto. Los m?todos para integrar a las comunidades se detallan en la Pol?tica de Acercamiento P?blico del NVCOG. . Identique cualquier impacto dispar a la poblaci?n JA. Compare los impactos negativos en la poblaci?n JA contra aquellos de la poblaci?n no JA para discernir si las poblaciones JA est?n siendo afectadas negativamente de forma desproporcional. Compare estos impactos negativos con los positivos en la comunidad JA. . Identique acciones atenuantes o modicaciones al proyecto a incluir en el proyecto. Considere las acciones atenuantes descritas por la poblaci?n JA afectada e identicadas por el personal del NVCOG. Las acciones atenuantes han de estar relacionadas a los impactos dispar, por ejemplo, moviendo la zona de montaje, proporcionando un acceso alternativo durante el transcurso del proyecto, o realizando inversiones paralelas en mejoras del transporte p?blico. Acu?rdese que la redistribuci?n de los recursos del proyecto a un proyecto m?s benecioso para la poblaci?n JA tambi?n puede considerase una acci?n atenuante. Determine qu? acciones atenuantes se incluir?n en el proyecto y docum?ntelas. An?lisis de la justicia ambiental a nivel de programa Los impactos de los programas e iniciativas de planicaci?n del NVCOG a nivel de programa son regionales en vez de locales, y por ende m?s dif?ciles de cuanticar. Se recomienda un enfoque m?s cualitativo ?junto con un an?lisis espacial?para identicar un mejor entendimiento de los impactos positivos y negativos de los programas en las poblaciones JA. Al identicar las poblaciones, aseg?rese de utilizar la misma unidad para aquellas que pudieran estar impactadas negativa o positivamente, o ambos. . Identique los impactos positivos y los beneciarios del programa en el pasado y los previstos. Identique los benecios previstos del programa y la poblaci?n que puede ser afectada. Si el programa ha conllevado al desarrollo de proyectos y/ o mejoras, enum?relas y las poblaciones que se han beneciado. . Identique los impactos negativos del programa en el pasado y los previstos y las poblaciones afectadas. Detalle cualquier impacto existente y previsto e identique la poblaci?n afectada. . Eval?e si algunas de las poblaciones impactadas o bien negativa o positivamente tambi?n son poblaciones JA. Utilice el graco a continuaci?n para determinar si las poblaciones espacialmente identicadas tambi?n son poblaciones JA. Utilice las siguientes caracter?sticas demogr?cas: Figura . Caracter?sticas demogr?cas Minoridad No minoridad Bajos ingresos 7 7 No bajos ingresos 7 ; De contestar ?s? siga al paso . De contestar ?no?, no se requiere m?s an?lisis JA. Documente el trabajo realizado hasta la fecha y arch?velo con la documentaci?n del proyecto.  . Ases?rese m?s sobre los posibles impactos del programa en el pasado o previstos en la poblaci?n JA. Integre a las poblaciones JA para mejor entender los posibles impactos negativos positivos del programa propuesto, y para identicar posibles acciones atenuantes o modicaciones al programa. Los m?todos para integrar a las poblaciones se enumeran en la Pol?tica de Acercamiento P?blico del NVCOG. . Identique y documente las acciones atenuantes y mejoras al programa. Considere las acciones atenuantes descritas por las poblaciones JA e identicadas por el personal del NVCOG. Las acciones atenuantes deben estar relacionadas directamente al impacto negativo, por ejemplo, mejor acercamiento para las poblaciones afectadas, redirecci?n de las prioridades del programa, un cambio en la estructura de las comisiones asesoras, u otras acciones que pudieran proporcionarles a las poblaciones afectadas una mayor participaci?n y m?s benecios. Programas de mejoras en el transporte p?blico (TIPs) Como agencia de planicaci?n acogiendo la Central Naugatuck Valley Region MPO y cooperando con el Greater Bridgeport Valley MPO, el NVCOG prepara un programa de mejoras al transporte p?blico (TIP) cada cuatro a ?os , programando la asistencia federal, estatal y local a las mejoras del transporte p?blico. La TIP define la programaci?n de los proyectos del transporte p?blico. Cada partida presupuestaria en la TIP ha de ser analizada individualmente utilizando el proceso de an?lisis JA detallado en las p?ginas - . Adem?s, la TIP en su totalidad ha de ser analizada utilizando estos procesos para discernir si el efecto neto del programa tiene un impacto desproporcionadamente negativo en las poblaciones JA. Dado que la TIP es b?sicamente un documento nanciero, el an?lisis JA ha de incluir un c?lculo de si las poblaciones JA est?n recibiendo su parte equitativa de la inversi?n p?blica. La ?parte equitativa? se dene como una parte de los fondos que impactan positivamente a las comunidades JA proporcional a la parte de la poblaci?n regional. Poblaci?n de las comunidades JA = , = .% Total de la poblaci?n regional ,  Para determinar si la TIP se ajusta a esta determinaci?n de parte equitativa, sume los fondos totales que impactan positivamente a las comunidades JA, reste los fondos que impactan negativamente a las comunidades JA, y divida por el total de fondos programados para as? calcular la parte de fondos TIP correspondientes a las comunidades JA. Impactos positivos ($) ? Impactos negativos ($) = Parte correspondiente a las communidades JA Total programado ($) Adem?s de la TIP para las MPO, el NVCOG y sus MPO constituyentes tambi?n cooperan con el estado de Connecticut para desarrollar el Plan de Mejoras del Transporte P?blico Estatal (STIP). Dado que la TIP y STIP se desarrollan simult?neamente todo proyecto nalizado en la STIP ha de seguir el mismo an?lisis JA. La pr?xima TIP completa para el NVCOG est? programada para el a?o scal . Enmiendas a la TIP En lo que la TIP se redacta cada cuatro a?os, los cambios en el alcance y costos del proyecto ocurren con frecuencia. Esto requiere que se enmiende la TIP. El volver a priorizar a nivel estatal puede que tambi?n requiera una enmienda a la TIP. El proceso de enmendar la TIP es m?s r?pido que el proceso de desarrollo de la TIP, sin embargo, las enmiendas a la TIP han de ser estudiadas a fondo mediante  un an?lisis de justicia ambiental para identicar cualquier impacto desproporcionado que pudieran surgir y en caso exista la necesidad de acciones atenuantes. Cuando el estado pide enmiendas a la TIP, cualquier impacto desproporcionado a las poblaciones JA se han de negociar con el estado antes de aprobar la enmienda a la TIP. Programas de trabajo de planicaci?n unicado El programa de trabajo de planicaci?n unicado (UPWP) es parecido a la TIP en que desembolsa los proyectos que el NVCOG comenzar? dentro de un periodo de tiempo dado (un a?o), pero el UPWP se enfoca m?s en el proceso de planicaci?n y los productos nales. Mientras que es m?s dif?cil cuanticar el trabajo realizado bajo el UPWP y sus impactos inmediatos son menos aparentes, es importante considerar la justicia ambiental durante el proceso de desarrollo e implementaci?n del UPWP. Para incorporar los principios de la justicia ambiental al UPWP, se recomiendan los siguientes procedimientos: . Incorporar el an?lisis de la justicia ambiental a los productos nales grandes o de gran impacto . Capacitar al personal en la justicia ambiental . Convocar sesiones p?blicas o reuniones p?blicas informativas en las comunidades JA. Planes para el transporte p?blico a largo plazo El NVCOG est? obligado a crear planes para el transporte p?blico a lago plazo (LRTP) para las MPO dentro de su regi?n. Los LRTPs t?picamente tienen horizontes de planicaci?n de  a?os, y se utilizan para identicar proyectos a incluir en la TIP y UPWP. M?s, los LRTPs sirven para identicar una visi?n para la planicaci?n del transporte p?blico y la infraestructura regional. Los LRTPs han de conformarse a los principios de la justicia ambiental al considerar de forma proactiva las necesidades de las comunidades y poblaciones de inter?s, y los impactos negativos en estas comunidades por los proyectos y programas bien intencionados. Como tal, el LRTP debe incluir un an?lisis de justicia ambiental de las mejoras propuestas. Planicaci?n y programas, otros El NVCOG trabajar? para implementar los principios de la justicia ambiental en otros aspectos de su labor de planicaci?n. Todo el personal del NVCOG recibir? capacitaci?n sobre el an?lisis de la justicia ambiental y materiales de referencia. M?s, todos los requisitos de participaci?n p?blica hacen menci?n expl?cita de la justicia ambiental y la necesidad de tener consideraciones adicionales con las poblaciones y comunidades JA durante todas las fases de planicaci?n: desarrollo del plan, acercamiento p?blico y publicaci?n. Actualizaciones a esta pol?tica Las actualizaciones a esta pol?tica de justicia ambiental han de conformarse a la Pol?tica de Acercamiento P?blico del NVCOG. Este documento califica como un Proyecto menor bajo las provisiones de es ta pol?tica. Para esta pol?tica, una actualizaci?n t?cnica menor incluye ajustes a la lista de socios y sus datos, ajustes para que los cambios en otras pol?ticas pertinentes que no afectan los principios o las metas de esta pol?tica correspondan, y alteraciones t?cnicas generales.  Comunidades JA actuales (ed. //) A: FY  comunidades JA A: FY  comunidades JA?Waterbury A: FY  comunidades JA?Bristol A: Poblaciones minorias,  A: Poblaciones de bajos ingresos,   Mapas adicionales (ed. //) A: Trabajadores que transitan por transito,  A: Hogares que caracen de acceso a un carro,  A: Poblaciones ancianas,   Formulario de an?lisis JA del programma (en)  Form ulario de an?lisis JA de proyectos (en)  Resoluci?n de NVCOG (en) Ap?ndices A Bethlehem Woodbury Southbury Oxford Beacon Falls Naugatuck Prospect Cheshire Wolcott Bristol Plymouth Thomaston Watertown Middlebury Seymour Ansonia Derby Shelton Waterbury The census block groups in red represent EJ communities in the Naugatuck Valley. These census block groups score greater than one standard deviation above the mean on both the proportion of minorities residing in the blockgroup and the proportion of households making less than 1.5x the federal poverty level. Qualifying Factors 2 1 0 Previously ID’d Communities 0482 Miles I Source: U.S. Census Bureau NVCOG staff Mapa A: Las comunidades JA en el NVCOG,  Los grupos de bloques censales en rojo representan las comunidades JA en el NVCOG. Estos grupos de bloques censales obtienen una puntuaci?n mayor que una desviaci?n est?ndar por encima de la media tanto en la proporci?n de minor?as que residen en el grupo de bloque como en la proporci?n de hogares con menos de 1,5x del umbral federal de la pobreza. Fuente: U.S. Census Bureau ACS 2015 Table C17002 Factores calicadores Previamente identicadas A Qualifying Factors 2 1 0 Additional Communities* Arriba se muestra un mapa detallado de las comunidades JA FY  ubicadas en Waterbury, con una superposici?n de los l?mites de barrio designados por la ciudad. Muchos de estos vecindarios tienen asociaciones de vecinos que discuten los temas vitales que enfrentan en reuniones regulares. Al planicar o programar proyectos que afectan a estas regiones, las organizaciones de vecindarios existentes deben ser consideradas un recurso primario para el alcance. Los barrios con asteriscos representan Neighborhood Revitalization Zones, una designaci?n estatal especial. Mapa A: Las comunidades JA en Waterbury,  Factores calicadores Previamente identicadas 3 2 1 4 14 15 17 12 19 18 24 20 10 11 21 9 23 8 26 27 13 7 6 5 25 16 22 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Berkeley Heights Boulevard Bouley Manor Brooklyn* Brookside Ind. Pk. Browns Meadows Capt. Neville Ind. Pk. Central Bus. District Crownbrook East End Fairmount Hill Street Hillside Hopeville Lakewood New PAC North End Overlook Scott Road South End Town Plot 23 24 25 26 27 Washington Hill Waterville West End Willow Plaza* Wolcott Road W.O.W. A Qualifying Factors 2 1 0 Arriba se muestra un mapa detallado de las comunidades JA FY  ubicadas en Bristol. Bristol no tiene barrios tan claramente denidos como Waterbury (Mapa A). Al planear o programar proyectos que afecten a estas comunidades, el personal de NVCOG debe trabajar con la Ciudad de Bristol para identicar organizaciones de base y otros medios con los cuales coordinarse con los residentes afectados. Mapa A: Las comunidades JA en Bristol,  Factores calicadores 1 Huntington Woods 1 A Bethlehem Woodbury Southbury Oxford Beacon Falls Naugatuck Prospect Cheshire Wolcott Bristol Plymouth Thomaston Watertown Middlebury Seymour Ansonia Derby Shelton Waterbury Mean: 27.4% Standard Deviation: 21.0% Universe: Individuals Red census block groups have a proportion of racial or ethnic minority populations >1 standard deviation than the mean. Minority Population 90% 69% 48% 27% 6% 0482 Miles I Source: U.S. Census Bureau ACS 2014 Table B03002 Mapa A: Poblaciones minor?as en el NVCOG,  Media: 28.2% Desviaci?n est?ndar: 26.1% Universo: Individuous Los grupos de bloques de censos rojos tienen una proporci?n de poblaciones de minor?as raciales o ?tnicas >1 desviaci?n est?ndar por encima de la media Fuente: U.S. Census Bureau ACS 2015 Table B03002 Poblaciones minor?as A Bethlehem Woodbury Southbury Oxford Beacon Falls Naugatuck Prospect Cheshire Wolcott Bristol Plymouth Thomaston Watertown Middlebury Seymour Ansonia Derby Shelton Waterbury Mean: 19.4% Standard Deviation: 14.2% Universe: Individuals Red census block groups have a proportion of low-income populations >1 standard deviation from the mean. Low-Income Population 62% 48% 34% 19% 5% 0482 Miles I Source: U.S. Census Bureau ACS 2014 Table C17002 Mapa A: Poblaciones de bajos ingresos en el Naugatuck Valley COG,  Media: 20.1% Desviaci?n est?ndar: 18.7% Universo: Individuous Los grupos de bloques de censos rojos tienen una proporci?n de poblaciones de bajos ingresos >1 desviaci?n est?ndar por encima de la media Fuente: U.S. Census Bureau ACS 2015 Table C17002 Poblaciones de bajos ingresos A Bethlehem Woodbury Southbury Oxford Beacon Falls Naugatuck Prospect Cheshire Wolcott Bristol Plymouth Thomaston Watertown Middlebury Seymour Ansonia Derby Shelton Waterbury Mean: 2.3% Standard Deviation: 4.5% Universe: Workers Age 16+ Commute by Transit 20.2% 15.7% 11.3% 6.8% 2.3% 0482 Miles I Source:U.S. Census Bureau ACS 2015 Table B08301 Mapa A: Trabajadores que transitan por tr?nsito en el NVCOG,  Media: 2.3% Desviaci?n est?ndar: 4.5% Universo: Trabajadores mayores de 16 Fuente: U.S. Census Bureau ACS 2015 Table B08301 Transitan por tr?nsito A Bethlehem Woodbury Southbury Oxford Beacon Falls Naugatuck Prospect Cheshire Wolcott Bristol Plymouth Thomaston Watertown Middlebury Seymour Ansonia Derby Shelton Waterbury Mean: 10.0% Standard Deviation: 12.2% Universe: Households No Access to a Vehicle 59% 47% 34% 22% 10% 0482 Miles I Source:U.S. Census Bureau ACS 2015 Table B25045 Mapa A: Hogares que carecen de acceso a un carro en el NVCOG,  Media: 10.0% Desviaci?n est?ndar: 12.2% Universo: Hogares Fuente: U.S. Census Bureau ACS 2015 Table B08301 Carecen de acceso a un carro A Bethlehem Woodbury Southbury Oxford Beacon Falls Naugatuck Prospect Cheshire Wolcott Bristol Plymouth Thomaston Watertown Middlebury Seymour Ansonia Derby Shelton Waterbury % of Population >65 Years 43% 34% 25% 16% 7% 0482 Miles I Source: U.S. Census Bureau ACS 2015 Table B01001 Mapa A: Poblaciones ancianas en el NVCOG,  Fuente: U.S. Census Bureau ACS 2015 Table B01001 Poblaciones ancianas    bb                                                                                                                                           b   b 0                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             ??????????  ???????????????b?????????????b  ??????????????? ??????????????????? ???????????b??????????????????b???????    bb                                                                                                                         b  b                                                     0                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              ????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????? ???????????????????????????????????b???????? ??????????????????? ??? ?????????????????

Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) Goal, FFYs 2017-2019

DBE_Goal_2016-2018_thumb.png

$3,513,567 236220, 237, 238, 323, 42, 51 $2,810,853.60 $702 ,713.40 $3,227,414 236220, 237, 238, 323, 42, 51 $2,581,931.20 $645,482.80 $164,881 323, 51, 541 $- $164,881 .00 $359,090 323, 51, 541 $- $359,090 .00 $2,400,000 236220, 237, 238, 323, 42, 51 $2,400,000 .00 $- $9,664, 952 $7,792,784.80 $1,872,167.20 ($200,000 ) ($161,258.63) ($38,741.37) $9,464,9 52 $7,631,526.17 $1,833,425.83 ( ����������� ��� ������ ������ ������ )= ( 17 180 )= 9.4% ( ���� .��� ����������� ������ ����������� )×( ������������ ��� . ������ ���������� )+( �� ��.��� ����������� ������ ����������� )×( ����������� ��� . ������ ���������� ) ( 7 99 )×80 .63% +( 10 81 )×19 .37% = ��.��%              可根据要求提供翻 译。 7/7/2016 Greater New Haven Community Events Calendar | DBE Public Hearing http://events.newhavenindependent.org/index.php/calendar/details/dbe_public_hearing/ 1/1 Back to the Calendar logged in as bnm uller | Your Account  add an event | Log Out Sponsored by The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven and The New Haven Independent Edit this Event T h u  J u l 1 4 , 2 0 1 6  6 :0 0 p m  –  7 :0 0 p m D B E  P u b lic  H e a r in g Sponsored by: Naugatuck Valley Council of Governm ents The Naugatuck Valley Council of Governm ents has updated its Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) Program  and established a DBE goal of 8.1%  for Federal Fiscal Years 2016­2018. The public is encouraged to review and com m ent on the Draft Program  and the proposed Goal. The draft plans are also available from  8:30 am to 4:30 pm , M onday through Friday, at the Naugatuck Valley Council of Governm ents offices located at 49 Leavenworth Street, 3rd Floor, W aterbury, Connecticut 06702, and at the Valley Transit District (VTD) located at 41 M ain Street, Derby, Connecticut 06418. Admission: Free Naugatuck Valley Council of Governm ents 49 Leavenworth Street, 3rd Floor, W aterbury, CT 06702 W aterbury get directions m ore info » Download File: DBE_Program Goal_2016­2018_FINALDRAFT.pdf (417.98KB) 7/28/2016 Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) Program & Goal Update | NVCOGCT http://nvcogct.org/news/disadvantaged­business­enterprise­dbe­program­goal­update 1/2 En español D is a d v a n ta g e d B u s in e s s E n te rp ris e (D B E ) P ro g ra m & G o a l U p d a te June 2 9 , 2 0 1 6 The Naugatuck Valley Council of Governm ents has updated its Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) Program and established a DBE goal of 8.1% for Federal Fiscal Years 2016-2018. The public is encouraged to review and com m ent on the Draft Program (http://nvcogct.org/sites/default/貟ઔles/D BE_P rogram _2016-2018_FIN A LD RA FT.pdf) and the proposed Goal (http://nvcogct.org/sites/default/貟ઔles/D BE_G oal_2016-2018_FIN A LD RA FT.pdf). The draft plans are also available from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm , M onday through Friday, at the Naugatuck Valley Council of Governm ents of貟ઔces located at 49 Leavenw orth Street, 3rd Floor, W aterbury, Connecticut 06702, and at the Valley Transit District (VTD) located at 41 M ain Street, Derby, Connecticut 06418. DBE Program Draft (http://nvcogct.org/sites/default/貟ઔles/D BE_P rogram _2016- TRANSLATE PRINT PDF 7/28/2016 Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) Program & Goal Update | NVCOGCT http://nvcogct.org/news/disadvantaged­business­enterprise­dbe­program­goal­update 2/2 2018_FIN A LD RA FT_0.pdf) • DBE Goal Draft (http://nvcogct.org/sites/default/貟ઔles/D BE_G oal_2016- 2018_FIN A LD RA FT.pdf) Com m ents should be sent to: Benjam in M uller Civil Rights Of琌枦cer Naugatuck Valley Council of Governm ents 49 Leavenw orth Street, 3rd Floor W aterbury Connecticut 06702 Alternatively, you can leave com m ents via phone at (203) 489-0368, or via em ail at bm uller@ nvcogct.org (m ailto:bm uller@ nvcogct.org). A public hearing regarding this update w ill be held at the Naugatuck Valley Council of Governm ents of貟ઔces at the above address on July 14th at 6:00 PM . NVCOG's of貟ઔces are ADA accessible and conveniently located near the W aterbury Green. Interpretive services are available upon request. BACK TRANSLATE PRINT PDF

Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) Program, FFYs 2017-2019

DBE_Program_2016-2018_thumb.png

                     ����= ���� ��� 1 ����= 0.0143 0.0110 = 1.3                            可根据要求提供翻 译。 7/7/2016 Greater New Haven Community Events Calendar | DBE Public Hearing http://events.newhavenindependent.org/index.php/calendar/details/dbe_public_hearing/ 1/1 Back to the Calendar logged in as bnm uller | Your Account  add an event | Log Out Sponsored by The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven and The New Haven Independent Edit this Event T h u  J u l 1 4 , 2 0 1 6  6 :0 0 p m  –  7 :0 0 p m D B E  P u b lic  H e a r in g Sponsored by: Naugatuck Valley Council of Governm ents The Naugatuck Valley Council of Governm ents has updated its Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) Program  and established a DBE goal of 8.1%  for Federal Fiscal Years 2016­2018. The public is encouraged to review and com m ent on the Draft Program  and the proposed Goal. The draft plans are also available from  8:30 am to 4:30 pm , M onday through Friday, at the Naugatuck Valley Council of Governm ents offices located at 49 Leavenworth Street, 3rd Floor, W aterbury, Connecticut 06702, and at the Valley Transit District (VTD) located at 41 M ain Street, Derby, Connecticut 06418. Admission: Free Naugatuck Valley Council of Governm ents 49 Leavenworth Street, 3rd Floor, W aterbury, CT 06702 W aterbury get directions m ore info » Download File: DBE_Program Goal_2016­2018_FINALDRAFT.pdf (417.98KB) 7/28/2016 Disadv antaged Bus ines s Enterpris e  (DBE)  Program  &  Goal  Update  | NVCOGCT http://nv cogc t.org/news /dis adv antaged-bus ines s-enterpris e-dbe-program-goal-update 1/2 En español Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) Program & Goal Update June 29, 2016 The Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments has updated its Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) Program and established a DBE goal of 8.1% for Federal Fiscal Years 2016-2018. The public is encouraged to review and comment on the Draft Program (http://nvcogct.org/sites/default/貟ઔles/DBE_Program_2016-2018_FINALDRAFT.pdf)  and the proposed Goal (http://nvcogct.org/sites/default/貟ઔles/DBE_Goal_2016-2018_FINALDRAFT.pdf) . The draft plans are also available from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm, Monday through Friday, at the Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments of貟ઔces located at 49 Leavenworth Street, 3rd Floor, Waterbury, Connecticut 06702, and at the Valley Transit District (VTD) located at 41 Main Street, Derby, Connecticut 06418. DBE Program Draft (http://nvcogct.org/sites/default/貟ઔles/DBE_Program_2016- TRANSLATE PRINT PDF 7/28/2016 Disadv antaged Bus ines s Enterpris e  (DBE)  Program  &  Goal  Update  | NVCOGCT http://nv cogc t.org/news /dis adv antaged-bus ines s-enterpris e-dbe-program-goal-update 2/2 2018_FINALDRAFT_0.pdf)  • DBE Goal Draft (http://nvcogct.org/sites/default/貟ઔles/DBE_Goal_2016- 2018_FINALDRAFT.pdf) Comments should be sent to: Benjamin Muller Civil Rights Of琌枦cer Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments 49 Leavenworth Street, 3rd Floor Waterbury Connecticut 06702 Alternatively, you can leave comments via phone at (203) 489-0368, or via email at bmuller@nvcogct.org (mailto:bmuller@nvcogct.org) . A public hearing regarding this update will be held at the Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments of貟ઔces at the above address on July 14th at 6:00 PM. NVCOG's of貟ઔces are ADA accessible and conveniently located near the Waterbury Green. Interpretive services are available upon request. BACK TRANSLATE PRINT PDF

NVCOG Bylaws

Bylaws of the N augatuck Valley Council of Governments Adopted February 20, 2015 Amendments December 11, 2015 – Article X June 17 , 2016 – Articles I, V, VI, VII, VIII and XII i This P age is intentionally left blank Bylaws of the Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments Adopted February 20, 2015 Contents Article I: Organization ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1 Section 1: Name………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 1 Section 2: Definitions …………………………………………………………………………………………… 1 Article II: Purpose and Powers ………………………………………………………………………………….. 2 Section 1: Purpose ………………………………………………………………………………………………. 2 Section 2: Powers and Responsibilities ……………………………………………………………………. 2 Article III: Functions ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 3 Section 1: Coordinating Functions ………………………………………………………………………….. 3 Section 2: Regional Plans ……………………………………………………………………………………… 3 Article IV: Membership, Representatives and Alternates ………………………………………………. 4 Section 1: Membership ………………………………………………………………………………………… 4 Section 2: Representatives and Alternates ………………………………………………………………. 6 Section 3: Proxies ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 6 Article V: Meetings of the Council ……………………………………………………………………………… 6 Section 1: Notice of Meetings ……………………………………………………………………………….. 6 Section 2: Regular Meetings ………………………………………………………………………………….. 7 Section 3: Special Meetings …………………………………………………………………………………… 7 Section 4 : Budget Meeting ……………………………………………………………………………………. 7 Section 5 : Quorum ………………………………………………………………………………………………. 7 Section 6 : Action …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 7 Section 7 : Record of Meeting ………………………………………………………………………………… 7 Section 8 : Cance llation of Meeting …………………………………………………………………………. 7 Section 9 : Remote Participation in Meetings ……………………………………………………………. 7 Bylaws of the Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments Adopted February 20, 2015 Section 10: Rules ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 8 Section 11: Meetings without Notice ………………………………………………………………………. 8 Article VI: Officers and Executive Committee ………………………………………………………………. 9 Section 1: Title and Terms …………………………………………………………………………………….. 9 Section 2: Election of Officers and At-Large Representatives ………………………………………. 9 Section 3: Vacancies ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 9 Section 4: Chairperson …………………………………………………………………………………………. 9 Section 5: Vice-Chairperson ………………………………………………………………………………… 10 Section 6: Secretary …………………………………………………………………………………………… 10 Section 7: Treasurer …………………………………………………………………………………………… 10 Article VII: Committees and Liaison ………………………………………………………………………….. 11 Section 1: Committee Formation ………………………………………………………………………….. 11 Section 2: Executive Committee …………………………………………………………………………… 11 Section 3: Standing Committees …………………………………………………………………………… 12 Section 4: Special Committees …………………………………………………………………………….. 12 Section 5: Liaison to Other Organizations ………………………………………………………………. 13 Article VIII: Executive Director ………………………………………………………………………………… 13 Section 1: Duties and Responsibilities …………………………………………………………………… 13 Section 2: Appointment ……………………………………………………………………………………… 14 Section 3: Removal ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 15 Article IX: Legal Counsel …………………………………………………………………………………………. 15 Article X: Regional Planning Commission ………………………………………………………………….. 15 Section 1: Duties and Responsibilities …………………………………………………………………… 15 Section 2: Organization ………………………………………………………………………………………. 15 Bylaws of the Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments Adopted February 20, 2015 Section 3: Functions. ………………………………………………………………………………………….. 16 Article XI: Metropolitan Planning Organization (reserved)……………………………………………. 16 Article XII: Fiscal Management ………………………………………………………………………………… 16 Section 1: Fiscal Year………………………………………………………………………………………….. 16 Section 2: Budget Adoption…………………………………………………………………………………. 16 Section 3: Funds, Gifts, Bequests, or Contributions ………………………………………………….. 17 Section 4: Grants ………………………………………………………………………………………………. 17 Section 5: Audit ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 17 Section 6: Expenditure of Funds …………………………………………………………………………… 17 Section 7: Membership Dues……………………………………………………………………………….. 17 Section 8: Petty Cash Fund ………………………………………………………………………………….. 17 Section 9: Reports ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 18 Article XIII: Amendments ……………………………………………………………………………………….. 18 Article XIV: Technical Corrections……………………………………………… …………………………………………18 Article X V: Withdrawal ………………………………………………………………………………………….. 18 Article XVI: Effective Date ………………………………………………………………………………………. 18 Bylaws of the Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments Adopted February 20, 2015 1 Article I: Organization Section 1: Name The name of the organization is the Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments, also referred to as “ Council" or “ NVCOG.” Section 2: Definitions As used herein and throughout th ese Bylaws, these words, phrases and abbreviations shall have the followi ng meanings: (A) “Alternate”: Pursuant to CGS 4-124n, a secondary representative of a Member, appointed by the Representative of that Mem ber, who may attend and vote at any meeting in place of their absent Representative. (B) “Chief Elected Official”: The highest ranking officer of a municipality in an office elected by electors. (C) “Council”: Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments. (D) “Commission”: Regional Planning Commission of the Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments. (E) “Land Use Officer”: an indiv idual who provides services relating to zoning (as defined by the Connecticut General Statues (CGS) Chapter 124), planning (as defined by C GS Chapter 126) or inland wetlands and watercourses (as defined by CGS Chapter 440) for an NVCOG Member. (F) “Member”: A municipality that has joined the Council through the ratification of an ordinance. (G) “NVCOG” – Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments. (H) “Representative”: Pursuant to CGS 4-124k, a Chief Elected Official directly and separately elected, who acts on the official behalf of a member. Or, if a Chief Elected Official is statutorily absent (i.e. ceremonial head of government not directly and separately elected), an individual appointed by a municipal legislative body. (I) “Simple Majority”: a vote count of h alf plus one. (J) “ Technical corrections”: grammatical, numerical, or other changes which are intended to address drafting errors, internal conflicts, or other points of concern and do not substantially alter the composition, responsibilities, or organ ization of any entity or entities established within these bylaws. (K) “Term”: a period of Two Calendar Years of service in the relevant office following municipal elections held in odd- numbered years. Bylaws of the Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments Adopted February 20, 2015 2 Article II: Purpose and Powers Section 1: Purpose The purpose of the Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments is to: (A) Serve as a continuing forum to promote cooperative arrangements between its members ; (B) Initiate and implement programs, and coordinate actions, on a voluntary basis, determined to be of benefit to the Naugatuck Valley Region ; (C) Serve as a regular forum for contact and discussion of items of mutual interest among municipal officials ; (D) Consider such matters of a public nature common to two or more members of the Council, as it deems appropriate, including matters affecting the health, safety, welfare, physical development, conservation, transportation, and economic conditions of the region ; (E) Coordinate and carry out comprehensive regional planning in the Naugatuck Valley Planning Region. Section 2: Powers and Responsibilities The Council shall have all the rights and authority and shall be subject to all of the responsibilities and duties as are granted to and required of a regional council of governments under the General Statutes of the State of Connecticut ( “CGS ”), Chapter 50, Sec. 4 -124c through 4 -124 u, as may be amended fro m time to time , or by special acts of the Connecticut General Assembly, including the rights, responsibilities, and duties pertaining to regional planning organizations , Chapter 127 , Sec. 8 -3 5 a through 8— 35c and Sec 8 -3 5e , as may be amended f ro m time to time. Bylaws of the Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments Adopted February 20, 2015 3 Article III: Functions Section 1: Coordinating Functions The Council shall promote regional coordination and cooperation through activities designed to: (A) Strengthen local governments and their individual capacities to deal w ith local problems. (B) Serve as a forum to identify , study , and resolve area- wide problems. (C) Provide the organizational framework to insure effective communication and coordination among governmental bodies. (D) Serve as a vehicle for the collect ion and exchange of information for the membership. (E) Encourage action and implementation of regional plans and policies by local, state and federal agencies. (F) Provide, if requested, mediation in resolving conflicts among members and between membe rs and other parties. (G) Provide technical and general assistance to members within its staff and financial capabilities. Section 2: Regional Plan s The Council shall adopt a R egional Plan of Conservation and D evelopment and recommend policy for the development of the region. The Council shall instruct the Commission to prepare and keep up -to -date a R egional Plan of Conservation and D evelopment and to prepare reports, plans and policies as required by the Connecticut General Statutes, as may be amended from time t o time and other applicable laws , and may instruct the Commission to prepare other plans and documents as the Council shall deem appropriate. Any s uch instructions of the Council shall specify a reasonable time period in which the Commission shall take th e action required by such instructions. Any modifications of the Plan shall be subject to approval by the Council. Bylaws of the Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments Adopted February 20, 2015 4 Article IV: Membership, Representatives and Alternates Section 1: Membership (A) Eligibility . Membership in the Council shall be the member municipalities of the Region, as defined or redefined by the Secretary of the Office of Policy and Management, or his/her designee, under provisions of CGS Sec. 16a 1 At the time of adoption it was CGS Sec. 4 -124j Bylaws of the Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments Adopted February 20, 2015 5 (D) Withdrawal . Any Member city, town, or borough may withdraw from membership in the Council by adoption of an ordinance of its legislative body as set forth in CG S Sec. 4 – 124j. (1) Notice of Withdrawal. The withdrawing member shall give notice to the Council of its withdrawal not less than thirty (30) days prior to the end of the Council’s fiscal year. Notice of withdrawal shall be given by certified mail along with a copy of the relevant ordinance to the attention of the Chairperson of the council as soon as reasonably possible following the adoption of such ordinance, and shall be deemed given wh en received by the Chairperson. (2) Post Withdrawal Statutory Obligations. As required by law the withdrawing member shall be “ obligated to pay its pro rata share of expenses of operation and pro rata share of funds committed by the C ouncil to active programs as of such date of withdrawal .” 2 (E) Suspension. Suspended members shall not be entitled to participate in the affairs of the Council. The Council may withhold any services it deems appropriate from Members in delinquency. If the Council performs statutorily required services for or within the municipal bounds of a Member in delinquency, the Council may levy pro -rated, line -item charges to such M ember related solely to the provision of such services. Payment of all delinquent assessments, in full, will automatically reinstate such municipality to full rights, privileges, and services. The Council may restore privileges to M embers in delinquency provided that such members agree to and carry -out a payment plan with the Council. 2 See, CGC Sec. 4 -124j. Bylaws of the Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments Adopted February 20, 2015 6 Section 2: Representatives and Altern ates (A) Representative . Refer to the definition of “Representative” in Article 1 Section 2G for information. In the absence of a directly and separately elected Chief Elected Official , the legislative body of the Member shall appoint an elected official to serve as a R epresentative of the M ember. By January of every even-numbered year, such M embers lacking a Chief Elected Official shall appoint an elected official of the municipality as their Representative. (B) Alternates . The Representative may send an alte rnate (hereafter, “Alternate ”) in his or her stead . Such Alternate shall have the same rights and privileges of the official Representative, except as may be otherwise established within these Bylaws . The A lternate: (1) must be an employee or official of the appointing Member; (2) shall serve co -terminus with the Representative; (3) may function as a member of any executive committee , subcommittee , or working group, provided that the Member is not otherwise represented on such entity; (4) shall report to the Member’s Representative on all matters and, where provided, follow the direction of such Representative. In instances where the Representative and Alternate are present, the Representative exclusively retains the ability to vote, take action, and participate in Counci l affairs. Section 3: Proxies If the Representative and the Alternate are unavailable for a meeting , then the Representative may appoint a meeting -specific representative by the submission of a proxy letter addressed to the Council chairperson and in a format presc ribed by the Council. The Representative’s signature on the proxy letter demonstrates a reading and understanding of the actions and agenda of the Council. Receipt of a properly executed proxy letter grants the proxy all the same rights and privileges of t he Representative with the exceptions that: proxies may not hold any Council office ; be designated chair or member of special or standing committees ; and when an NVCOG officer is represented by proxy, their office shall be considered vacant for the purpose s of the meeting. Article V: Meetings of the Council Section 1: Notice of Meetings Public notice of meetings shall be made in writing between seven (7) days and twenty -four (24) hours before the meeting date. The notices shall include the place and time of the meeting, a state ment of the purpose for the meeting, and a proposed agenda for the meeting. Bylaws of the Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments Adopted February 20, 2015 7 Notices of special meetings shall be provided between seven (7) days and twenty -four (24) hours prior to the date of the meeting. Section 2: Regular Meetings Unless otherwise specified by r esolution of the Council, the regular meetings of the Council shall be held at least eight (8) months a year. The time and place of regular meetings shall be in accordance with a schedule adopted annually, in December, by resolution of the Council and tran smitted to the Secretary of State, as required by law. Section 3: Special Meetings Special meetings shall be held by call of the Chairperson or by petition to the Secretary of the Council from those individuals making up thirty (30%) percent of the membership of the Council, or upon petition of a majority vote of the Executive Committee of the Council. Section 4: Budget Meeting Unless otherwise specified by resolution of the Council, the budget meeting of the Council shall be held in May . Section 5: Quorum For the conduct of business of the Council, a simple majority of the membership of the Council shall constitute a quorum. Section 6: Action Action by the Council, except where otherwise provided, sha ll require an affirmative vote of at least a simple majority of members of the Council present and vo ting and constituting a quorum. Only items included in the agenda shall be acted upon at such meeting other than routine ministerial or administrative matters, except by the approval of two -thirds (2/3) of all R epresentatives present and constituting a quorum. Section 7: Record of Meeting Meeting actions and minutes by the Council with the vote result s shall be published within twenty -four (24) and seventy -two (72) hours, respectively, of the meeting in NVCOG files and the NVCOG website, and distributed to the town halls for public inspection . Representatives may, after the filing of the minutes, submit written comments on items in the meeting agenda or minutes to be added as addenda to the minutes. Section 8: Cancellation of Meeting The Chairperson may cancel a meeting provided that written notice of the cancellation is given to the M embers. In case of weather or an emergency, the E xecutive Director or a designee shall be authorized to cancel the meeting if the C hairperson cannot be reached. Section 9: Remote Participation in Meetings Representatives who are unable to attend Council meetings in person may participate i n all m eetin gs by a ny m eans of c ommu nic a tio n (including, but not limited to, e le ctro n ic, te le p h on e, video, in te rn et/o nline ) by which all M em bers part ic ip ating may s im ult a n eo usly he ar eac h oth er and /or part ic ip ate d uring the meeting . A Member participating remotely in a meeting shall be Bylaws of the Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments Adopted February 20, 2015 8 deemed present at the meeting for all purposes, including, but not limited to votes and quorum. Meetings with such participation sha ll be held in a designated public place and conducted with the same procedures as specified elsewhere in these bylaws. A roll call vote will be conducted for tallying votes. Section 10: Rules All meetings of the Council and of all committees and subcommittees shall be conducte d in accordance with the most recently published edition of Robert’s Rules of Order. Section 11: Meetings without Notice The Council may meet without notice or a quorum provided that no action is taken during such meeting. Bylaws of the Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments Adopted February 20, 2015 9 Article VI: Officers and Executive Committee Section 1: Title and Terms (A) Officers. Officers of the Council shall include a Chairperson, Vice -Chairperson, Secretary, and Treasurer, who shall also be Assistant Secretary. (B) Executive Committee . The Executive Committee of the Council shall consist of the Chairperson , Vice Chairperson, Secretary, and Treasurer of the Council, as well as five at -large Representatives of the Council. At -large Representatives shall be nominated by a majority vote of the Council. At -large R epresentatives and O fficers which comprise the Executiv e Committee shall serve until the end of their two year term or until their successors have been elected, in adherence with the processes for the election of officers defined elsewhere within these Bylaws. Section 2: Election of Officers and At -Large Representatives A nominating committee of three (3) Representatives shall be appointed by the Council to recommend a slate of officers and the at- large Representative members of the Executive Committee. The O fficers and at-large R epresentatives shall be elected at the first (1 st) meeting of the calendar year, following municipal elections held in the odd -numbered years, by a simple majority vote of the M embers present at the meeting and constituting a quorum . Representatives shall serve until the last meeting of the succ eeding odd-numbered calendar year in which municipal elections are held, or until successors have been elected. In a year in which the election of Officers and at -large Representatives takes place, t he Nominating Committee shall provide notice to the M embers of the Council , at least seven (7) days prior to the meeting to elect Officers and at -large Representatives , of its proposed slate of O fficers and at -large Representatives . During a meeting in which the Nominating Committee reports its nomine es to the Board, the Board shall entertain nominations from the floor. Section 3: Vacancies In the event any v acancy occurs in any office or o n the Executive Committee during the year, a successor shall be elected to serve the unexpired term. A successor shall be proposed by the Chairperson and elected by the Council by a simple majority vote of M embers present at the meeting. The Chairperson shall also consider nominations from the floor. Such service shall not constitute one (1) term for the purposes of term limitations . Section 4: Chairperson The Chairperson shall preside at all meetings of the Council and the Executive Committee ; however, in the absence of the Chairperson the Vice Chairperson shall preside. In the absence of the Chairperson and Vice Chairperson, a member of the Execut ive Committee designated by Bylaws of the Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments Adopted February 20, 2015 10 the Council as acting Chairperson shall preside or assume the responsibilities of said officer for the duration of absence . When so directed by the Council, the Chairperson or the Executive Director may sign contracts and other documents in the name of the Council. The Chairperson may call special meetings of the Council as set forth in these Bylaws. As a M ember of the Council, the Chairperson shall have the right to vote on all matters which may come before the Council. The Chairperson shall be a M ember of all standing and special committees, ex officio without vote, except in the case of tie votes or when required for a quorum. Section 5: Vice-Chairperson The Vice Chairperson shall have other such powers and perform such duties as may be assigned by the Council. In the event the Chairperson for any reason vacates the chair or is absent or unable to exercise the duties of office , the Vice Chairperson shall assume the powers and duties of the Chairperson. Section 6: Secretary The Secretary shall k eep the official records of the Council, including the minutes of meetings of NVCOG and the Executive Committee , and generally shall perform such duties as may be required of them by the Council. The Secretary shall see that all meeting notices are duly gi ven in accordance with the provisions of the Bylaws or as required by law. In the absence or inability of the Secretary to serve, the Treasurer shall assume the powers and duties of the Secretary. Section 7: Treasurer The Treasurer shall receive and take charge of all money, property, and securities of the Council delivered to them. Under the direction of the Treasurer, the Executive Director or their designee shall deposit all money to the credit of the Council in a bank or banks selected by the Executive Committee. Under the directions of the Treasurer, the Executive Director or their designee shall make all disbursements, and an accurate record of receipts and disbursements will be kept. A report on finances will be given to the Council at each regular meeting of t he Council. The Treasurer shall submit NVCOG books and records for the annual audit under the provisions of the Municipal Auditing Act and federal audit requirements. The Treasurer shall furnish bond in the amount established by the Council and the cost of this bond to be paid by the Council. In the event of the inability of the Treasurer to serve, the Committee is authorized to appoint an acting Treasurer who shall be covered by bond. Bylaws of the Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments Adopted February 20, 2015 11 Article VII: Committees and Liaison Section 1: Committee Formation The Council may establish c ommittees whenever deemed necessary to further the purpose of the Council. Section 2: Executive Committee (A) Meetings. Regular Meetings of the E xecutive Committee shall take place between ten ( 10) and two ( 2) business days prior to regular meetings of the Council. The Executive Committee shall meet at the call of the Council Chairperson. The Chairperson may, or any three (3 ) members of the Executive Committee may, require the Chairperson to call a special meeting of the Executive Committee. Notice of special mee tings shall be provided to members seven (7) days, and no less than twenty-four ( 24) hours, in advance of meeting. A quorum shall be a simple majority of the members of the Executive Committee. (B) Responsibilities . The Executive Committee shall have the following responsibilities and functions: (1) Recommend ation to the Council of: a. Such personnel policies, administrative regulations, and procurement and financial procedures as may be required by the applicable and per tinent federal or state laws, regulations o r requirements, these Bylaws , and the annual program and budget adopted by the Council. b. Any and all contracts of the Council, including any contracts with the Federal, State, or other public, non -profit and private organizations. Moreover, proposed agre ements, except those with an agency of the State or federal government, may be reviewed as to legal form by an attorney designated by the Council. c. Candidates for the position of Executive Director, including compensation following recruitment of said candidates . In the event the position of Executive Director is vacant, the Executive Committee may, with the concurrence of the Council, appoint an Acting Executive Director (2) Overseeing the execution of the policy decisions made by the Council. (3) Preliminary consideration of the budget, as prepared by the Executive Director, and recommend for approval a budget to the Council during May of each year. In order to recommend the annual budget to the Council, the affirmative vote of a simple majority of the fu ll membership of the Executive Committee is required. Bylaws of the Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments Adopted February 20, 2015 12 Budget proposals shall reflect: a. Annual Council goals advanced by the Executive Committee and approved by the Council at the time of annual budget approval; and b. Annual personnel evaluations conducted by the Executive Director, including self -evaluation, under the direction of the Executive Committee. (4) During the course of the fiscal year, the Executive Committee shall review proposals for budget changes, amendments, and transfers of funds between accounts that may be made from time to time and shall have the authority to approve such changes, amendments, or transfers provided such changes, amendments, or transfers do not increase the assessments of the members of the Council and do not exceed ten perc ent (10%) of the approved budgeted item. (5) Such other duties as are assigned to it by the Council as required for the management of the business affairs of the Council and consistent with federal or state law, regulation or requirements and these Bylaws . Section 3: Standing Committees Standing Committees shall be formed and operate as follows: (A) Members of all Standing Committees shall be appointed by the Chairperson of the Council to serve until the last meeting of the succeeding odd- numbered calendar year in which m unicipal elections are held, or until their successors have been appointed. (B) A quorum for Standing Committee action shall be five (5) members or fifty (50%) percent of the committee membership, whichever is less. Each Standing Committee may elect or appo int one Vice-Chair person . (C) Each Standing Committee may act for the Council carryin g out programs approved by the Council within its general area of responsibility. No Standing Committee shall commit the Council to contracts, financing, or other commitmen ts not previously approved by the Council. (D) Standing Committees will keep written records of meetings for submittal to the executive director and shall make regular progress reports to the Council. Section 4: Special Committees The Council may establish, from time -to -time, such special or ad hoc committees as may be needed. Such committees shall serve such terms and perf orm such duties as the Council Bylaws of the Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments Adopted February 20, 2015 13 prescribes. Special Committees will keep written records of meeting for submittal to the executive director. Section 5: Liaison to Other Organizations The Council may, as it deems necessary or desirable, designate from among its Representatives, Alternates or staff individuals to serve as a liaison to other organizations. The purpose of such liaison shall be to enhance communicati on and coordination between the Council and other organizations whose functions are related to the interests of the Council. Article VIII: Executive Director Section 1: Duties and Responsibilities The Executive Director shall be the chief administrative officer of the Council. The Executive Director shall be responsible to the Council for the administration of the Council’s affairs placed in his or her charge by or under these Bylaws and for implementing policy directives of the Council. The Executive Director shall have the follow ing powers and duties: (A) Preparation of proposed programs together with a proposed annual budget for submission to and consideration by the Executive Committee and adoption by the Council. Up on adoption by the Council, the Executive Director shall be responsible for executing and administering the work program and budget; (B) Advis e the Council and Executive Committee Council regarding the progress of the NVCOG work program and recommendin g appropriate and necessary measures concerning the affairs and operatio n of NVCOG; (C) Preparation of the agenda for and attendance at all Council and Executive Committee mee tings as a non -voting member, with the right to participate in discussion; (D) Countersignature, with the Treasurer or other designated officers , of all checks issued by the Council. Further, the Executive Director shall prepare and administer a system of internal control over all cash disbursements that is consistent with appropriate Federal and State guidelines ; (E) Responsibility for the supervision of the NVCO G staff and the coordination of the work of consultants . In this regard the Executive Director shall: (1) Recommend annually a pay plan and personnel policies for all personnel employed by the Council. (2) Establish the number, duties and compensation of NVCO G employees, in accordance with the budget approved by the Council; (3) Appoint and remov e, when necessary, NVCOG employees; create and discontinue staff positions , except that of the Executive Director, in accordance Bylaws of the Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments Adopted February 20, 2015 14 with the budget approved by the Council. Simultaneous, advisory notice will be given to the Executive Committee regarding the Executive Director’s termination of any NVCOG employee. Such notice shall include the name of current employee and reason for termination. Should discussion of these mat ters be protected by law or otherwise not wholly within the control of NVCOG, the Executive Director shall schedule a mee ting of the Executive Committee, in executive session, if necessary. (4) Change, consolidat e, or abolish any NVCOG departments or division s of the staff in accordance with the Council b udget and subject to the approval of the Executive Committee; (F) Report to the Council on all matters affecting the organization, as directed by the Council; (G) Ensur e that all provisions of laws affect ing the Co uncil are enforced and executed as intended. (H) Submit to the Council and mak ing available to the general public an annual report on the ac tivities of the NVCOG ; (I) Approv e non -recurring expenditures for individual items provided that the expenditure is: (1) Within the budget and terms approved by the Council; (2) Consistent with these Bylaws and applicable federal and state guidelines ; and, (3) Submitted to the Council at the next meeting with a record of their non- recurring expenditures for the period since the subm ission of the last such record ; However, t he Executive Director shall request Council approval for non -recurring expenditures in excess of five thousand ($5,000.00) dollars and not identified in the approved budget; and. (J) Perform other such duties as direc ted by the Council and may be subject to other requirements under the terms of their engagement or other engagements pertaining to them. Section 2: Appointment The Executive Committee shall have the authority to recruit and recommend the Executive Director, and the s alary, subject to the approval of the Council. The Executive Director shall be appointed for an indefinite term. The salary shall be fixed at the time of the appointment of the Executive Director and shall thereafter be reviewed annually at the time of the adoption of the budget. Bylaws of the Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments Adopted February 20, 2015 15 Section 3: Removal The Council may remove the Executive Director from office, for cause as shall be defined in a written employment agreement, by an affirmative vote of a simple majority of the entire membership of the Council. Article IX: Legal Counsel A legal counsel may be employed as needed, in a manner prescribed by the Council, to advise and represent NVCOG. Article X: Regional Planning Commission Section 1: Duties and Responsibilities The planning duties and responsibilities of the Council shall be carried o ut by the Regional Planning Commission. The planning duties and responsibilities of the Commission shall include, but need not be limited to, (1) oversight of plans and studies; (2) addressing referrals concerning land use regulations or other matters, (3) the development of recommendations concerning a regional Plan of Conservation and Development (POCD) as addressed in CGS Sec. 8 -35a; (4) the development of recommendations concerning a federally mandated Long Range Transportation Plan. The Commission shall take on other duties at the direction of the Council. Section 2: Organization (A) The Commission shall operate according to procedures devised by the Commission which are (1) in compliance with these Bylaws and all applicable state and federal law, and (2) approved of by action of the Council. These operating procedures shall comply with the following: a. The Commission shall have an Executive Committee, the constitution and powers of which shall be identified within the operating procedures developed by the Commission. b. Th e Commission’s Members shall be the Members of the Council . c. Each Member’s representative to the Commission shall be an elector or land use officer nominated by the planning and zoning board of the Member and confirmed by the chief elected official, as def ined within these bylaws, of the Member. Each Member may also appoint an alternate, who shall be an elector or land use officer of the member, by an identical process. (B) The Council empowers the Commission to work in concert with NVCOG staff in the fulfillme nt of its duties and responsibilities. Bylaws of the Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments Adopted February 20, 2015 16 Section 3: Functions (A) The Commission shall prepare and keep up-to -date a regional POCD and prepare planning studies, reports, and policies as required by federal law and by the Connecticut General Statutes, as amended . The Council may instruct the Commission to prepare other plans and documents. Any such instruction of the Council shall specify a reasonable time period in which the Commission shall take action required by such instructions. (B) The Commission shall consider, comment u pon, issue findings, and advise the Council on all planning matters referred to the Council which are required by law to be referred to and considered by a Council of Governments. The Commission may consider, comment upon, and issue findings on statutory land-use referrals pursuant to Connecticut General Statutes 8 -3b and 8 -26b. (C) Reports, plans, and policies of the Commission other than Commission findings in response to referrals under Section 3( B) of this article shall be presented to the Council as propos als at the next regular meeting of the Council. The Council may act upon such submission by adopting, rejecting, modifying, or referring the same back to the Commission for further consideration at the earliest practicable point in time. Article XI: Metropolitan Plan ning Organization (reserved) Article XII: Fiscal Management Section 1: Fiscal Year The fiscal year of the Regional Council, for the purposes of work program development, budgeting, accounting, auditing, and fiscal reporting shall commence July 1and come to a close at 11:59 :59 PM EST June 30 . Section 2: Budget Adoption A preliminary budget shall be prepared on or before April 30 by the Executive Director and distributed to the Executive Committee for submission to the Council. The preliminary budget advanced to the Council shall be based upon: (1) a detailed chart of expenditure accounts considered by the Executive Committee; (2) personnel evaluations conducted by the Executive Director under the guidance of the Executive Committee; (3) a staffing -salary plan approved by the Executive Committe e; and (4) proposed goals for the ensuing fiscal year, which shall accompany the proposed budget. The Council will review the preliminary budget in May. A final budget shall be approved by June preceding the beginning of the fiscal year . In the event a b udget is not adopted for the ensuing fiscal year, the budget for the preceding fiscal year shall be considered to be the approved budget until a new budget is adopted. Bylaws of the Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments Adopted February 20, 2015 17 Section 3: Funds, Gifts, Bequests, or Contributions Funds, gifts, bequests, and contributions may b e received by the Council for its own use and purposes from any source including local, state, and federal governments, individuals, corporations, or associations, provided that they are to be used at the discretion of the Council. Section 4: Grants The Council may approve requests for grants from the state or federal government. Approval of such requests shall include authorization by the Council to the Executive Director to sign such agreements or contracts with the state or federal government, within the scope of t he requests of the Council to the state or to the United States government. Section 5: Audit The Executive Committee , which shall serve as the Audit Committee, shall oversee the annual audit of the financial records and statements of the Council and employment of auditors approved by the State Office of Policy and Management in connection therewith. The Executive Committee shall make recommendation to the Council concerning engagement of an auditor. The annual audit shall be made ava ilable for review no later than the second Wednesday in December following the end of the fiscal year. A t its first meeting following receipt of the audi t, t he Executive Committee will then mak e recommendation to the Counc il pertaining to the Council’s formal acceptance of the audit following the Executive Committee’s receipt and review of such audit. Section 6: Expenditure of Funds Expenditures of Council funds shall be within the budget approved by the Council, and shall adhere to the Financial Policy and Procedures Manual approved by the Council . Section 7: Membership Dues In January of each year, preliminary assessments for all participating members shall be established by the Council , upon recommendation of the Executive Committee , to assist in the municipal budgeting process for the ensuing fiscal year. F inal assessments shall be established in concert with the annual budget and shall not exceed those fixed as preliminary assessments. Section 8: Petty Cash Fund To facilitate prompt payment of small amounts, there may be a petty cash fund of a maximum of one hundred ( $100.00) dollars. An advance of this principal sum is authorized to be placed in the custody of the Executive Director or a staff member designated by them, which fund, when it nears depletion, shall be replenished through the regular disbursement procedu re. Bylaws of the Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments Adopted February 20, 2015 18 Section 9: Reports (A) Financial Report. At each regular meeting of the Council and when otherwise requested by action of the Council, the Treasurer shall report to the Council on the Council’s financial condition. Article XIII: Amendments These Bylaws may be amended by a vote of two -thirds (2/3) of the Members of the Council, These Bylaws shall first be submitted to any regular or special meeting of the Council for preliminary consideration and only then, if preliminarily approved, placed on the agenda for the next succeeding r egular or special meeting of the Council for formal adoption. Notice of any amendment shall be sent to all Representatives of the Council. Special notice of amendments to these Bylaws shall be provided to members seven (7) days before the date of an amendment’s preliminary consideration. Prior to formal adoption, the Council shall engage with an attorney who shall determine the legality and validity of the proposed amendment(s). These Bylaws shall become effective immediately upon their adoption by a majority of the representatives of two -thirds (2/3) of the municipalities which have adopted the ordinance establishing this Council, at the date of the meeting these Bylaws or amendments are acted upon. Article XIV: Technical Corrections Technical corrections may be mad e to these bylaws at any time provided that a summary of such corrections is submitted to the Council at the next regular meeting following the implementation of such corrections. Article XV: Withdrawal Any Member of the Council may withdraw from membership in the Cou ncil by the adoption of an ordinance of withdrawal by its legislative body. If, at the time of withdrawal, a municipality has not paid its relevant assessment of dues, its withdrawal does not remove it from its obligation to pay such dues. Article XVI: Effective Date For the purpose of the original adoption of these Bylaws, such adoption shall be made by an action of two -thirds (2/3) of the eligible membership.

Title VI Program Plan

Prepared in conjunction with: TITLE VI PLAN Endorsed by NVCOG Board of Directors March 11, 2016 Effective April 1, 2016 Revised May 3, 2016 Factor 1: Number/Proportion of LEP Persons Served …………………………………..6 Factor 2: Frequency of LEP Contact With Services …………………………………….. 13 Factor 3: Assessing Nature & Importance of Program …………………………….. 13 Factor 4: Assessing the Resources Available ………………………………………………….. 13 Language Assistance Plan …………………………………………………………………………………………. 14 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 INTRODUCTION FOUR-FACTOR ANALYSIS PUBLIC PARTICIPATION PLAN Public Participation Description ……………………………………………………………………………….. 17 Summary of Recent Outreach …………………………………………………………………………………. 18 Makeup of Boards ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 18 ERRATA Subrecipient Monitoring ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 19 Facility Construction ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 19 5 17 19 19 APPENDICES Our Title VI Notice …………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 2 Authority………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….3 Open FTA Grants ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………3 INTRODUCTION 1 This Title VI Program Plan (the Plan) has been prepared to assist the Naugatuck Valley Council of Gov- ernments (NVCOG), the MPO for the region, and the Valley Transit District (VTD) in ensuring compliance with Section 601 of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which states: Under the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and as a recipient of federal funding under the programs of the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) of the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT), NVCOG and the Transit District have an obligation to ensure that: • The benefits of its transit services are shared equitably throughout its service area; • The level and quality of its services are sufficient to provide equal access to all riders in its service area; • No one is precluded from participating in its service planning process; • Decisions regarding service changes or facility locations are made without regard to race, color or national origin; and • A mechanism is in place for the remediation of any discrimination which may occur, even if such discrimination is unintentional Within its available resources, and with full regard for the delivery of efficient and effective transit ser- vice, NVCOG and the Valley Transit District will continue compliance with the regulations of the FTA and the spirit of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. This plan supersedes the Valley Council of Governments’ Title VI Plan of 2013 and is effective as of April 1, 2016, as required. It has been prepared using data from the 2010 Decennial Census and 2014 American Community Survey. Additionally, the Plan recognizes the relationship of NVCOG and the Val- ley Transit District, with regard to Title VI planning, complaints, and procedures, to be synonymous as one entity where the NVCOG provides certain planning and programming for the Valley Transit District who provides transit service and operations. “No person in the United States shall, on the ground of race, color, or national origin, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimi- nation under any program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance.” INTRODUCTION 2 Furthermore, this plan applies to all instances of NVCOG’s use of FTA funding for planning and programming in other urbanized areas within its jurisdiction, outside of Valley Transit District’s service ar- ea. Our Title VI Notice To make the Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments and Valley Transit District’s service recipients aware of its commitment to Title VI Compliance—and of their right to file a Title VI Complaint—NVCOG and the Transit District have promulgated the following language on the homepage of their websites (www.valleytransit.org & www.nvcogct.org), on posters at both facilities, and on all Valley Transit District buses. Your Civil Rights The Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments (NVCOG) and the Valley Transit District (VTD) are committed to providing non-discriminatory service to ensure that no person is excluded from participation in, or denied the benefits of, or subjected to discrimination in the receipt of its services on the basis of race, color or national origin as protected by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 ("Title VI"). To request more information about Title VI, or to submit a written complaint if you believe that you have been subjected to discrimination, you may contact: Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments Office of Civil Rights & Title VI Compliance 49 Leavenworth Street, 3 rd Floor Waterbury, CT 06702 In addition to your right to file a complaint with the NVCOG or VTD, you have the right to file a Title VI complaint with: U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Transit Administration Office of Civil Rights Kendall Square 55 Broadway Cambridge, MA 02142 INTRODUCTION 3 Authority As a provider of paratransit services within the Lower Valley portion of the Naugatuck Valley planning region, NVCOG and VTD strive to fulfill the requirements and the spirit of relevant regulation. This plan was prepared under the following regulatory framework: Open FTA Grants The Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments has four open grants with the FTA: In addition, NVCOG and VTD receive annual operating assistance from the Connecticut Department of Transportation. Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 42 U.S.C. § 2000d DOT Implementing Regulations 49 C.F.R. § 21 DOJ Implementing Regulations 28 C.F.R. § 42.401 et seq. 28 C.F.R. § 50 CT-90-X426-01 $4,920,000 Facility Assessment & Reconstruction CT-90-X466-00 $4,150,000 Facilities Expansion & Assessment CT-39-0002-0 $375,000 Route 8 Alternatives Study CT-95-2014-0 $450,000 FOUR-FACTOR ANALYSIS 5 Under guidance from the U.S. Department of Transportation, the Council of Governments and Transit District are obligated to deter- mine the extent of its obligation to provide LEP services to its transit population. This determination must be based on an analysis of four factors: An analysis of these four factors are on the following pages, as well as information about how NVCOG and VTD address these factors individually and holistically. LEP Limited English Proficiency FOUR-FACTOR ANALYSIS 6 Factor 1 Number & Proportion of LEP Persons Likely to Be Serviced Interviews with VTD staff indicate that Spanish-speaking LEP persons will call on occasion to schedule a ride, around once per week. VTD staff cannot recall a recent time when an LEP person speaking a lan- guage other than Spanish called for services, and suggested that it happens once every year. The Valley contains 2,177 Spanish-speaking LEP residents according to the 2014 American Com- munity Survey 5-year estimates. The Spanish-speaking population as a whole has grown 25% since 2011, while the LEP population has grown at 12%. Because Spanish is a common language in many countries, it is helpful to determine which regions Spanish speakers are moving from. While precise data on the origin of LEP Spanish speakers is unavailable, ACS Table B03001 does provide origins for Hispanic or Latino populations in the region. Because not all Hispanic or Latino persons speak Spanish, nor do all primarily Spanish-speaking persons identify as Hispanic or Lati- no, this provides an incomplete picture. The largest Hispanic or Latino population is Puerto Rican, followed by Mexican and Ecuadorian (Table 2). There is also an LEP Polish-speaking population in the region that numbers 1,027. Besides Spanish and Polish, smaller populations of Portuguese-, Italian-, Chinese-, and other Indo- Table 1: ACS 2014, B16001 Population Percent Total 84,704 100.00% English Only 68,186 80.50% Spanish 6,850 8.09% LEP 2,177 2.57% Polish 2,346 2.77% LEP 1,027 1.21% Portuguese / Creole 1,138 1.34% LEP 452 0.53% Italian 1,034 1.22% LEP 361 0.43% Chinese 677 0.80% LEP 246 0.29% Other Indo-European 603 0.71% LEP 246 0.29% Serbo-Croatian 305 0.36% LEP 166 0.20% Vietnamese 235 0.28% LEP 162 0.19% Other Slavic Languages 335 0.40% LEP 140 0.17% Laotian 197 0.23% LEP 100 0.12% All Other Languages 2,798 3.30% LEP 605 0.71% Table 2: ACS 2014, B03001 Population Percent Hispanic or Latino 11,285 100.00% Puerto Rican 5,572 49.38% Mexican 1,706 15.12% Ecuadorian 1,184 10.49% Guatemalan 436 3.86% Peruvian 402 3.56% Colombian 397 3.52% Spaniard 351 3.11% Argentinean 300 2.66% Cuban 240 2.13% Dominican 221 1.96% All other Hispanic or Latino 476 4.22% FOUR-FACTOR ANALYSIS 7 European-speakers exist in the Valley region. NVCOG will continue to monitor these linguistic populations to see if significant changes occur. In addition to the tables provided, NVCOG & VTD have analyzed the locations of Spanish– and Polish-speaking populations in the district to better understand the distribution of these populations, and to assist with identifying likely partner organizations. See the following pages for that analysis. Because VTD transit services are limited to paratransit, the likelihood of being serviced depends on the likelihood of utilizing paratransit services. To attempt to gather proximal information about likeli- hood of paratransit utilization, we’ve looked at census data on the LEP population over the age of 65. (Table 3). Because paratransit services are not exclusively used by the elderly, and because data is una- vailable by individual language outside of Spanish, this table is not indicative of the exact number or proportion of the population which might rely upon VTD’s transit services. NVCOG also analyzed other organizations’ reports regarding the population of the transit district. Data- Haven, in partnership with our partner the Valley Community Foundation, published the 2015 report The Valley Now that included demographic infor- mation. This report is the beginning of a larger process which will be com- pleted this year. While there was no reporting on specific languages in the region, the analysis did show that the immigrant population and the Hispanic and Latino population is growing rap- idly and has a large population of young adults and children. Local senior centers concur that the Spanish-speaking population in the region is growing rapidly, particularly among the elderly. Senior centers were worried about their capability to serve the growing Spanish-speaking elderly population without funding to hire additional staff. Conversations with our partner organizations support the data indicating that many Spanish speakers in the region are from Puerto Rico. The organizations spoken with indicated that LEP persons usually lived with a younger family member who spoke English fluently, usually children or grandchildren. Polish-oriented churches spoken with indicated that there are a number of Polish-speaking LEP persons in their congregations. Churches felt that this population was very small, and do not maintain Polish speakers on staff aside from the church fathers who happen to speak the language. Table 3: ACS 2014 B16004 Population Percent Population Age 65 and Over 14,075 100.00% Speak only English 12,076 85.80% Speak Spanish 615 4.37% Speak English less than "very well" 421 2.99% Speak other Indo-European languages 1,203 8.55% Speak English less than "very well" 529 3.76% Speak Asian & Pacific Island languages 125 0.89% Speak English less than "very well" 106 0.75% Speak other languages 56 0.40% Speak English less than "very well" 0 0.00% FOUR-FACTOR ANALYSIS 8 range: 0-54% μ: 12.4% s: 9.1% US Census Bureau ACS 2014 5-year Estimates NVCOG & VTD assume no liability or responsibility for the unintended use of this data. FOUR-FACTOR ANALYSIS 9 Spanish-Speaking Population By Town Polish-Speaking Population By Town LEP Spanish-Speaking Population By Town LEP Polish-Speaking Population By Town FOUR-FACTOR ANALYSIS 10 range: 0-33% μ: 6.9% s: 6.2% US Census Bureau ACS 2014 5-year Estimates NVCOG & VTD assume no liability or responsibility for the unintended use of this data. FOUR-FACTOR ANALYSIS 11 range: 0-35% μ: 9.1% s: 7.5% US Census Bureau ACS 2014 5-year Estimates NVCOG & VTD assume no liability or responsibility for the unintended use of this data. FOUR-FACTOR ANALYSIS 12 range: 0-11% μ: 2.1% s: 2.2% US Census Bureau ACS 2014 5-year Estimates NVCOG & VTD assume no liability or responsibility for the unintended use of this data. FOUR-FACTOR ANALYSIS 13 Factor 2 Frequency of contact Valley Transit District, the operator of NVCOG-owned transit vehicles in the district, provides paratransit services, including complementary ADA service, for one bus route in the service area. Because of the limited nature of transit services provided by VTD & NVCOG, no community organizations were aware of populations of LEP persons reliant on VTD services. Through our own analysis of the Census data, provided in previous maps, NVCOG was able to identify that the regions with high LEP populations also tended to have lower rates of automobile ownership and higher rates of commuting via public transit, which would indicate that broadly LEP persons could be more likely than the general population to also require the paratransit services VTD provides. Factor 3 Nature / Importance of Program The paratransit services provided by VTD are of great importance to the population dependent upon them, though that population is small. VTD provides ADA transit services to populations unable to access existing fixed route service in the District provided by other transit providers. Riders are steered to VTD transit services through a centralized ADA program at the state level. VTD also provides frequent non-emergency medical transportation for its riders. While few LEP individuals regularly use VTD’s services today, VTD’s services are absolutely vital to those who are de- pendent upon them. In conversations with local senior centers, the importance of the non-emergency medical transportation provided was especially highlighted as the primary benefit of our services. Factor 4 Resources Analysis Current language assistance measures currently being used include providing machine translation of the VTD & the NVCOG websites into Spanish and Polish, maintaining a full-time dispatcher/phone operator fluent in Spanish, providing Spanish-language translations of relevant forms, and Spanish-language rider guides provided by the State of Connecticut, which is responsible for approving ADA status and coordi- nating riders to the appropriate paratransit provider. VTD phone operators also have the ability to con- tact The Birmingham Group to obtain interpretive services for languages other than Spanish at VTD’s ex- pense. This service has not been required at any point in the recent past, according to conversations with VTD staff. The costs of the above currently-provided services are minimal, as the Spanish-language transla- tions are already developed, and the Spanish-fluent staff member is integral to the operations of VTD. Based on the other factors in the four factor analysis, it is recommended that VTD work to pro- vide additional translations of documents into Polish to facilitate meaningful access. Because one-time translation costs are low, providing Polish-language versions of vital documents should be a priority over the next year. FOUR-FACTOR ANALYSIS 14 Language Assistance Plan In order to provide meaningful access to LEP persons, it is first important to note which documents pro- vided by NVCOG & VTD are vital to using the transit services provided. After a review of the steps re- quired to use VTD’s services, the following documents are considered vital: • Valley Transit District Website • Title VI Notice of Rights • Complaint Forms • ADA Application All of the above documents must be available in any language meeting the Safe Harbor threshold. From the four factor analysis, it is clear that the Spanish speaking population meets the Safe Harbor threshold for the re- gion. It is unclear whether the Polish speaking population meets this thresh- old, however from the resource analysis in Factor 4 it is clear that provid- ing vital documents translated into Polish is relatively low cost. At present, all of the above are available in some format in Spanish and in Polish. (The ADA Application is maintained by the State of Connecticut in a centralized location and is machine translated.) In addition to ensuring the Safe Harbor threshold is met, it is clear that providing Spanish- language assistance is important to best serve our target population now and in the future. NVCOG and VTD make extensive efforts to transmit information to the public in Spanish in addition to English, includ- ing making the following additional materials available in Spanish to the service area: • Public Participation Outreach • Interior Bus Notifications • Ride Guide (maintained by State of CT) The Council of Governments and Transit District also retains one customer service representative who is fluent in Spanish and is available on all business days. Occasionally a Spanish-speaking LEP individual calls to schedule a ride when our representative is unavailable, or there is the potential for an LEP individual who speaks a language other than Spanish to call. In these cases VTD customer service representatives are able to take down their phone number and make contact with one of our partners to provide interpretive services. Once interpretive assistance is secured, the rider is contacted and the ride is scheduled. This does not delay the ride, even if the time between the call and the translation eclipses VTD’s standard deadline for ride scheduling. Additionally, a Polish-speaking population lives in the region. Through the four factor analysis, NVCOG and VTD have concluded that this population does not require the same level of language as- sistance that the Spanish-speaking population requires. NVCOG & VTD have ensured that all vital docu- ments are available in Polish. Conversations with VTD staff and culturally-Polish institutions indicate that our relationship with The Birmingham Group will suffice for interpretation as the needs arise. Culturally- Polish institutions, particularly Catholic churches in the district, have also offered to provide interpretive services and assistance in reaching this community. These institutions have been added to internal lists of organizations to contact to disseminate public notices, as several have newsletters. Safe Harbor? If the eligible LEP popula- tion in a given language exceeds 5% or 1000 mem- bers of the eligible popula- tion for VTD’s services, vital written materials will be translated to accommo- date their needs. FOUR-FACTOR ANALYSIS 15 Partner Organizations for LEP Assistance Ansonia Housing Authority Area Congregations Together Birmingham Group Health Services Coordinated Transportation Solutions Derby Housing Authority Naugatuck Valley Health District Seymour Housing Authority Shelton Housing Authority St. Joseph Church St. Michael the Archangel Parish TEAM, Inc. The WorkPlace, Inc. Valley Arts Council Valley United Way PUBLIC PARTICIPATION PLAN 17 The Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments and the Valley Transit District are required to submit a Title VI program every three years per FTA Circular 4702.1B. The Council of Governments and Transit District understand the importance of involving the public, especially members of underserved popula- tions, in the development and planning of its Title VI program. The Council of Governments and the Transit District will utilize the following procedures to engage the public in its Title VI program. This public participation plan applies to all outreach activities of the Valley Transit District. • Title VI program updates will be published in at least two (2) publications having substantial circu- lation in the transit service area at least one week apart. Notices will also be posted on the NVCOG and the VTD websites, along with the four municipal town halls that are located within the Transit District’s service area. • The Council of Governments and the Transit District will seek help from community leaders and organizations to facilitate involvement of traditionally underserved populations. Community leaders and organizations that represent these groups should be consulted about how to most effectively reach their member for public involvement in the Title VI program. • Public meetings should be held in locations that are accessible by public transit. If a targeted population is located in a certain geographic area, then the meeting location should be in that area for their convenience. • There will be a minimum of a thirty (30) day public comment period beginning with the first public notice. • A public session item will be placed on the NVCOG board agenda for two consecutive months following the first published notice. That the posting include the date, time and location, as well as identifying the location as ADA accessible, for the public meeting. • Any resulting change or action due to public comment or discussion will be documented in the NVCOG board meeting minutes and posted within seven (7) business days at the four (4) cities/ town (halls/offices) comprising the VTD’s service area. • The Title VI program will take effect immediately following the decision of the NVCOG board meeting at which a vote on the Title VI program will be taken. PUBLIC PARTICIPATION 18 • All public meetings related to the Title VI program will be held at an ADA accessible facility. Summary of outreach since 2013 There has been no major public outreach done by Valley Transit District or NVCOG related to the transit district since 2013. This is due to the fact that there have been no changes in the services provided and no major complaints about services that would suggest more outreach is necessary. Additionally, NVCOG has been undergoing a merger of organizations between 2014 and 2016 that has precluded more in- depth discussions of potential service improvements. Makeup of Boards The primary mechanism for decision-making for VTD is the Board of Commissioners. This is the overall governing and policy-setting body and consists of 10 members representing the four municipalities which comprise the service area. The Board meets monthly at regularly scheduled public meetings which are publicly noticed. Members are appointed to one-year terms by the Chief Elected Officials of the munici- palities of Ansonia, Derby, Seymour, and Shelton. The number appointed for each municipality is set by a formulate based on the populations of the represented municipalities, as set forth in Chapter 103A of the Connecticut General Statutes, and is presently as follows: Of the total membership, 8 are Caucasian (5 males and 3 females) of which 1 is a disabled female. Appointed from Ansonia 1 (1 vacant) Appointed from Derby 2 Appointed from Seymour 2 Appointed from Shelton 3 ERRATA 19 In addition to the above procedures and processes, full Title VI compliance requires the following explicit information: Subrecipienct Monitoring The Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments is a direct recipient of FTA funds and has no subrecipi- ents. Facility Construction Title 49 CFR Section 21.9(b)(3) states, “In determining the site or location of facilities, a recipient or appli- cant may not make selections with the purpose or effect of excluding persons from, denying them the benefits of, or subjecting them to discrimination under any program to which this regulation applies, on the grounds of race, color, or national origin; or with the purpose or effect of defeating or substantially impairing the accomplishment of the objectives of the Act or this part.” Title 49 CFR part 21, Appendix C, Section (3)(iv) provides, “The location of projects requiring land acquisi- tion and the displacement of persons from their residences and businesses may not be determined on the basis of race, color, or national origin.” NVCOG and VTD acknowledge their responsibility to complete a Title VI equity analysis during the planning stage with regard to where a project is located or sited to ensure the location is selected without regard to race, color, or national origin. This process will include outreach to persons potentially impacted by the siting of facilities. The Title VI equity analysis would compare the equity impacts of vari- ous siting alternatives, and occur before the selection of the preferred site. When evaluating locations of facilities, NVCOG will give attention to other facilities with similar impacts in the area to determine if any cumulative adverse impacts might result. Analysis will be done to ensure that proper perspective is given to localized impacts. If NVCOG determines that the location of the project will result in a disparate im- pact on the basis of race, color, or national origin, it may only locate the project in that location if there is a substantial legitimate justification for locating the project there, and where there are no alternative locations that would have a less disparate impact on the basis of race, color, or national origin. ERRATA 20 VTD Maintenance & Operations Facility The Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments is overseeing the construction and renovation of the Val- ley Transit District maintenance and operations facility through funding from FTA grant CT-90X-426-01. A needs and deficiency study was conducted and a preferred alternative was selected by the Valley Transit District board of directors. The preferred alternative involves an entire overhaul of HVAC, plumb- ing, electrical, and mechanical systems, as well as an addition to the maintenance bay, bus storage bay, and dispatch center. The existing building will remain and will be added onto. No additional land will be built upon; the renovations will be completely within the existing property footprint with no additional property required. This project qualified for a Categorical Exclusion. This Categorical Exclusion is based on the renovation of an existing facility that will not expand beyond the existing site, and will not require the acquisition of additional land. More specifically, the ren- ovations include the replacement and upgrade of the facilities mechanical systems which are located within the building. Additionally, there will two additions to the building which also do not extend beyond the existing site. A full environmental report was prepared. APPENDICES 21 The following documents are appended: • Title VI Discrimination Complaint Form • Title VI Discrimination Complaint Process • NVCOG Board Endorsement 1  Valley Transit District/Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments Discrimination Compla int Form Complainant’s Name: S treet Address: City/Sta te/ Zip: P hone: Email (if Available) Di scrimination because of: ____ Race ____ Color ____ National Origin ____ Gender ____ Age ____ Disability ____ Other Please provide the date(s) and location(s) of the alleged discrimination, the name(s) of the individual(s) who allegedly discriminated against you, including their titles (if known). Please pr ovide the names, addresses and telephone numbers of any witnesses. Explain as briefly and as clearly as pos sible; what happened, how you felt that you were discriminated against and who was involved. If applicable, please include how other persons were treated differently from you in the same circumstances. S ignature: Date: You may use additional sheets of paper if necessary. Also, please include any written materials pertaining to your complaint. Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments /V alley Transit District (NVCOG/VTD) Ti tle VI Compliance Procedures I. NVCOG/VTD ’s Title VI Complaint Process a) All NVCOG/VTD Title VI complaints will be filed in accordance with the following procedures: 1. Any person a lleging to be aggrieved by a discriminatory practice may, in person or through legal representation, obtain a Title VI Complaint Reporting Form from the NVCOG/VTD ’s website or the Civil Rights & Title VI Compliance Offi cer. Any Title VI complaint must be filed within180 days follo wing the date of the alleged discriminato- ry action, or the date the Compla inant became aware of the alleged discriminatory action. 2. Alternatively, if the complaint is filed via letter, the Civil Rights & Title VI Compl i- ance Officer may complete the complaint report form and attach the complaint le tter. Complaints received orally or by telephone will be converted to writing and pr ovided to the Complainant for confirmation, revision and signature before processing. Signed allegation of discrimination received by facsimile or email will be acknow l- edged and processed. 3. Complaints must be in writing, signed by the Complainant, or their legal represent a- tive, and include the Complainant’s name, address and telephone number. Co m- plaints shall explain, as fully as poss ible, the facts and circumstances surrounding the alleged discriminatory action and identify the indivi dual(s) responsible for the alleged discriminatory action. 4. The Civil Rights & Title VI C ompliance Officer will review the complaint to ensure that it is the appropriate Title VI jurisdi ction. If the complaint does not fall within the parameters of Title VI, then the Civil Rights & Title VI Compliance Officer will red i- rect the complaint throu gh the Transit District ’s Formal Complaint and Appeal Pr o- cedure. 5. If the complaint conforms to Title VI standards, the Civil Rights & Title VI Compl i- ance Officer will ensure that the required information is provided, and that the co m- plaint is timely and wit hin the appropriate jurisdiction. The complaint will be accep t- ed unless: it is withdrawn, is not filed timely, or the complainant fails to provide the required information after a written follow -up request for any missing information. The complaint inves tigation will be completed within 40 days of the day of r eceipt. 6. Once a Title VI complaint has been confirmed, the Civil Rights & Title VI Compl i- ance Officer will submit a letter to ConnDOT and FTA Region 1 as notification that a Title VI complaint is unde r inve stigation. 7. The Civil Rights & Title VI Compliance Officer will conduct a Title VI investigation utilizing a Council of Governments/Transit District Title VI Complaint Inve stigation Report. Upon completion of the investigation, the Civil Right s & Title VI Compli- ance Officer will present the results and any corrective recommendations of the inves- tigation to the Transit District ’s Chief Executive Officer for approval. 8. Upon the final approval of the Chief Executive Officer, the Civil Rights & Titl e VI Compliance Officer will implement any corrective actions that have been identified, log the investigation on the Title VI Complaint Log, and maintain all of the complaint and investigation forms for the Connecticut Department of Transportation Annual Report Survey. 9. Within 10 days of the Chief Executive Officer’s approval, the Civil Rights & Title VI Compliance Officer will respond in writing to the Complainant with the findings of the investigation. b) Complaints Filed directly with ConnDOT: 1. Written compl aints filed with the ConnDOT, in which NVCOG/VTD is named as the Re- spondent, will be analyzed and invest igated by ConnDOT. When the Transit District is informed of the investigation by ConnDOT, it will conduct its own internal Title VI in- vestigation. The Civil Rights & Title VI Compliance Officer will forward a copy of the complaint, and a copy of the Title VI Complaint Investigation Report (within 60 days of the complaint date r eceived from ConnDOT) to the FTA Re gion 1 Civil Rights Coordina- tor. 2. A complaint log will be maintained for all complaints filed with and investigated by ConnDOT. ConnDOT notifies the Respondent that they have been named in a co m- plaint. The notification letter will indicate the Investigato r’s name and inform the R e- spondent that they will be contacted for an interview. The complaint investigation will be completed within 40 days of the day of receipt. c) Complaints Filed Directly with FTA: 1. Written complaints filed with the FTA, in which NVCOG/VTD is named as the Re- spondent, will be analyzed and investigated by FTA. When the Transit District is in- formed of the investigation by FTA, it will conduct its own internal Title VI investiga- tion. The Civil Rights & Title VI Compl iance Officer will forward a copy of the com- plaint, and a copy of the Title VI Co mplaint Investigation Report (within 60 days of the complaint date received from FTA) to ConnDOT’s Civil Rights Coordinator. 2. A complaint log will be maintained for all complaints filed with and investigated by FTA. FTA notifies the Respondent that they have been named in a complaint. The notification letter will indicate the Investigator’s name and inform the Respondent that they will be contacted for an interv iew. The complaint investigation will be co m- pleted within 40 days of the day of receipt. V. NVCOG/VTD ’s Title VI investigation process a) Investigation – An investigation is an official inquiry for the purpose of dete rmining whether there has been a violation of the laws or statutes and includes a determination of appropriate relief where a violation has been found. An investigation requires an obje c- tive gathering and analysis of the evidence, which will e nsure that t he final decision is as accurate as possible. b) Role of the Investigator – The investigator is a neutral party provided by the Transit A u- thority to conduct an investigation of the issues raised in a complaint. The Investigator’s behavior, demeanor, and atti tude reflect the Transit District and may affect the degree of cooperation received from the parties. The investigator has an obligation to identify and obtain relevant evidence from all available sources in order to resolve all of the issues under invest igation . The investigator is not an advocate for the Complainant or the Re spondent. The Investigator is a neutral fact finder. c) Responsibilities of the Investigator – The investigator must:  Never express his/her opinion  Never tell the parties that the com plaint represents a good case or that the complaint is frivolous  Always remain neutral.  Write the facts, and state what the facts are, based upon the evidence of testimony  Decide who is to be interviewed. If the Complainant or the respondent is adamant abo ut a witness i nterview, perform the interview  Decide when sufficient evidence has been gathered to begin writing the investigative report  Always remain professional and polite  Be a good listener d) The investigative process includes the following:  Investigati ve Report  Request for information  Conducting interviews  On -site visit  Obtain evidence  Analyze data  Writing the Investigative Report e) Investigative Report – The Investigative Report is a working document intended to define the issues and provide a roadmap to complete the investigation. It is also an internal do c- ument for use by the Investigator and his/her supervisor to keep the Investigation on track and focused on the relevant issues. It is the Investigator’s checklist, and the following e l- ements should b e contained in an I nvestigative Report:  Complainant(s) name and address  Attorney for Complainant with name and address  Respondent(s) name and address  Attorney for Respondent with name and address  Applicable Law (e.g. Title VI)  Basis  Issue(s)  Background  Nam e of person(s) to be interviewed, including questions for the Complainant, R e- spondent, and Wi tness(es)  Evidence to be obtained during the investigation f) Conducting Interviews – When preparing for the interview, the main objective is to o b- tain information fr om witnesses who can provide information that will either support or refute the allegations. A list of major questions will be prepared that address the issues involved in the complaint. 1.) Complainant – The purpose of interview is to gain a better understan ding of the situ a- tion outlined in the complaint of discrimination. The Investigator will contact the Complainant to ensure that Invest igator understands the Complainant’s allegation(s). It is recommended that the Investigator interview the Complainant pr ior to preparing the investigation report. If it is not possible, the Investigator will make any changes as appropriate to the Investigation Report Form, based upon any new information provided by the Complainant. The Investigator will always inquire of the Complai n- ant whether he/she desires to resolve the co mplaint. 2.) Respondent – Respondents are interviewed to provide an opportunity to respond to the allegations raised by the Complainant. Add itionally, it provides the Investigator with an opportunity to understand the Respondent’s operation or policies that the Complainant cites. As the keeper of the records, the Investigator will discuss the i n- vestigation with the Respondent, and be able to explain the need for requesting any documentation on the Invest igators list. The Investigator will inform the Respondent that he/she has the right to submit a formal position statement addressing the Co m- plainant’s allegations. The Investigator will question the Respondent regarding po s- sible settlement or remediation opportun ities. 3.) Witness – The Complainant or Respondent may request that additional persons be i n- terviewed. The Investigator will determine what relevant information, if any, a wi t- ness has to provide prior to conduc ting an interview with them. The Invest igator will only interview persons who have information rel evant to the allegations raised in the complaint of discrimination. g) On -Site Visit – An on -site visit will be conducted when:  Personal contact with the Complainant and the Respondent may yield infor mation and clarification that might not otherwise be di scovered by only reviewing the written document or telephone contacts.  It is necessary to review the physical environment.  More effective communication can be established with representative and witnes ses of the Compla inant and Respondent.  Documentation can only be examined on -site for reasons of convenience, cost, fo r- mat, or volume. h) Obtaining Evidence – Evidentiary requests shall be related to the issues cited in the co m- plaint. An evide ntiary request may contain some or all of the following:  The policies and procedures regarding the practice that the Complainant has alleged  All documents relating to Respondent’s dealing with Complainant in the situation d e- scribed in the complaint  Documents which exhibi t how others not in the Complainant’s group were treated under similar ci rcumstances  Respondent’s reason for the action taken  A formal position statement f rom Respondent addressing Complainant’s allegations There are various classifications of evidence, w hich include the following:  Circumstantial Evidence – Includes facts from which may be inferred intent or di s- criminatory motive and proves intent by using o bjectively observable data.  Comparative Evidence – A comparison between similarly situated individua ls.  Direct Evidence – Related to the Respondent’s motive, it is defined as any statement or action by an official of the Respondent that indicates a bias against members of a particular party.  Documentary Evidence – Written material, which is generated dur ing the course of normal business activity.  Statistical Evidence – Statistics, facts, or data of a numerical type, which are asse m- bled, classified, and tabulated so as to present significant information about a given subject.  Testimonial Evidence – Evidenc e that is provided orally. i) Analyzing Data – Data will be analyzed to determine whether a violation has occurred. When analyzing d ata, the Investigator will:  Review what happened to the Complainant.  Compare Complainant’s treatment with the appropriate polic ies and procedures  Compare Complainant’s treatment with others in the same situation  Review Respondent’s reason(s) for the treatment afforded the Complainant  Compare Respondent’s treatment of the Complainant with the treatment afforded ot h- ers j) Writing the Investigative Report – The Investigative Report (IR) will contain the follo w- ing sections:  Complainant(s) name and address  Respondent(s) name and address  Applicable Law  Basis  Issues  Findings for each issue with a corresponding conclusion for each issue  Reco mmendations

NVCOG Personnel Policies

NAUGATUCK VALLEY COU NCIL OF GOVERNMENTS Personnel Policies Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments Adopted 1/16/2015 NVCOG Personnel Policy and Employee Manual 5/19/2015 Page 1 of 20 Contents Categories of Employment ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. …………………. 3 Full -Time ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. …………. 3 Part -Time ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. …………. 3 Temporary ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ……….. 3 Exempt and Non -Exempt Employees ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. .. 3 Working Hours ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. …….. 3 Overtime ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. …………….. 4 Compensatory Time ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. 4 Performance and Salary Review ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. …………. 4 Introductory Period ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. . 4 Termination of Employment ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………. 4 Employee Benefits ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. .. 5 Personal Day s ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. …… 5 Vacation with Pay ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. …………………………. 5 Sick Leave with Pay ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ……………………….. 5 Parental Leave ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ….. 6 Family and/or Medical Leave of Absence ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ……………………… 7 Special Leaves of Absence ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………. 8 Expenses ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………….. 8 Insurance Coverage ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ……………………….. 9 Retirement Program ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ……………………. 10 Profession al Dues ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………… 10 Personnel Policies ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. . 11 Standards of Conduct ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. …………………… 11 Conflict of Interest ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………. 11 Outside Employment/Public Service ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. . 11 Use of COG Property: Phones, Computers, E -Mail, Internet, etc. ………………………….. ………………………….. ……………….. 12 Dress Code ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. …….. 13 Personnel Records ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………. 13 Substance Abuse policies ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ……………… 13 On -the -Job Accidents ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. …………………… 14 NVCOG Personnel Policy and Employee Manual 5/19/2015 Page 2 of 20 Inclement Weather ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ……………………… 14 Disciplinary Action ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………. 14 Dismissal / Termination ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ……………….. 14 Grievance Procedure ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ……………………. 15 Other Policies ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. …….. 15 Equal Opportunity Statement ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ……….. 15 Affirmative Action Policy Statement ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. . 17 Equal Opportunity Complaint Procedure ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ……………………. 19 Sexual Harassment Policy ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. …………….. 19 Drug -Free Workplace Policy Statement ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………. 20 CODE OF ETHICS ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. 20 NVCOG Personnel Policy and Employee Manual 5/19/2015 Page 3 of 20 Categories of Employment Full -Time Employees regularly scheduled to work a full 35 -hour work week throughout a 52 -week period, who are not assigned to a project with a specific termination date. Employees in this category are eligible to receive the complete package of benefits approved by the Counc il. Full -time employees may be classified as exempt or non -exempt. Part -Time A part -time employee is one who is permanently employed for less than 29 hours per week . Except at the discretion of the NVCOG , all part -time employees shall work on an hourly wag e basis. Permanent part -time employees shall be compensated with unemployment and Social Security as required by state law. After six months of continuous employment, all permanent part -time employees shall be compensated with proportionate vacation, sick leave, and holidays. Such employees shall not be compensated with medical benefits except those mandated by State Law. Temporary Employees hired to work for a limited duration of less than nine months, including interns, usually for a specific project at either full -time or part -time hours shall not be entitled to medical benefits or other benefits except those mandated by State Law. Such employees working on a full -time basis for an extended, finite period of time may be eligible for some benefits at the discretion of the Executive Director. Exempt and Non -Exempt Employees NVCOG employee classifications fall into one of two categories: exempt or non -exempt, as defined by the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) . The FLSA requires that certain employees be paid at least minimum wage and overtime for hours worked in excess of 40 hours per week. The FLSA provides tha t some employees are exempt from this requirement. Employees will be informed of the classification of their positions. Exempt : Exempt employees have no limits on the hours that may be worked in a given work or pay period. Exempt employees are expected to work the necessary hours to accomplish their responsibilities without extra pay for overtime worked. Non -Exempt : Non -exempt employees are paid an hourly rate and are eligible for overtime pay at the rate of 1 ½ times their regular hourly rate for hours worked in excess of 40 hours per work week. Working Hours Basic working hours shall be from 8:30 to 4:30, Monday through Friday, with an hour lunch period for a total of seven working hours per day. Employees in positions deemed capable by the Executive Director, may opt to work remotely one day per work week , provided that NVCOG and the employee collectively possess the necessary technological infrastructure to support remote work . An employee may remotely work more than one day per week with the approval of the Executive Director. NVCOG Personnel Policy and Employee Manual 5/19/2015 Page 4 of 20 Overtime Non -exempt employees who work in excess of 40 hours in a given week shall be paid overtime. Overtime is paid at a rate of one and one -half (1 ½) the employee’s regular hourly rate of pay. Overtime shall only be permitted when the needs of NVCOG require it and when approved by the Executive Director. Compensatory Time Compensatory time must be taken within the fiscal year that it is earned. If the compensatory time is earned within two weeks of the end of the fiscal year, that time may be taken during the next quarter with the approval of the Executive Director. All compensatory tim e earned and taken shall be approved by the Executive Director or their designee, provided that the designee is not approving their own compensatory time. Non -exempt staff who work in excess of 7 ho urs per day or in excess of 35 hours per week up to a maxi mum of 40 hours per week shall be compensated by time off equal to the hours worked in excess of 35 up to 40 . Time worked beyond 40 hours per week, on weekends, or on holidays, shall be paid as overtime. Exempt staff shall earn compensatory time for after -hours work and other work on holidays and weekends as approved by the Executive Director. Performance and Salary Review The Executive Director is authorized to employ staff within the monies annually budgeted for each position. The Executive Director shal l conduct annu al salary reviews of NVCOG staff. Based upon the results of these reviews, the Executive Director may make salary recommendations to the Executive Committee, who will in turn make recommendations to the NVCOG for final action. Introductory P eriod All new employees shall have an introductory period of ninety (90) calendar days, during which time NVCOG may observe and evaluate the employee’s performance. This period may be extended up to an additional three (3) months upon approval of the Execu tive Director. An employee in an introductory period may be dismissed at the discretion of the Executive Director without prior notice. After this introductory period, staff members may be dismissed without cause by the NVCOG with no less than two (2) work weeks’ written notice. Termination of Employment Staff members may be dismissed by the NVCOG , with out cause, with no less than two (2) work weeks’ written notice. Staff members may be dismissed with cause with immediate notice. The Executive Directo r may be dismissed by the NVCOG , with out cause, with no less than four (4) work weeks’ written notice or with cause with immediate notice, or as otherwise specified in a contract of employment. All staff members other than the Executive Director wishing to terminate their employment shall give the NVCOG written notice of such termination no less than two (2) work weeks’ written notice. The Executive Director, if wishing to terminate their employment, must provide the NVCOG written notice of such termination no less than four (4) work weeks in advance, or as otherwise specified in an employment contract. The NVCOG prefers earlier notice of such termination from employees whenever possible. NVCOG Personnel Policy and Employee Manual 5/19/2015 Page 5 of 20 Should employment be terminated before the expiration of a full year and vacation hours for that year had already been used, the departing employee shall forfeit out of his final paycheck payment for any vacation hours taken but not yet earned. Upon termination, employees shall not receive reimbursement for earned but unu sed sick time. Employee Benefits Each staff member shall have twelve (12) paid holidays. The list of regular paid holidays shall be: New Year’s Day Martin Luther King Day Presidents’ Day Good Friday (or other religious holiday of the employee’s choice) Memorial Day Independence Day Labor Day Columbus Day Veterans Day Thanksgiving Day Day after Thanksgiving Christmas Day Part -time employees who work more than 1,000 hours during the fiscal year are eligible for paid holiday leave based on a 20/35 ratio of full -time leave. This is equivalent to four hours per holiday. Personal Days Each full -time em ployee may elect three (3) personal days off per year subject to approval of the Executive Director. Vacation with Pay Each full -time employee is entitled to up to seventy (70) hours of paid vacation time per year, until the fifth year of their employment . Beginning with the fifth year of their employment and ending with their ninth , full -time employees are entitled to one -hundred -and -five (105) hours of paid vacation time. Beginning with their tenth year of e mployment and ending with their fourteenth , ful l-time employees are entitled to one -hundred -and -forty (140) hours of paid vacation time. Beginning with their fifteenth year of employment, full -time employees are entitled to one -hundred -and -seventy – five (175) hours of vacation time. Vacation may be accrued and carried over up to 175 hours. Full vacation hours will be credited to the employee as of July 1 of each fiscal year. Should the employee separate from the NVCOG before the expiration of a full year and vacation hours for that year had already been used, the departing employee shall forfeit out of his final paycheck payment for any vacation hours taken but not yet earned. Should employment separate before the expiration of a full year and vacation hours for that year had been ea rned but gone unused, the departing employee shall be compensated for the remaining unused vacation time. Merger Provision: For NVCOG Employees who begin employment at NVCOG prior to J anuary 30 th, 2015 and i f their immediately preceding employer was the Valley C ouncil of Governments (VCOG), the Council of Governments of the Central Naugatuck Valley (COGCNV), or the Central Connecticut Regional Planning Agency (CCRPA), they will be placed upon the vacation NVCOG Personnel Policy and Employee Manual 5/19/2015 Page 6 of 20 accumulation schedule based upon their years of se rvice with COGCNV , VCOG , or CCRPA and shall be allowed to accrue and carry over up to 210 hours. Previous employees of COGCNV may carry over their unused vacation days from their employment at COGCNV to NVCOG. Sick Leave with Pay Sick leave with pay shal l be credited to each full -time employee at the rate of seven (7) hours per month, eighty -four (84) hours per year. Part -time employees who work more than 1,000 hours during the fiscal year are eligible for sick leave with pay based on a 20/35 ratio of ful l-time leave, equivalent to four hours per month. Employees making use of their sick leave or someone else on the behalf of the employee shall contact NVCOG by telephone or e -mail prior to 10:30am on the day of their sick leave use. Employees who do not c ontact NVCOG by telephone or e -mail by this deadline will not receive compensation for the sick time. Up to 35 hours of sick leave may be used because of illness or other personal obligation in the immediate family of the employee upon prior approval of th e Executive Director, unless such illness or personal obligation is of an emergency nature. Twenty -one (21) hours special leave may be used in the event of death in the immediate family. Upon termination, employees shall not receive reimbursement for earn ed but unused sick time. Sick days may accumulate up to a maximum of 240 hours . Part -time employees may accumulate up to 35 hours of sick time. Merger Provision : NVCOG employees who begin employment at NVCOG prior to June 30 th, 2015, if their immediately p receding employer was either the Valley Council of Governments (VCOG) or the Council of Governments of the Central Naugatuck Valley (COGCNV), may convert their unused sick time from COGCNV or VCOG into NVCOG sick time. The decision to perform this action m ust be made prior to June 30 th, 2015. If the employee decides not to convert their sick time, they shall be compensated for their unused sick time at a rate of one hour’s pay for every two hours unused sick time. Parental Leave Parental leave includes maternity leave and paternity leave. (A) A “maternity leave” is defined as the hospital stay and any period of time prior to and subsequent to delivery certified by the attending physician as that period of time when an employee is unable to perform the requi rements of her job. Depending on the circumstances, this certification may be reviewed by an approved state physician selected by NVCOG (B) A “paternity leave” is defined as a period of time prior to and subsequent of delivery or adoption when an employee may be unable to perform the requirements of their job in order to provide care. (C) During the period of maternity or paternity leave, sick leave shall be granted under the terms outlined in this employee manual. NVCOG Personnel Policy and Employee Manual 5/19/2015 Page 7 of 20 (D) Upon expiration of accrued sick leave, the employee may request, and shall be granted, the use of accrued vacation and any other earned time. (E) Upon expiration of paid leave, the employee must request, and shall be granted, a leave of absence without pay, in accordance with the Family and Medical Le ave section below. (F) All requests for maternity or paternity leave under this policy must be submitted in writing to the Executive Director, accompanied by an acceptable medical certificate. This request shall contain the following information: i. The expected date of delivery. ii. The anticipated use of sick leave, vacation, any other earned time, and paternity or maternity leave. iii. Intentions of returning to work. (G) The rules and regulations governing the use and submission of medical certificates shall apply, excep t that the doctor’s original medical certificate will be accepted for absence due to pregnancy and/or childbirth up to six (6) weeks after delivery. (Further absence will require additional medical certificates in accordance with normal procedures.) (H) Wher e not otherwise covered in these policies, eligible employees shall also be entitled to such leave as set forth in State Law and 29 U.S. Code, Section 2611, et seq. NOTE: Nursing of a child, per se , will not be considered a disability for sick leave purpo ses. Family and/or Medical Leave of Absence a. Employees who are regularly scheduled to work more than 1,2 50 hours per year may request a short -term leave of absence for any of the following reasons: i. For the birth of a child and to care for the newborn child; ii. For the adoption of a child, for the placement of the child by foster care; iii. To care for the employee’s spouse, child, or parent with a seriou s illness as hereafter defined; and iv. Because of a serious illness, as hereinafter defined, th at makes the employee unable to perform the functions of the employee’s job. b. Upon such request, the Employee shall provide the Executive Dire ctor with a signed statement of the employee’s intent to return to his or her work position upon the expiration of said leave. c. Upon such request, the Employee shall also provide the Executive Director with medical or legal documentation, upon which the Executive Director shall determine if such leave is justified. The Executive Director may grant an unpaid leave of absence lasting up to four weeks. Unpaid leave of absences longer than four weeks may only be granted by the Council in its sole and absolute discretion. d. The short -term leave shall not exceed a 16 week period within any 12 month period. i. The leave specified shall be unpaid; ii. The NVCOG shall continue at its expense, the medical insurance coverage program the employee had prior to the leave. However, if the emplo yee would have been required to contribute a portion of the premium if the employee had NVCOG Personnel Policy and Employee Manual 5/19/2015 Page 8 of 20 remained an active employee, then and in that event, he or she shall be required to continue that contribution during such leave; and iii. Employees shall not earn or accrue fringe benefits, including but not l imited to sick leave or vacation, during any approved leave. e. Upon the expiration of any approved leave of absence, unless t he employee’s medical condition prevents otherwise. i. The employee may return to the employee’s original job from which the lea ve of absence was provided, or, ii. If the em ployee’s original job is not available, the emplo yee may return to an equivalent position with equivalent pay, if such position is available and budgeted. iii. The employee shall then be entitled to accumulate senior ity, and other fringe benefits, includin g but limited to sick leave or vacation. f. Any employee who fails to return to work as scheduled following the expiration of an approved leave of absence shall be deemed to have voluntarily resigned his or her employment. g. A serious illness as used he rein means an illness, injury, im pairment, or physical or mental condition that involves inpatient care in a hospital, hospice, or resi dential facility; or continuing treatment or continuing supervision by a health care provider. Special Leaves of Absence Jury Duty — Regular full -time employees will be compensated for jury duty for the difference between the jury duty pay and their regular NVCOG salary, not to exceed five work days. Military Leave — Military leave not to exceed two (2) working weeks sha ll be granted regular full -time employees to serve in the Active Reserves or National Guard. An employ ee shall receive the difference between his/her military pay and his/her regular salary if the military p ay is less than his/her regular salary. All militar y leave requests must be accompanied with Authorizati on Orders from the military organization. Regular full -time employees ordered to extended activ e duty in the Armed Forces will retain re -employment rights at the same or a comparable position upon their release from active duty, provided they return to NVCOG within 45 days of their termination from active duty. Expenses Legitimate travel and business expenses will be paid at the discretion of the Executive Director upon submission of an expense voucher. V ouchers shall be submitted at least monthly. Reimbursement vouchers will only be approved when accompanied with receipts. Staff reimbursement vouchers will be paid on regular payroll periods. Staff reimbursement vouchers will not be recognized as a n NVCOG responsibility 60 days or more from their occurrence, and 30 days or more after the end of the fiscal year. Personal Vehicle Mileage — Employees will be reimbursed at the mileage rat e approved by the Connecticut Department of Transportation (ConnDOT), as specifi ed by the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA)., for use of their own vehicle on Council business. NVCOG Personnel Policy and Employee Manual 5/19/2015 Page 9 of 20 Evening Meals — Employees will be reimbursed $ 20 .00 for meals (a recei pt is not needed). Meals can be charged to NVCOG up to the maximum limit. If you reside within the area comprising the NVCOG’s (“Region”) Region and are required to attend an evening meeting in the Region, you may choose to be reimbursed for either $20 .00 for a meal or mileage from your home and return for that meeting at the ConnD OT approved rate. If you reside outside the Region, you may request $ 20 .00 reimbursement for a meal only. Other Travel Expenses — Receipts for tolls (at least a one -way samp le), parking, bus, etc. must be attached to travel vouchers. Conference Expenses — Staff attendance at professional conferences or meetings involving expenses of not more than $2,500.00 may be authorized by the Executive Directo r within budgeting limitations. Requests involving expenses in excess of $2,500 .00 may be auth orized by the NVCOG . While in attendance at conferences, subsistence expenses up to a maximum of $ 35.00/day will be reimbursed by the NVCOG . The maximum can be raised to $40.00 with the approval of the Executive Director. Meals a t conference s, authorized by the Executive Director or the NVCOG will be r eimbursed for actual cost (even in excess of $15.00) excluding all alcoholic beverages. Prior Approval for Reimbursement — If prior approval from a funding source is required for travel reimbur sement, it must be obtained before the expense is incurred. Tuition – Provided proper provision can be made in the NVCOG budget, employees may request in writing to the Executive Director for assistance (time or money) from NVCOG for college courses relat ed to the profession. If the Executive Director approves of monetary assistance, employees shall submit a tuition receipt and a passing final grade in all courses for which they requested assistance before payment shall occur. NVCOG may assume up to one -ha lf of the cost of tuition for work -related courses or programs taken at an accredited institution. Employees shall not be reimbursed if they are not employed by the NVCOG at the time they present their receipt and final grade. If an employee is not employe d at the NVCOG for at least one year after he is reimbursed for tuition, that reimbursement shall be withheld from his last paycheck on a sliding scale based on the number of months he was with the NVCOG . Insurance Coverage All full -time NVCOG employees, their spouses and legal dependents will receive a comprehensive medical, hospitalization, prescription, life insurance, disability insurance, dental and vision health benefits plan, subject to any deductibles or co -pays as may be required b y the NVCOG Group Plan. All NVCOG employees age 65 and older and eligible for Medicare shall be provided with a Medicare Supplement Plan offered through the group plan in place of the medical, hospitalization, prescription and life insurance coverage lis ted in paragraph 1. NVCOG Group Plan coverage for employees on Medicare is extended to the employee only. NVCOG currently participates in the CT Partnership Plan through the State of Connecticut Office of the Comptroller. If employees use providers in th e Plan Network, all expenses are covered in full after any co -pays and deductibles, if required, are met. NVCOG Personnel Policy and Employee Manual 5/19/2015 Page 10 of 20 Full -time employees who have medical coverage outside of the NVCOG Group Plan may elect to opt -out of coverage through NVCOG. Full -time employees wh o opt -out of the NVCOG Group Plan shall receive the equivalent of 1/3 the cost of what the premium would otherwise have been for that employee, spouse and legal dependents. NVCOG reserves the right, at its sole discretion, to alter the benefits provided, including the specific type of benefit, the provider and benefit amounts. Merger Provision: The above insurance policy is intended as an interim (December 1, 2014 through January 31, 2015) policy. By February 1 st of 2015, a new insurance policy may be n egotiated and the benefits, including the specific type of benefit, the provider, and benefit amounts, may change , at NVCOG’s sole discretion. Retirement Program Full -time employees are able to participate in one of two retirement benefit plans: Simplified Employer Pension (SEP) or defined contribution. Employees hired by NVCOG after December 31st, 201 5 shall automatically be enrolled into NVCOG’s defined contribution plan. Simplified Employer Pension : NVCOG shall contribute to this plan 6% of an enrolled employee’s gross annual earnings unless otherwise specified by agreement with the Board. Defined Contribution: NVCOG shall contribute between 4 and 11% of an employee’s gross earnings to all full -time employees enrolled in this plan, using a sliding scal e based upon years of service, starting at 4% for the first year and capping at 11% for the 25 th year. Employees may, but are not required, to make after -tax contributions of up to 5% of their gross salary annually. Merger Provision : Employ ees previously employed at either VCOG or COGCN V as of December 31st, 2014 who have joined NVCOG on or after January 1 st, 2015 may carry forward their retirement benefits from either COGCNV or VCOG, including years of service , with no interruption or chang e in plan terms or level of benefit. These employees shall continue on these plans until NVCOG consolidates and revises its retirement benefits plans. All such employees shall have the option of choosing another plan at this revision date. Professional Du es Recommendation : Employees may submit a request, in writing, that NVCOG reimburse them for membership dues owed to professional organizations recognized by the Executive Director to be related to the mission, programs, or needs of NVCOG. These requests m ust be filed within 30 days of the transmission of funds from the employee to the professional organization. NVCOG Personnel Policy and Employee Manual 5/19/2015 Page 11 of 20 Personnel Policies Standards of Conduct NVCOG strives to maintain high professional standards of service, a positive work environment for its empl oyees, and support efficient operations. NVCOG employees are expected to engage only in courteous, respectful, and appropriate behavior in conformity with professionalism, punctuality, and responsibility when officially or unofficially represented NVCOG. Conduct which is immoral, unsafe, unethical, or illegal will not be tolerated. Employees who do not adhere to such standards in a disruptive manner or a manner which reflects poorly on NVCOG or its employees may be subject to disciplinary action up to and including termination. Conflict of Interest NVCOG upholds a code of ethics to which employees shall adhere. The following policies are intended to minimize the potential for conflicts of interest on the part of employees and for dealing with such issues as they arise. These policies are not an exhaustive representation of the policies present in the NVCOG Code of Ethics. NVCOG Employees shall: a. Perform work on a project only if there is no reasonably obtained belief that direct financial or personal gain to them, their families, or those living in their households will result from such project. They may perform work on such a project if, after written notification is provided to NVCOG and NVCOG , their employer consents to such work and project. b. Accept compen sation, commission, rebate, or other advantages perceived to be related to their public office or employment only from NVCOG . c. Respect the stated or implied confidentiality of information, when such implication shall be understood by the divulgence of infor mation causing embarrassment or detriment to a client or NVCOG . d. Disclos e any and all potential conflicts of interest to the Executive Director. When the Executive Director finds that a conflict of interest is clearly present or may be present, the Executiv e Director shall disqualify the affected employee from participating in all NVCOG activities that could be affected by such conflict of interest. Violation of these policies may lead to disciplinary action, up to and including termination of employment. Outside Employment/Public Service Staff may hold another job outside the NVCOG as long as staff meet and maintain the performance standards of their job with NVCOG. Staff will be evaluated using the NVCOG ’s performance standards for their job and will be su bject to the NVCOG ’s scheduling requirements, regardless of any existing outside work requirements. If outside work interferes with job performance or NVCOG’s normal business hours, and creates a conflict of interest, staff may be asked to terminate outside employment in order to remain an employee with NVCOG All outside employment must be reported to and approved by the Executive Director. Employees are permitted to serve on public boards or committees and run for public office provided they first notify the Executive Director of their intention to serve and that there be no conflict of interest in this activity. Public service should not interfere with the employee’s duties with NVCOG. NVCOG Personnel Policy and Employee Manual 5/19/2015 Page 12 of 20 The Executive Director may not hold another job outside the NVCOG without notifying the NVCOG of this employment and receiving from the NVCOG a written approval. Use of NVCOG Property: Phones, Computers, E -Mail, Internet, etc. NVCOG computers, voice mail, e -mail, Internet access, desks, file cabinets, and other items are NVCOG property and are provided to employees for job -related purposes. Employees shall not use items provided by NVCOG to store personal or confidential informa tion, or for purposes which are illegal, harassing, offensive, or inappropriate. The Internet shall not be used for profit -making ventures, sending chain -letters, or soliciting money. Employees shall exercise care when using NVCOG property and use such pro perty for authorized purposes only. Negligence in the care or use of company property or the unauthorized use of company proper ty are not permitted are cause for disciplinary action up to and including termination of employment. NVCOG reserves the right t o access and inspect all of its property regardless of prior notice. NVCOG has the right to access and review all phone and computer -related communications, electronic mail, voice mail, Internet access, computer files, and information stored on disks, as w ell as any faxes or mail sent to employees at NVCOG’s address. NVCOG property issued to an employee must be returned at the time the employee terminates employment with NVCOG, or if management requests its return. The employee may be liable for the cost of damage or unreturned property. Employees shall not compromise the existing security measures of computer resources including, but not limited to, disabling anti -virus software, altering computer and share permissions, or running unauthorized file sharin g software on workstations. Employees shall not install personal software or hardware on an NVCOG computer including, but not limited to, USB devices, additional network cards, digital assistants, digital cameras and printers. Employees shall use the utm ost discretion when discussing local and remote access to computer resources. Employees are responsible for keeping their network login information (username, password and domain name) private to outside persons. The Executive Director must approve an empl oyee’s disclosure of network log -in information to an outside person, even for work purposes. In such instances, the employee shall immediately change his/her password after the outside person no longer needs to log in to the NVCOG ’s network. Employees sh all not discuss the NVCOG ’s static IP addresses, firewall configuration, password policies, and known computer vulnerabilities with anyone outside the NVCOG . To prevent unauthorized access to computer resources, employees shall log off or lock their works tation if it will be unattended, and shall log off their workstation at the end of each workday. The Executive Director reserves the right to make exceptions to the abo ve measures and authorize a staff member or a consultant to fulfill the request. NVCOG Personnel Policy and Employee Manual 5/19/2015 Page 13 of 20 Dress Code Employees are expected to present a business -like image and exercise good judgment in their attire. Employees should dress appropriately for the standards of their duties, the organizations they are visiting, or the function they are attending. Approp riate attire for daily office wear shall be business casual or as otherwise approved for the office in general by the Executive Director. Personnel Records Individual NVCOG employee personnel records will contain all information that relates to that employ ee’s position, compensation, performance evaluation, or any other information regarding specific employment at NVCOG. Health care insurance and medical records will be maintained in a separate file. Staff will notify the financial manager of any changes in name, home address, contact information, marital status, number of dependents, beneficiary designations, scholastic achievements, individuals to notify in case of an emergency, and so forth. An employee who wishes to receive their personnel folder may su bmit a request to the Executive Director, who will arrange for the employee to review the contents of the personnel folder at an appropriate time and place. Single copies of documents contained in the folder will be provi ded upon request to the employee. T he employee may add a document to the personnel folder, supplementing or disagreeing with records contained within the folder. The Executive Director shall enter a notation in the folder of the fact and date of the employee’s review of the folder. Requests to review a personnel folder may not normally be granted more frequently than twice a year. Substance Abuse policies NVCOG maintains a safe and drug -free work environment. Its policies in furtherance of this environment protect the organization, its employees, customers, reputation, and property from danger which may result from the unauthorized or unlawful use of drugs and alcohol. Alcoholic Beverages and Tobacco : Neither alcoholic beverages nor the use of tobacco products are permitted in any working area of NVCOG. Anyone found bringing alcoholic beverages onto the premises, drinking on the job, or showing physical or behavioral signs of being affected by the consumption of alcohol will not be allowed to work and will be subject to disciplinary action up to and including immediate discharge. The Executive Director may permit exceptions to this policy in advance in writing for the purposes of a special office reception, party, or dinner. Use of Drugs: Anyone selling, using, or possessing illegal substances or misusing or selling legal drugs will be subject to disciplinary action, up to and including immediate discharge. Staff who report to work under the influence of an illegal substance or whose external drug use could cause damage to NVCOG’s bus iness or reputation in any way may be disciplined or terminated. The legal use of drugs is permitted to the extent that it does not adversely affect the performance of duty, the safety of the user, or the safety of others. Rehabilitation: Drug abuse and a lcoholism are recognized as conditions for which there are effective treatment and rehabilitation. Employees, who suspect they may have a drug or alcohol problem, even in its early stages, are encouraged to seek diagnosis, and to follow through with the tr eatment prescribed by qualified professionals before disciplinary action become necessary. NVCOG Personnel Policy and Employee Manual 5/19/2015 Page 14 of 20 An employee’s refusal to accept an NVCOG referral for diagnosis or to follow prescribed treatment may result in termination of employment. Any NVCOG referral for di agno sis and treatment will be based solely on job performance and other employment -related factors. On -the -Job Accidents Any on -the -job accident must be reported to the Executive Director immediately. The initial Injury Report must be completed as soon as possible. This will enable NVCOG to assist staff in obtaining proper medical treatment at the time of injury and completing the appropriate documents required under the Worker’s Compensation laws and insurance. Inclement Weather No leave will be granted f or inclement weather if the office is officially open. In that case, every effort should be made by employees to report to work. Tardiness may be excused only by the Executive Director. Early closing of the office will be at the discretion of the Executive Director. The Executive Director may declare the office to be physically closed in the event of inclement weather. The Executive Director may direct staff in positions capable of remote work to fulfill their duties remotely. Disciplinary Action NVCOG ha s access to types of disciplinary action it may take in response to an employee’s substandard performance or conduct, including the following measures: Oral and Written Reprimand The Executive Director may issue an oral or written reprimand to an employee as notice that the employee’s performance or conduct is substandard and to advise the employee of NVCOG expectations. Disciplinary Probation The Executive Director may place an employee on disciplinary probation for up to three months. The employee will receive written notice stating the reasons for the probation and the effective start and end date of the action. At the expiration of the period , the executive Director will notify the employee in writing that the probation has been lifted and whether furthe r disciplinary action will be taken. Suspension The Executive Director may temporarily suspend an employee for cause without pay for no more than five consecutive working days. The employee will receive a written notice of suspension which documents the sp ecific acts or omissions on which the suspension is based, the expected corrective action, and the effective start and end dates of the suspension. Dismissal / Termination If, after remedial and/or disciplinary measures have been tried and an employee’s u nsatisfactory behavior does not improve, termination of employment may be necessary. The Executive Director may dismiss an employee for cause upon giving the employee written notice of the reasons for discharge and the discharge’s effective date. Immediate dismissal may occur in light of serious offenses or circumstances including but not limited to: theft, acts of violence, conviction of a felony, or reporting to work in an unfit condition. NVCOG Personnel Policy and Employee Manual 5/19/2015 Page 15 of 20 Grievance Procedure An employee who has a complaint or grievance should make contact with the Executive Director within ten (10) working days after the instigating incident. The Executive Director shall initiate an informal conference with the employee and all staff involved with the notice of right to file a grievance if a satisfactory resolution to the problem is not accomplished. This shall be completed within twenty (20) working days of the complaint. If the aggrieved party is not satisfied, the matter will move to the formal complaint procedure. The complaint must b e written in detail, signed, and submitted to the Executive Director within ten (10) working days of results of the informal conference. The Executive Director shall conduct an investigation to attempt a resolution and will present a written determination of the facts based on their investigation. The Executive Director shall make a decision and notify in writing all parties concerned within fifteen (15) working days of the receipt of the formal written complaint. If the parties do not accept the decision o f the Executive Director, a request for hearing must be submitted in writing within ten (10) working days after such decision is rendered. The hearing body is composed of NVCOG officers and will send notice of the hearing in writing to all interested parti es within ten (10) working days of the request for hearing. The notice shall include a statement of the complaint; list of invitees; date, place, and time of hearing (which shall be held within twenty (2) working days of the request for hearing) and; refer ences to the relevant laws, procedure, grievance procedures, and pertinent regulations. Those involved may submit written briefs and may bring witnesses and evidence. The complainant has the right to counsel or representatives. The hearing body shall, wit hin fifteen (15) working days of the hearing, send all parties and their representatives a written determination. This determination shall include a state that the hearing was held, it’s time and date, who was present, a statement of the complaint, a findi ng of facts, the final decision, that decision’s rationale, and any action to be taken by complainant and/or the Executive Director. Other Policies Equal Opportunity Statement NVCOG policy and the Executive Director’s attitude is expressed in the following : The Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments hereby declares that equal employment opportunity is available to all without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, national or igin, marital status, physical handicap, criminal record, ancestry, present or past history of mental disorder, mental retardation, or learning disability, including, but not limited to, blindness, except where any of the above is a bona fide occupational qualification or need, or political beliefs in conformance with Title VI and VII of the 1964 U.S. Civil Rights Act, President ial Executive Orders 11246 and 11375, and the Connecticut Governor’s Executive Orders 3 and 17,1 and Connecticut General Statutes – P.A. 90 -330. Moreover, this Council will assure that no members of a protected class (African -Americans, Spanish -Speaking Americans, Gender and Sexual Minorities, Asian -Americans, Aleuts, the elderly, women and the disabled) will be NVCOG Personnel Policy and Employee Manual 5/19/2015 Page 16 of 20 discriminated against in any area of the employment process. This will include rates of pa y and compensation, upgrade s, promotions, transfers, demotions, layoffs and terminations. This policy is implemented by the following actions: 1. Distribution — This resolution is distr ibuted to all current employees and all job applicants. 2. Coordination — The Executive Director coordinates equal opportunity efforts. 3. Recruiting a. When recruiting, employment advertisements are placed in the Waterbury Republican and American newspape rs which serve the largest number of minority group people in the Region. b. Professional positions are advertised nationally. Advertisements are sent to all schools with departments of city planning or similar programs. Professional positions are also adv ertised in the American Planning Association JOBS Publication. When possible, the NVCOG interviews for positions at national planning conferences. When recruiting, contact is maintained with the following local organizations which are often in a position t o refer qualified minority applicants: United Way – (Association of Private Charitable Agencies in Region) N.O.W. – (Local Community Action Program [CAP] Agency) Connecticut Department of Labor, Employment Division d. Present employees are encouraged to re fer minority applicants. e. “Equal Opportunity Employer” is placed in all published advertisements, and the fact stressed in contacts with professional organizations, schools, colleges and employment agencies. f. When sending out “Requests for Proposals” to consultants for technical studies, RFP’s are sent to minority firms. 4. Hiring a. Hiring of the Executive Director is the responsibility of the NVCOG , who has adopted these policies. The Executive Director is responsible for selection of his staff withi n appropriations established by the NVCOG . He is instructed to follow a policy of Equal Employment Opportunity in his recruitment and selection. Other staff members who occasionally interview prospective employees are also so instructed by the Executive Director. 5. Sub -professional Interns and Planning Training a. Minority group persons are encouraged to pursue careers in planning through the following measures: 1. Planning internships are made available to minority group members when the work program call s for personnel of this skill category. 2. In hiring work -study students, low income and minority group members are given primary consideration. 3. Scheduled staff meetings and attendance at planning related meetings and conferences assist in broadening planning knowledge and interest. b. All employees are encouraged to increase their skills and job potential through participation in training programs. 6. Placement and Promotion a. Placement and promotion decisions are made by the NVCOG who has adopted this policy. The Executive Director, who makes placement and promotion recommendations to the NVCOG , is instructed to do so without discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, marital status, physical handicap, learning disability, criminal record, ancestry, or political beliefs. b. Promotion of minority employees is encouraged as they increase their skill and job potential level. 7. Pay, Fringe Benefits, and Working Conditions NVCOG Personnel Policy and Employee Manual 5/19/2015 Page 17 of 20 a. Non -discriminatory pay, fringe benefits a nd working conditions are assured by periodic examination of present employees performing equivalent duties and adjusting for inequities. 8. Contracts — Contracts with consultants and other contractors doing work for the Council contain non -discrimination clauses, and the Council encourages non -discrimination practices by contracting with those who have in practice policies on non -discrimination. 9. Monitoring of Policies — These policies are monitored; a semi -annual report prepared; and changes and addit ions to these policies made when and where appropriate. II. Equal Employment Officer The Executive Director of the Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments, located at 49 Leavenworth St. Suite 303, Waterbury, CT, 6702 is the NVCOG’s equal employment office r. III Employment Expansion and Numerical Targets Given the funding vagaries of the NVCOG ‘s federal, state, and local funding sources, a time table for further staff improvement is impossible. It is pledged that when staff leave and/or when new openings occur, the NVCOG will continue the types of efforts described above and will continue to be alert to and take advantage of and for the Volunteer programs, work -study programs, JTPA, Summer CAP programs, and others of assistance to the minority, female and underemployed persons of this NVCOG region . Affirmative Action Policy Statement It is the policy and practice of the NVCOG to assure that no person will be discriminated against or denied the benefits of any activity, program or employment process receiving publ ic funds, in or in part, in the areas of employment, recruitment, advertising, hiring, upgrading, pro moting, transferring, demoting, layoffs, terminations, rehiring, employment and/or rates of pay and other compensations. This firm is an Aff irmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer and is str ongly committed to all policies which will afford equal opportunity to all qualified persons without regard to an individual’s race, color, religious creed, age, sex, marital status, national origin or a ncestry, sex ual orientation, the request or requirement for genetic background information, present or past his tory of mental disorder, mental retardation, learning disability or physical disability, including by not limited to, blindness, conviction of a crime unless provisions of Connecticut Gen Statues 46a -60(b), 45a -80(b), or 46a – 81(b) are controllingor there is a bona fide occupational qualification excluding individuals in any of the protected groups. Such action shall include: Employment, upgrading, promoting, demotion or termination; rates of pay or other forms of compensation; and selection of training, including app renticeship, pre -apprenticeship and/or on -the -job training. This policy and practice applies to all pers ons, particularly those who are members of the protected classes identified as being African Amer ican, Hispanic, Asian, American Indian, Women and persons with disabilities This firm will implement, monitor, enforce and achieve full compliance with this Affirmative Action Policy Statement in conjunction with the applicable federal and state laws, regulations and executive orders, and the E.E.O. contract provisions listed below: NVCOG Personnel Policy and Employee Manual 5/19/2015 Page 18 of 20 1. Civil Rights Act of 1964 as amended 2. Presidential Executive Order 11246 as amended by 11375 3. Title 23 U.S.C. 140 4. Title 49 C.F.R. Part 26 5. Governor’s Executive Orders #3, #9, #11, and #17 6. Connecticut Code of Fair Practices (46a -70 -81) 7. Connecticut Fair Employment Practices Act 8. American with Disabilities Act of 1990 9. Public Act No.91 -58 10. Civil Rights Act of 1991 11. Specific Equal Employment Opportunity Responsibilities 12. Required Contract Provisions Federal Aid Construction Contracts 13. A(76) Affirmative Action Requirements 14. Training Special Provision 15. Minority Business Enterprises as Subcontractors 16. Standard Federal Equal Employment Opportunity Construction Contractor Specification 17. Nondiscrimination Act 18. Sexual Harassment 46a -60(a) -8 19. Connecticut Credit Discrimination Law 36 -436 through 43 9 20. Title I of the State and Local Fiscal Assistance Act of 1972 In implementing this policy and ensuring that equal opportunity is being provided to protect class members, each time a hiring opportunity occurs the NVCOG will contact and request referral s from minority and female organizations, referral sources, and media sources. All advertising will emphasize that the NVCOG is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. In order to substantiate the NVCOG ’s efforts and affirmative actions to prov ide equal opportunity, the NVCOG will maintain and submit, as requested, documentation such as referral request correspondence, copies of advertisements utilized and follow -up documentation to substantiate that efforts were made in good faith. This firm wi ll maintain internal EEO/affirmative action audit procedures and reporting, as well as record keeping systems. It is understood by the NVCOG , including the Equal Employment Opportun ity Officer and supervisory and managerial personnel that failure to effec tively implement, monitor and enforce the NVCOG ’s affirmative action program and failure to adequately document the affirmative ac tions taken and efforts made to recruit and hire minority and female applicants, in accordance with our affirmative action pro gram in each instance of hire, will result in the NVCOG being required to recommit itself to a modified and more stringent affirmative action program prior to receiving approval. It is recognized that an approved affirmative action program is a prerequisit e for performing services for state and federal contracting agencies. Managers and supervisors are being advised of their responsibilities to ensure the success of the program. The ultimate responsibility for the Affirmative Action Program rests with the Executive Director . However, day – to-day duties will be coordinated the Equal Opportunity Officer for the NVCOG . NVCOG Personnel Policy and Employee Manual 5/19/2015 Page 19 of 20 Equal Opportunity Complaint Procedure The NVCOG’s Complaint Procedure will address discrimination complaints regarding race, color, religion, age , sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, marital status, physical disability (including but not limited to blindness), criminal record, national origin or ancestry or mental disorder (or history thereof), from both current and prospective employees. The se individuals have the right to make full utilization of this Complaint Procedure without in any way jeopardizing their current or prospect employment status. The components of the NVCOG‘S Complaint Procedure are the following: 1. The Equal Opportunity E mployment Officer will receive all writte n complaints of discrimination. These may be direct from the employee or upon referral from a supervisor who has received a complaint from an employee. 2. All discrimination complaints filed under this procedure wi ll be accep ted for investigation up to and including thirty (30) days after the date of the alleged discriminatory act. 3. All complaints will be recorded on the “Notice of Discrimination Complaint” form and signed by the complainant. At this time, the co mplainant will be counseled as to th e other avenues of redress open to him or her; i.e., the complaint procedure of the Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities and/or the Connecticut Department of Transportation Office of Contract Compliance. 4. The Office of Contract Compliance and the Transportatio n commissioner will be notified simultaneously of all complaints and of the complaint’s ultimate resolution. 5. All complaints will be investigated and processed by the NVCOG ‘s Equal Employment Opportunit y Officer within thirty (30) days after their receipt. 6. The complainant will be notified, in writing, by the Equal Employmen t Opportunity Officer regarding the results of the investigation and the final disposition of the co mplaint, including any propos ed remedial action. 7. Should the complainant disagree with the Equal Opportunity Emplo yment Officer’s decision, he or she can still avail himself or herself of any or all, of the other avenues of redress previous ly explained (see Number 3). 8. In the event of a complaint against the Equal Opportunity Employmen t Officer, complainants will be advised to utilize the Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities complaint procedure. 9. The Equal Employment Opportunity Officer will take the necessary step s to ensure the confidentiality of all Title VII complaint records and of any counseling done in the course of the complaint procedure. Sexual Harassment Policy It is the established policy of the NVCOG to ensure equal employment opportunity and to prevent d iscrimination in all practices. Sexual Harassment is a type of sex discrimination. It is prohibited by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, as amended, and by Connecticut General Statute 46a -60 (a) (8) as a Discriminatory Employment Practice. NVCOG Personnel Policy and Employee Manual 5/19/2015 Page 20 of 20 Sexual Harassm ent is defined as: “any unwelcome sexual advance or re quests for sexual favors or any conduct of a sexual nature when (1) submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual’s employment , (2) submission t o or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as the basis for employment decisions affecting such individual, or (3) such conduct has the purpose or effect of substantially interfering with an individual’s work performance or creating an intimid ating, hostile or offensive working environment .” In addition, Sexual Harassment can include rude or offensive language or jokes of a sexual nature. Sexual Harassment will not be tolerated by NVCOG and will be grounds for disciplinary action. Complaints of sexual harassment will be processed by our Equal Employment Opportunity Officer through the establish ed Affirmative Action Complaint Procedure. It is not the NVCOG’s intention to regulate social relationships that are freely entered into by employees. However, it is our affirmative duty to develop and maintain a workplace free of sexual harassment and intimidation. We expect the full support and cooperation of every employee to achieve this goal. Drug -Free Workplace Policy Statement NVCOG prohibits unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession, or use of a controlled substance in the NVCOG workplace. Employee violation of the policy will be subject to disciplinary action as specified i n the NVCOG’s personnel policies. To fulfill this policy, as required by Public Law 100 -690 Title V, Subtitle D, 41 USC 701 et seq., NVCOG will provide the policy to employees as part of the Council’s personnel policies. Employees must notify NVCOG in wri ting within five days of a conviction on any criminal drug statue violation. NVCOG is required to notify federal grantor agencies within ten days after receiving a notice from employee. NVCOG may also bear additional notification responsibilities from othe r grantors. NVCOG will inform employees convicted of any criminal drug statute violation of its notification responsibilities after the convicted employee has submitted their notification of conviction. CODE OF ETHICS [Inset approved Code of Ethics as an a ddendum ]