Naugatuck Valley 2020 Census logo

The 2020 Census at a Glance

Once every decade, the federal government conducts a census of the entire population to count everyone in the United States and record basic information about them. Our nation’s founders believed this data was so important that they mandated the decennial census in the Constitution.

The census is much more than just a head count. It provides a picture of our nation that helps determine where to build new schools, hospitals, and businesses; how over $675 billion in federal funding is distributed; and how congressional seats are apportioned. It also helps us see how our communities have changed over time. That’s why an accurate count is so important. 

To see how much federal funding is relying on Census data, please refer to this study by George Washington University. Each program on the list relies on Census data to determine how much funding is distributed to each state.      Hint: its over $10 Billion each year!

The Census is Safe and Simple

There are only nine questions on the census. They ask very basic demographic questions: who lives in the household; how they are related; their age, sex, and race; whether they own or rent their house; and their phone number. All personal information recorded by the U.S. Census Bureau is not shared with any other department or branch of the government under federal law.  Data is summarized and distributed by census blocks at the smallest scale. 

Ways to Respond

Methods to respond to the 2020 Census

This will be the first census offered online and over the phone. Most households will receive a mailing with instructions to participate online or by phone, while a more limited amount will receive mailings including a paper questionnaire, as well as the online or phone options. View the Initial Contact map to see which options are being sent in your area.

Explore the questions on the form on the Census Bureau’s website. Written response forms will be available in English and Spanish.  Online response forms and over the phone will have 12 languages available while residents can request video or written aids in 59 languages. Personnel is also available at regional offices for those to respond in person with American Sign Language.

Respond online at my2020census.gov.

If you are in need of assistance responding, call 1-844-330-2020 or local organizations and municipal governments are willing to help you and your household get counted.  

Information needed to fill out the Census:

  • Your Census ID, located on your Census invitation.
  • Information for each person living in your home:
    • Names
    • Dates of Birth
    • Race & Ethnicity

When is it?

Census Day is April 1, 2020, but counting begins before then.

Census takers have already begun to seek participation in hard-to-count areas and in May, will go door-to-door in low-response areas. The U.S. Census Bureau states “by not trying to capture a response from everyone in a single day, or even a single month, they will make sure everyone has a better user experience and the ability to complete the census on their own time.”

The online and telephone self-respond options will open in mid-March and will remain open until the door-to-door follow-up operation is complete.  They will also stagger the mailing option to respond throughout the country to keep the user experience as smooth as possible on both options.

March 2020
March 12th
Households will begin receiving official Census Bureau mail with detailed information on how to respond to the 2020 Census online, by phone, or by mail.
March 2020
April 2020
April 1st
Census Day! By this time, every home will have received an invitation to participate in the 2020 Census. When you respond to the census, you'll tell the Census Bureau where you live as of this date. Reminders will be mailed out if you have not responded.
April 2020
May - July 2020
May 1st
Census takers will begin visiting homes that have not self-responded to the 2020 Census to help make sure everyone is counted.
May - July 2020
December 2020
December 31st
The Census Bureau will deliver counts presented statistically as Census geographies to the President and Congress by the year's end as required by law.
December 2020

Count Yourself in the Right Place.

In general, you should count yourself where you live and sleep most of the time. But pay attention if you are:

  • Completing Your Household’s Form. When responding, count any children, including newborns, who usually live and sleep at your home. If they split time between homes, count them where they are on April 1, 2020.
  • A Recent Mover. Count yourself at your new address if you moved in by April 1, 2020.
  • A Renter. Count yourself where you live. Even if you don’t own the home, you need to participate. Don’t forget your family and roommates.
  • A College Student. You’ll be counted at your dorm since you live there most of the time. Even if you live off-campus, count yourself where you live and sleep the most of the time. This includes international students.
  • A Resident of a Group Facility. Census Bureau employees will work with representatives of the building to ensure you are counted. This includes nursing homes, group homes, shelters, and correctional facilities.

Census Materials

The following materials are online documents available for use on other websites or for printing purposes.

The U.S. Census Bureau is Hiring

The U.S. Census Bureau is continuing it’s recruiting efforts to hire temporary, part-time census takers for the 2020 Census in communities across the state. The positions offer competitive pay, flexible hours, paid training, and weekly paychecks. To determine the pay rate in a specific area, learn more about these positions, or apply for one of these positions, visit 2020census.gov/jobs.

Complete Count Committees

Naugatuck Valley Complete Count Committee Kickoff

When community members are informed, they are more likely to respond to the census. State and local governments; community based organizations; faith-based groups; schools; businesses; the media; and others play a key role in developing partners to educate and motivate residents to participate in the 2020 Census.

Municipalities and organizations in our region have formed Complete Count Committees in preparation of the 2020 Census:

  • City of Ansonia 
  • Town of Beacon Falls
  • Town of Bethlehem
  • City of Bristol
  • Town of Cheshire
  • City of Derby
  • Borough of Naugatuck
  • Town of Oxford
  • City of Waterbury
  • Naugatuck Valley Complete Count Committee
    • includes Ansonia, Beacon Falls, Derby, Naugatuck, Oxford, Seymour & Shelton
  • Connecticut’s Third Congressional District
    • includes Ansonia, Beacon Falls, Derby, Naugatuck, Prospect, Seymour and parts of Shelton & Waterbury
  • Connecticut’s Fourth Congressional District
    • includes Oxford and the other part of Shelton
  • Along with many organizations and businesses in the region.

See how you and your community can get involved with a Complete Count Committee.

Tracking Responses

The above map shows delayed live counts of self-response rates for the 2020 Census.

Learning about each hard-to-survey area allows the U.S. Census Bureau to create a tailored communication and partnership campaign, and to plan for field resources including hiring staff with language skills. The Response Outreach Area Mapper (ROAM) application was developed before the 2020 Census to make it easier to identify hard-to-survey areas and to provide a socioeconomic and demographic characteristic profile of these areas using American Community Survey (ACS) estimates available in the Planning Database. These and other efforts can improve response rates. Some of these hard-to-survey areas are in the Naugatuck Valley region .

What Has Been Done in Preparation to the 2020 Census

NVCOG and its member municipalities participated in the Local Update of Census Addresses (LUCA) Operation in the spring of 2018.  Only house and unit numbers with road and street names were used during this process. In the spring of 2018, all of our municipalities participated in this process, with NVCOG completing the work for 17 and assisting the other two. NVCOG submitted 4932 housing units and made 1972 address corrections.

In August 2019, we received feedback from the U.S. Census on the submission of new addresses and corrections. The Census Bureau has accepted 91% (4506) of the added units and 85% (1685) of corrections submitted. By using the regional average of 2.6 people per household, there are now an additional 11,700 people to be counted in April 2020.

Some of our municipalities participated in a chance to add more addresses to the Census’ address database.  Seven municipalities designated NVCOG to add new and planned residential construction from March 2018 (the time of the first LUCA Operation step) and any that will be habitable by April 1, 2020.  This process added another 271 addresses in the region. 

During the entire LUCA Operation, an additional 12,400 people can now be counted, hopefully gaining more federal support for the region.

In the spring of 2019, NVCOG participated in the Participant Statistical Areas Program (PSAP) to review and update selected statistical area boundaries for 2020 Census data tabulation, following U.S. Census Bureau guidelines and criteria.  We created an online map showing existing boundaries and proposed boundary changes.

For Your Safety

The Census Bureau will never ask for:

• Social Security numbers
• Bank or credit card account numbers
• Money or donations
• Anything on behalf of a political party
• Citizenship status
• Participation through email

If a census taker comes to your home, they will have an ID with their photo, a U.S. Department of Commerce watermark, and an expiration date. They will not ask to come in nor ask you to step outside.

If would like to avoid census takers coming to your door, fill out the Census online before mid-April.

 

Report Suspected Fraud

Call the Census Bureau at 1-800-923-8282 or your local police department.

Example Census invitation envelope
Example of Census invitation in envelope.

Countdown to Census Day

Days
Hours

Helpful Links

United States Census homepage for all information on the upcoming Census and is available en español.

Connecticut Counts 2020 is the state’s go-to-page for 2020 Census events and materials.

U.S. Census Jobs for temporary positions needed to support three offices within Connecticut.

Naugatuck Valley Regional Profile is based on data collected by the U.S. Census Bureau.

View this website in español. For more languages, click on “English” at the top of this page and select from the drop-down your preferred langauage.

Staff Contact:

Richard Crowther Jr.

GIS Analyst

rcrowther@nvcogct.gov

NVCOG Census News

Census Partnership Badge

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