[Type the document title] [Type the document subtitle] [Pick the date] Oldread, Krystal Exis tin g Co n d itio n s TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary ………………………….. …………………………………………………………………………. i Transit and Commuter R ail Services ………………………….. ………………………………………………….. i Transit Services ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………………… i Commuter Rai l………………………….. ………………………………………………………………………… ii Parking ………………………….. …………………………………………………………………………………….iii Travel Patterns ………………………….. ……………………………………………………………………………iii Existing R oad Network ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………….iii 1. I ntroduction ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………………………. 1 2. Existing Tr ansit Services ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………… 3 2. 1 Local Fixed R oute B us Transit ………………………….. …………………………………………………….. 3 2. 1. 1 CTtransit Waterbury ………………………….. ………………………………………………………….. 3 2.1.2 CTtransit New Haven ………………………….. ……………………………………………………….. 13 2.1.3 Greater Bridgeport Transit ……………………………………………………………………………… 19 2. 1. 4 Programed I mprovements ………………………….. …………………………………………………. 27 2.2 Passenger Rail Service ………………………….. ……………………………………………………………. 30 2.2.1 Travel Times ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………….. 31 2. 2. 2 Equipment ………………………….. ……………………………………………………………………. 33 2. 2. 3 Funding ………………………….. ……………………………………………………………………….. 33 2.2.4 Infrastr ucture ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………… 34 2.2.5 Ridership ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………………. 35 2. 2. 6 Programed I mprovements ………………………….. …………………………………………………. 36 2. 3 Connecting Services ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………. 38 2.3.1 Paratransit ………………………….. ……………………………………………………………………. 39 2.3.2 Comm uter B us Service ………………………….. ……………………………………………………… 39 2.3.3 Intercity Bus Service ………………………….. ………………………………………………………… 40 2.3.4 Ferry Service ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………….. 41 2.3.5 Taxi/TNC Services/Car -Sharing ………………………….. ……………………………………………. 41 2.3.6 Rideshare Services ……………………………………………………………………………………….. 41 3. Parking ………………………….. …………………………………………………………………………………… 43 3. 1 Methodolog y ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………………. 43 3.2 Station Parking Capacity and Utilization ………………………….. ………………………………………. 43 3.2.1 Waterbury ………………………….. …………………………………………………………………….. 43 3.2.2 Naugatuck ………………………….. …………………………………………………………………….. 46 3.2.3 Beacon Falls ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………….. 48 3.2.4 Seymour ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………………. 50 3.2.5 Ansonia ………………………….. ……………………………………………………………………….. 52 3.2.6 Derby/Shelton ………………………….. ……………………………………………………………….. 54 3. 3 Parking Key Finding s ………………………….. ……………………………………………………………… 56 4. Travel Patterns ………………………….. …………………………………………………………………………. 57 4.1 Modal Split ………………………….. …………………………………………………………………………. 57 Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 4.2 Travel Time ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………………… 57 4. 3 Journey to Work ………………………….. …………………………………………………………………… 57 4. 4 Key Finding s f or Corridor ………………………….. ………………………………………………………… 59 5. Existing R oad Network ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………… 61 5.1 Traffic Analysis ………………………….. …………………………………………………………………….. 61 Traffic Key Finding s ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………… 63 5. 2 Travel Times and Speeds ………………………….. ………………………………………………………… 64 5.2.1 Highway ………………………….. ……………………………………………………………………….. 64 5.2.2 Transit ………………………….. …………………………………………………………………………. 66 FIGURES Fig ure 1. Goals and Objectives ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………………………..1 Fig ure 2. Existing Transit Services ………………………….. …………………………………………………………………………….2 Fig ure 3. CT Transit Waterbury System Map………………………….. ………………………………………………………………..3 Figure 4. CT Transit Waterbury Corridor Routes ………………………….. ……………………………………………………………4 Figure 5. Route 441 Ma p ………………………….. ……………………………………………………………………………………….6 Fig ure 6. R oute 441 B oarding s by Trip ……………………………………………………………………………………………………6 Figure 7. Route 441 activity by stop ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………………….6 Figure 8. Route 442 Map ………………………….. ……………………………………………………………………………………….7 Fig ure 9. R oute 442 B oarding s by Trip ……………………………………………………………………………………………………7 Figure 10. Route 442 activity by stop ……………………………………………………………………………………………………..7 Figure 11. Route 470X Map ………………………….. ……………………………………………………………………………………8 Fig ure 12. Map of D ivision Street/Church Street B us Stop I ssue ………………………….. ………………………………………..8 Fig ure 13. R oute 470X B oarding s by Trip………………………….. …………………………………………………………………….8 Figure 14 . Route 470X AM activity by stop ………………………….. …………………………………………………………………9 Figure 15. Route 470X PM activity by stop ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………….9 Figure 16. Route 479X Map ………………………….. ……………………………………………………………………………………9 Fig ure 17. R oute 479X B oarding s by Trip………………………….. ………………………………………………………………….. 10 Figure 18 . Route 479X AM activity by stop ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………. 10 Figure 19. Route 479X PM activity by stop ………………………….. ……………………………………………………………….. 10 Figure 20. Routes 471/472/473 Map ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………………. 10 Figure 21. Routes 471/473 Boardings by Trip ………………………….. ……………………………………………………………. 11 Figure 22. Routes 471/473 activity by stop ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 11 Fig ure 23. R oute 472 B oarding s by Trip ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 11 Figure 24. Route 472 activity by stop …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 11 Fig ure 25. FY2105 CTtransit Waterbury Funding ………………………….. ………………………………………………………… 12 Figure 26. CTtransit New Haven System Map ………………………….. ……………………………………………………………. 14 Fig ure 27. CTtransit New Haven Corridor R outes ………………………….. ……………………………………………………….. 1 5 Figure 28. Route 255 Map ………………………….. …………………………………………………………………………………… 15 Fig ure 29. R oute 255 B oarding s by Trip ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 16 Fig ure 30. R oute 255 activity by stop Outboun d ………………………….. ………………………………………………………… 16 Exis tin g Co n d itio n s Fig ure 31. R oute 255 activity by stop I nbound ………………………….. …………………………………………………………… 16 Figure 32. Route 229 Map ………………………….. …………………………………………………………………………………… 17 Fig ure 33. R oute 229 B oarding s by Trip ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 17 Fig ure 34. R oute 229 activity by stop Outboun d ………………………….. ………………………………………………………… 17 Fig ure 35. R oute 229 activity by stop I nbound ………………………….. …………………………………………………………… 17 Fig ure 36. FY2105 CTtransit New Haven Funding ………………………….. ……………………………………………………….. 18 Figure 37. Greater Bridgeport Transit System Map ………………………….. ……………………………………………………… 20 Figure 38. GBT Corridor Routes ………………………….. …………………………………………………………………………….. 22 Figure 39. GBT Route 15 Map ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………………………. 22 Fig ure 40. R oute 15 B oarding s by Trip …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 23 Figure 41. Route 15 activity by stop ………………………….. ……………………………………………………………………….. 23 Figure 42. GBT Route 22x Map ………………………….. ……………………………………………………………………………… 23 Figure 43. Route 22x activity by stop ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………………. 24 Figure 44. GBT Route 23 Map ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………………………. 24 Fig ure 45. R oute 23 B oarding s by Trip …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 24 Figure 46. Route 23 activity by stop ………………………….. ……………………………………………………………………….. 25 Figure 47. FY2105 GBT Funding ………………………….. …………………………………………………………………………….. 25 Figure 48. Waterbury Service Improvements for Corridor Communities ………………………….. ……………………………. 27 Fig ure 49. CTtransit Waterbury Prog ramed I mprovements Timeline ………………………….. ………………………………… 28 Fig ure 50. CTtransit New Haven P rog ramed I mprovements Timeline ………………………….. ……………………………….. 29 Fig ure 51. GBT Prog ramed I mprovements Timeline …………………………………………………………………………………. 30 Fig ure 52. WB L Weekday Schedule ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………………… 31 Figure 53. WBL Weekend/Holiday Schedule ………………………….. ……………………………………………………………… 31 Figure 54. Travel Time between WBL Stations ………………………….. …………………………………………………………… 32 Fig ure 55. WB L Outbound R idership Map …………………………………………………………………………………………….. 36 Fig ure 56. WB L I nbound R idership Map ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 36 Fig ure 57. WB L Programmed I mprovements ………………………….. …………………………………………………………….. 37 Fig ure 58. Connecting Transportation Services in the Corrid or ………………………….. ……………………………………….. 38 Fig ure 59. D owntown Waterbury Hartford Express B us Circulation ………………………………………………………………. 39 Figure 60. Waterbury Rail Statio n Parking Map………………………….. ………………………………………………………….. 45 Fig ure 61. Naugatuck Station Parking ………………………….. ……………………………………………………………………… 46 Figure 62. Naugatuck Rail Station Parking Map ………………………….. ………………………………………………………….. 47 Fig ure 63. B ea con Fa lls St ation Parking………………………….. ……………………………………………………………………. 48 Figure 64. Beacon Falls Station Parking ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 49 Fig ure 65. Seymour St a t ion Parking ………………………….. ……………………………………………………………………….. 50 Fig ure 66. Seymour Station Parking Map ………………………….. …………………………………………………………………. 51 Fig ure 67. Ansonia Station Parking ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 52 Fig ure 68. Ansonia Station Parking Map ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 53 Fig ure 69. D erby Station Parking ………………………….. …………………………………………………………………………… 54 Fig ure 70. D erby/Shelton Station Parking Map ………………………….. ………………………………………………………….. 55 Fig ure 71. Mode Split for Commute to Work ………………………….. …………………………………………………………….. 57 Figure 72. Travel Time for Commute to Work ………………………….. ……………………………………………………………. 57 Exis tin g Co n d itio n s Figure 73. Origin Destination Patterns Within Corridor Commu nities (C orrelates with Table 41) ………………………….. . 58 Fig ure 74. Corridor Community Empl oyees Place of R esidence ………………………….. ………………………………………. 59 Figure 75. Corridor Flow Patterns ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………………….. 59 Figure 76. Route 8 ADT by Mile Post ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………………. 61 Fig ure 77 AM and PM Peak Hour Volumes ………………………….. ……………………………………………………………….. 62 Fig ure 78 Trip Times for R oute 8 ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 64 Fig ure 79 NPR D MS Da ta – AM Peak Travel Speeds …………………………………………………………………………………… 65 Fig ure 80 NPR D MS Da ta – PM Peak Travel Speeds ………………………….. ………………………………………………………. 65 Figure 81. GBT Route 15 Schedule Travel Times ………………………….. …………………………………………………………. 67 Figure 82. GBT Route 15 Schedule Travel Times ………………………….. …………………………………………………………. 67 Fig ure 83. GBT R oute 23 Scheduled Travel Time ………………………….. ………………………………………………………… 68 Fig ure 84. CTtransit Waterbury R oute 470 Scheduled Travel Time ………………………….. …………………………………… 69 Fig ure 85. CTtransit Waterbury R oute 472 Scheduled Travel Time ………………………….. …………………………………… 69 Fig ure 86. CTtransit Waterbury R oute 471 Scheduled Travel Time ………………………….. …………………………………… 70 Fig ure 87. CTtransit Waterbury R oute 479X Scheduled Travel Time ………………………….. …………………………………. 70 Fig ure 88. CTtransit Waterbury R oute 441 Schedul ed Travel Time ………………………….. …………………………………… 71 Fig ure 89. CTtransit Waterbury R oute 42 Scheduled Travel Time ………………………….. ……………………………………. 71 Fig ure 90. Express R oute 925/928 Scheduled Travel Time B etween the Green and Waterbury Station ……………………. 72 Fig ure 91. CTtransit New Haven R oute 229 Scheduled Travel Time ………………………….. …………………………………. 72 Fig ure 92. CTtransit New Haven R oute 255 Scheduled Travel Time ………………………….. ………………………………….. 73 TABLES Table 1. Waterbury B us R outes ………………………….. ……………………………………………………………………………….5 Table 2. Route 441 Performance Statistics ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………….6 Table 3. Route 442 Performance Statistics ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………….7 Table 4. Route 470X Performance Stat istics ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………..8 Table 5. Route 479X Performance Statistics ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………..9 Table 6. Routes 471/473 Performance Statistics ………………………….. ………………………………………………………… 10 Table 7. Route 472 Performance Statistics ………………………….. ……………………………………………………………….. 11 Table 8. CTtransit Fares …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 12 Table 9. CTtransit Waterbury Fleet Summary ………………………….. ……………………………………………………………. 13 Table 10. CTtransit Waterbury Fleet Condition ………………………….. ………………………………………………………….. 13 Table 11. New Haven B us R outes in Study Corridor ………………………….. …………………………………………………….. 14 Table 12. Route 255 Performance Statistics ………………………….. ……………………………………………………………… 15 Table 13. J Whitney Avenue Performance Statistics …………………………………………………………………………………. 16 Table 14. CTtransit New Haven Fleet Summary ………………………………………………………………………………………. 18 Table 15. CTtransit New Have n Fleet Condition ………………………….. …………………………………………………………. 18 Table 16. Greater B ridgeport Transit B us R outes …………………………………………………………………………………….. 21 Table 17. Route 15 Performance Statistics ………………………….. ……………………………………………………………….. 22 Table 18. Route 23 Performance Statistics ………………………….. ……………………………………………………………….. 24 Table 19. GBT Fares ………………………….. …………………………………………………………………………………………… 25 Table 20. GBT Fleet Summary ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………………………. 26 Table 21. GBT Fleet Summery by the End of 2017 ………………………….. ………………………………………………………. 26 Exis tin g Co n d itio n s Table 22. GBT Fleet Condition ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………………………. 26 Table 23. WBL Weekday Travel Times to NYC ………………………….. ……………………………………………………………. 32 Table 24. WBL Week day Travel Times to Waterbury ………………………………………………………………………………… 32 Table 25. Speed and Track Class Data for WBL ………………………….. …………………………………………………………… 33 Table 26. WBL Fares (2017) ………………………….. …………………………………………………………………………………. 34 Table 27. At Grade Public R oad Crossing s WB L ………………………….. ………………………………………………………….. 34 Table 28. Summer 2017 Averag e WB L I nbound R idership by Train………………………….. …………………………………… 35 Table 29. Summer 2017 Averag e WB L Outbound R idership by Train ………………………….. ………………………………… 35 Table 30. Waterbury B ranch Station I nbound R idership Summer 2017 ………………………….. ……………………………… 35 Table 31. Waterbury B ranch Station outbound riders hip s ummer 2017 …………………………………………………………. 35 Table 32. Corridor Commuter Bus Service ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………… 40 Table 33. Waterbury B ranch Line Parking Capacity and Utilization………………………….. …………………………………… 43 Table 34. Waterbury Parking Utilization ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………….. 44 Table 35. Waterbury Parking Costs ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………………… 44 Table 36. Naugatuck Parking Utilization ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 46 Table 37. Beacon Falls Parking Utilization ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………… 48 Table 38. Seymour Parking Utilization ………………………….. …………………………………………………………………….. 50 Table 39. Ansonia Parking Utilization ………………………….. ……………………………………………………………………… 52 Table 40. Derby Parking Utilization ………………………….. ………………………………………………………………………… 54 Table 41. Travel Patterns Within the Corridor ………………………………………………………………………………………… 58 Table 42. Top Municipality for Employment Outside the Study Corridor ………………………….. ……………………………. 58 Table 43. Work Location of People Who Li ve in the Study Corridor, 2014 ………………………….. ………………………….. 60 Table 44. Home L ocation of People Who Work i n the Study C orridor, 2014 ………………………….. ……………………….. 60 Table 45. Route 34 AADT …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 61 Table 46. Fixed R oute Travel time and Speeds ………………………….. …………………………………………………………… 66 Table 47. On -time Performance Summary Table ………………………….. ………………………………………………………… 66 APPENDI X A T ransportation I nfrastructure APPENDI X B Transit On -Time Performance Tables APPEND I X C Load Factor Graphs Exis tin g Co n d itio n s Page left blank intentionally Exis tin g Co n d itio n s i EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This Existing Conditions R eport is part of the broader R oute 8 Corridor Study 1 commissioned by the Naug atuck Valley Council of Governments (NVCOG). T his report examines current transportation services along the R oute 8 corridor, hig hlig hting existing transit and rail services, parking facilities, the existing road network and the a ssocia t ed travel patterns within the corridor. This information is the framework th at will be leveraged to help define broader system improvements and better position the corridor for alternative transit and rail service options to attract a g rowing customer ba se , which will be documented in 1 The Route 8 Study i s formal l y cal l ed the Route 8 & Waterbury Branch Li ne Corri dor Trans i t Ori ented Devel opment & Al ter na te Modes As s es s ment P r oj ec t. subsequent reports. The overall g oal of the R oute 8 Study is to identify and subsequently develop a cost effective means of p roviding enhanced transit and rail service along the R oute 8 corridor between Waterbury and B ridg eport. The study corridor is g enerally defined by the reg ion’ s transit network and a buffer of 500 feet along R oute 8 and the Waterbury B ranch Line between Wa t erbury and B ridg eport. Transit and Commuter Rail Services Transit Services Within the defined corridor there are three local bus syst em opera t ors, CTt ra nsit Waterbury, CTt ra nsit New Haven and Greater B ridg eport Transit. Collectively these three systems operate 12 routes which serve Waterbury B ranch Line (WB L) stations and intermediate communities. It is clear from the travel time data that routes which operate along R oute 8 have hig her operating speeds and that the number of st ops g rea t ly impacts the speed of a route. Commute time from Waterbury to New Haven is currently 23 minutes less time by bus than by train, but 25 minutes g reater on bus than rail between D erby and B ridg eport. I n Waterbury only two routes provide serv ice to the train station and both see very low ridership, particularly between the Waterbury Green and the train station. The routes serving Naug atuck are the two worst Buses provide over 6,000 passengers trips daily to WBL Train stations and Naugatuck Valley communities Rt. 8 Corridor Study Area Exis tin g Co n d itio n s ii performing in the Waterbury system; however recommendations have been made as part of t he Waterbury Area Transit Study (WATS) to improve service in Naug atuck. Long term recommendations identified in the study include: • The need for commuter bus service between Waterbury and the Shelton B usiness Park via R oute 8, with stops at the D erby and S eymour rail stations • I mproving the frequency and duration of service on routes that serve Naug atuck and the Waterbury Train Station. The syst em ha s a low spa re ra t io of buses , meaning that expansion of service would likely require acquisition of additional buses. When CTtransit Waterbury moved into their new maintenance and storag e facility in 2018, storag e of additional buses became feasible as the new facility can accommodate an expanded fleet. The two New Haven routes, which provide a more interregional style service, see strong and growing ridership fig ures and provide service from New Haven to several Naug atuck V alley communities . R idership data shows that the demand is towards New Haven during morning peak hours. R idership between Waterbury and New Haven is hig h enoug h to warrant using 60’ articulated buses . Additionally there is substantial demand along the 255 route to D erby, Ansonia and Seymour. Service expansion along t his corridor is currently not feasible due to funding short a g es. CTt ra nsit New Haven has been undertaking a study to develop and evaluate transit improvement s within the broader New Haven area . Greater B ridg eport Transit operates three routes which ser ve corridor communities. Unfortunately Greater B ridg eport Transit is suffering from funding reductions which has resulted in minor service cuts, as opposed to service increases as recommended in their recent Long R ang e Transit Plan. While funding for opera t ions ha s been cut, GB T has several capital improvements prog rammed using 5307 federal funding , which is federal money that cannot be used for operations. Under this prog ram the B ridg eport and Hartford syst ems will be t he first t ra nsit providers in t he st a te to operate fully electric buses . Commuter Rail Passeng er service on the branch line has a rich history dating back to 1849. Today 15 trains operate daily. The majority of the passeng ers are traveling to destinations outside of the reg ion. While ridershi p did decline between 2011 and 2016, daily ridership for 2017 is up 17% from the previous year with around 1, 014 daily riders. However service disruptions and infrequent service limit the systems’ usability. Additionally, the Waterbury B ranch Line is curre ntly not electrified, is not sig naliz ed, and has no passing siding s. Equipment is shared with the D anbury B ranch Line. While the WB L has several capital improvements underway, including Positive Train Control (PTC), signalization, g rade crossing and siding improvements, as well as planned use of real -time passeng er information on platform s, it is the equipment, particularly the locomotives used, that are the limiting factor in reducing service disruptions. Currently equipment failures have occurred 3 -5 time s a month, according to CTt ra nsit and Metro – North officials. When failures occur altern ative bussing is provided by CTt ra nsit New Haven. Efforts are ong oing to improve this performance. While signalizing and installing siding s on the line would allow for additional tra ins to operate on the branch line , the fleet size, condition of the equipment and ability to service and store additional equipment, would remain Waterbury to New Haven has the highest ridership amongst corridor routes Exis tin g Co n d itio n s iii limiting factor s in being able to improve reliability and expand service. Parking The corridor’s parking was inventoried to understand its utilization and availability. This included parking directly at rail stations and all parking within a half mile of each of the Waterbury B ranch Line stations. Approximately one -third of available parking is utiliz ed, indicating that there is an ample supply of parking around the stations. The highest station utilization rate was at the D erby/Shelton station; the hig hest downtown utiliz ation was in Ansonia; and B eacon Falls has the lowest utilization rate both at i ts station and throug hout its downtown area. R esults indicate that stations located closer to a community’ s downtown core or commercial areas have higher utilization. Parking at many of the stations has increased since last surveyed in 2001, which reflects the increase in ridership demonstrated by 2017 fig ures. Travel Patterns The travel pattern section assesses modes, travel time and journey to work data. These three metrics create a broad perspective on how and where people are traveling within and along the R oute 8 corridor. The modal split analysis demonstrates that individuals overwhelming ly commute alone. The corridor has a lower than averag e rate of individuals who commute on the public transit network when compared to the state average. For those who commute outside of their community for work , it should be noted that more individuals travel to New Haven than B ridg eport for work. The majority of individuals living in a WB L community who work in one of the communities along the main line would be requi red to transfer in B ridg eport if they used the train. Rt. 8 Corridor Mode Split for Commute to Work Existing Road Network The analysis of existing road conditions includes traffic volume and a travel time analysis. Average Daily Traffic (ADT) results demonstrate that traffic volume is greatest near Bridgeport and generally decreases the farther north on R oute 8 that you travel. However traffic volume spikes at key interchang es along the corridor, including the R oute 25 and R oute 15 interchang e z one, between exits 12 and 16, and at the interchang e with I -84. Each of these roadway seg ments report increased volume when compared to adjacent sect ions, likely leading to roadway cong estion and delays during peak commuting hours. NP RDM S Dat a – AM Peak Travel Speeds Exis tin g Co n d itio n s i Page left blank intentionally Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 1 1. IN TRODUCTION NVCOG has initiated the R oute 8 Corridor Study to identify wa ys t o reduce traffic cong estion and to develop an effective plan for providing enhanced rail and transit service in the R oute 8 corridor between Waterbury and B ridg eport. The purpose of this – Existing Conditions Report – is to identify current transportation services and infrastructure within the Study Corridor as well as present the results of an environmental survey. This alig ns with the g oals and objectives of the study whic h are presented in Fig ure 1. I nformation within this report will serve as a basis for the analysis of existing deficiencies and current and future needs affecting mobility within this corridor. Using the data summariz ed within this report, the Study Team will perform a corridor -level analysis that evaluates the potential benefits of rail/transit improvements that will address current and future demand in the Study Corridor. The study area for the Route 8 corridor includes several components including a 30- mile portion of the R oute 8 expresswa y , the Waterbury B ranch Line (WBL) and local roads connecting the pa sseng er stations to Route 8. The R oute 8 expressway within the study area is between I nte rchang e 30 in Waterbury and I nterchang e 2 in B ridg eport. The footprint of the area being studied includes 500 feet on either side of the WB L, R oute 8 and connecting roads , plus one-half mile around all stations on t he WB L. The study area is illustrated in Fig ure 2. Efficien tly an d effectiv ely move commuters through the Region and establish higher density residential development, economic redevelopment and natural resource management 1 Goals and Objectives Evaluate and assess traffic operations and safety along Route 8 between Waterbury and Bridgeport 2 Develop short -, mid – and long -term transit service plans 5 Link the Derby -Shelton and Bridgeport rail stations, as well as, existing, planned and proposed transit oriented and supportive districts and neighborhoods 4 Convert and transform the city -to wn center areas of Shelton, Derby, Ansonia, Seymour, Beacon Falls, Naugatuck and Waterbury from automobile depende nt uses to those supported by transit access and into spatially connected districts with safe and convenient pedestrian linkages and transit -supp o rtiv e d en s ities 6 Ad v an ce HUD’ s liv ab ility principles and extend sustainable communities 8 Determine the physical layout and right -of-way o f Ro u te 8, as well as the general land use at key interchange areas 3 Pu b lic tran s it co n n ectiv ity 9 Promote and identify TOD -supportive land use development plans and identify alternative transit modes that facilitate travel to and from TOD areas 7 Figure 1. Goals and Objectives Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 2 Figure 2. Existing Transit Services Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 3 2. EXISTING TRANSIT SER VICES This sect ion details the current transit services operating within the study corridor towns of Waterbury, Naug atuck, B eacon Falls, Seymour, Ansonia, D erby, Shelton, Orang e, Milford, Stratford, and B ridg eport. Connecting s ervice between Hartford, New Haven and the Study Corridor is also examined . This a ssessment includes local fixed bus routes, rail pa sseng er services, and connecting t ra nsport a t ion services. 2.1 Local Fixed Route Bus Transit There are three primary fixed route bus operators in the reg ion that include CTt ra nsit Waterbury and New Haven D ivision s, and Greater B ridg eport Transit Authority . Operating and fare information is presented for each provider and for each route in the study corridor. R oute information presented includes the service span, peak headw ay, towns and rail stations served, one -way travel time, and averag e daily ridership. For routes which operate in the corridor communities , ridership counts were taken on board during peak trips, as identified by the provider, on typical weekday service ty pes. 2.1.1 CTtransit Waterbury CTt ra nsit Waterbury contracts with North East Transportation (NET) to operate 22 local bus routes and six tripper 2 routes (operate during the peak hours only) in Waterbury and the surrounding communities (Fig ure 3). Service is provided seven days a week and g enerally operates from 6:00 AM to midnig ht on weekdays , 9:30 AM to midnight on Saturdays , and 9:30 AM to 5:00 PM on Sundays . 2 Tr i pper s ervice mea ns r egular ly s cheduled ma ss tr a nspor tation s ervi ce whi ch is open to the publ i c, and whi ch i s des i gned or modi fi ed to accommodate the needs of s chool s tudents and pers onnel, using various fare collecti ons or s ubsidy s ystems . (49 CFR 605.3) Figure 3. C T Transi t Wat e rbury Syst e m M ap Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 4 In 2015 the system carried 2,721,399 pa sseng ers, 11% of which are on routes that serve Naug atuck, B eacon Falls or the Waterbury Train Station . D uring pea k service 36 vehicles are in operation. Annual revenue miles are 1, 102,218 and hours are 92, 214. The passeng ers per revenue mile in 2015 was 2.5 and has been increasing since 2012 due to an overall increa se in pa sseng ers. Since 2012 Waterbury has implement ed several service chang es including the addition of late nig ht service and holiday service. The syst em opera t es using a pulse (a timed transfer between multiple routes) at or near the Waterbury Green in downtown Waterbury. There are multiple bus stops lo cated around and adjacent to the Waterbury Green on East and West Main Streets. Most routes pulse on the half hour or on the hour at the Waterbury Green. The rout es that are operated by CTt ra nsit Waterbury are presented in Table 1. The routes in bold either serve a rail station or one of the corridor communities and are displayed in Fig ure 4. Further analysis of these routes is presented on the next pag e . Figure 4. CT Transit Waterbury Corridor Routes Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 5 Rout e Service Span (Days of t he W eek/Hours per Weekday) Pe ak He adw ay (minutes) Towns Served Rail St at ions Served End to End Tr ave l Tim e (minutes) Average Daily Ride rship 411 Overlook 7/18 30 Waterbury —- 15 532 412 Hill St 7/18 30 Waterbury —- 15 282 413 Oakville 7/18 60 Waterbury, W a ter town —- 30 601 416 Buck s Hill /Nor th Ma i n St 7/18 30 Waterbury —- 30 846 418 L ong Hill Rd 7/18.5 30 Waterbury —- 15 284 421 Walnut St 7/18 60 Waterbury —- 15 268 422 Wolcott St 7/18 60 Waterbury —- 30 856 42 5 Hit chcock L ake 7/18 60 W a ter bur y, W ol c ott —- 30 527 426 Ea s t Ma i n St – Fairlawn/Meriline 5/12.5 60 Waterbury —- 60 592 428 Ea s t Ma i n St – Scott Rd 7/10 50 Waterbury —- 20 318 431 East M ountai n 5/12 60 Waterbury —- 15 58 432 Hop eville/Sylvan Ave 5/12 60 Waterbury —- 15 81 433 Hope ville /B aldwin St 7/18.5 30 Waterbury —- 15 649 436 Town Plot/ Congr es s Ave 7/18.5 30 Waterbury 15 363 441 Town Plot/ Highland Ave 7/18 60 Waterbury Waterbury 15 179 44 2 Chase Par kw ay 7/18 60 Waterbury, Middlebury Waterbury 12 -25 584 444 Bunke r Hill Ave 7/18 60 Waterbury —- 15 383 445 Watertown Ave 7/13 60 Waterbury, W a ter town —- 30 332 450X Torrington 5/14 90 Waterbury, Torrington, Thomas ton Waterbury 45 -70 —- 471 Naugat uck/Millville 5/7.5 80 N augat uck N augat uck 40 7 472 N augat uck/ N e w Have n Rd 5/7 80 N augat uck N augat uck 40 22 473 Naugatuck/Spring St 5/ 80 N augat uck —- 15 —- 479X Be acon Fa lls 5/9.5 2 t rips Waterbury, Beacon Falls —- 25 127 417 Thomas ton Ave 6/12 30 Waterbury, Waterville —- 15 -20 284 447X Watertown /Straits Turnpi ke 5/9.5 2 tr i ps Waterbury, W a ter town —- 20 26 446X Watertown Industrial Park 5/9.5 2 tr i ps Waterbury, W a ter town —- 20 42 470X N augat uck Industrial Park 5/9 3 t rips Waterbury, Naugatuck —- 30 83 460X Cheshire Industrial Par k 5/10.5 3.5 trips Waterbury, Ches hi re —- 25 69 Tabl e 1. Waterbury Bus Routes Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 6 Route 441 Route 441 is operated seven days a week with a 6 0- minute frequency from 5:45 AM to 12:17 AM on weekdays and Saturday and 9:30 AM to 5:00 PM on Sundays . Performance Statistics for th is route are found in Table 2. On averag e the route underperforms compared to the other Waterbury rout es. Route 441 travels from the Waterbury Green to Town Plot via Hig hland Avenue. Service is provided t o the Waterbury Train Station at the intersection of Freigh t Street and Meadow Street. I t travels throug h a mix of residential and commercial land uses. The WATS recommended reducing the headway on this route to 80 minutes from 60 minutes . Fig ure 5 presents a map of the route, which travels the same path in both the outbound and inbound directions. This route does not experience vehicle traffic along the alig nment . Figure 5. Route 441 M ap A boarding s by trip chart is shown in Fig ure 6. R idership is hig hest in both directions during the morning commute. I nbound (towards Waterbury) ridership drops off duri ng the mid- day and peaks ag ain in the afternoon commute, while the outbound ridership is sporadic throug hout the day. Figure 6. Route 441 Boardings by Trip A sample PM peak -hour outbound and inbound run of the 441 was analysed to show rider activity (Fig ure 7 3). B oarding s and alig hting s (the sum of which is referred to a s activity by st op ) were highest at the Waterbury Green , but occurred sporadically throug hout the entire route with the majority of alig hting s occurring in the outbound direction and boarding s on the inbound trip. Figure 7. Route 441 activity by st op Route 442 Route 442 is operated seven days a week with a 60 – minute frequency from 6:30 A M to 12:17 PM on weekdays and Saturday and 9:30 AM to 5:00 PM on Sundays . Performance s tatistics for the route are found in 3 Load F actor is the capa city or utilization of a v ehicle/route , full g raphs can be found in Appendix C Tabl e 2. Route 441 Performance Statistics Metric Route Value Rank Passengers/hour 26.8 19/30 Passengers/Mile 2.16 18/30 Passengers/Trip 7.17 25/30 Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 7 Table 3. On average this route carries more passengers per trip and hour than most Waterbury r outes. Route 442 travels from the Waterbury Green to Middlebury via R oute 64. Service is provided for the Waterbury Train Station at the intersection of Freig ht Street and Meadow Street on weekends and evening trips on inbound trips. I t travels throug h a mix of residential and commercial land uses. The WATS study recommended truncating this route at the H arold Leever Regional Cancer Center. Fig ure 8 presents a map of the route, which travels the same path in both the outbound and inbound directions during the day but o n nig hts and weekends serves Hig hland Avenue. This route does not experience vehicle traffic along the alignment . Figure 8. Route 442 M ap A boarding s by trip chart is shown in Fig ure 9. R idership is hig hest in the inbound direction at 11:00 AM and at 7:00 AM heading outbound. Overall ridership is greater in the AM heading outbound, but in the PM is relatively even in both directions. Figure 9. Route 442 Boardings by Trip Activity by stop was examined for a PM peak trip, a s t his is when the route serves the Waterbury Train Station ( Fig ure 10). B oarding s were hig hest at the Waterbury Green, and alig hting s were hig hest at Naug atuck Valley Community College. Overall the route had very little ridership in the evening as compared to the AM peak , which can have as many as an addit iona l 40 pa sseng ers per trip. Figure 10. Route 442 activity by st op Route 470X Route 470X is a tripper route and operates on weekdays only with two trips in the morning and one in the afternoon. Th is route does not serv e a train station but does service the Naugatuck Green a distance of 1,200 feet to the station. Performance s tatistics for th is route are found in Table 4. This route performs above average on the number of passeng ers per trip but below on the number of passeng ers per mile and hour. This indicates that the route is long and most passeng ers are traveling long er distances. Tabl e 3. Route 442 Performance Statistics Metric Route Value Rank Passengers/hour 73.41 2/30 Passengers/Mile 4.78 11/30 Passengers/Trip 16.17 7/30 Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 8 Route 470X travels from Waterbury to Naug atuck throug h commercial , residential and industrial land uses. Fig ure 11 presents a map of the route, which travels the same path in both the outbound and inbound directions. This route does not experience traffic cong estion during the AM peak but does between the Waterbury Green and Washing ton Street during the PM. The only issue exist s a t the Church Street opposite D ivision Street stop. At this location the stop is located just north of the Naug atuck Town Clerk Parking Lot, and the bus blocks the driveway ( Fig ure 12). This is of particular concern as it is a layover location and the bus can be waiting there for up to 2 minutes Figure 11. Route 470X M ap Figure 12. Map of Division Street/Church Street Bus Stop Issue A boarding s by trip chart is shown in Fig ure 13. R idership is g reater on the outbound trips towards Naug atuck than inbound towards Waterbury. The busiest trip is the 6:30 trip departing the Waterbury Green. Figure 13. Route 470X Boardings by Trip Activity by stop was examined for both an AM and a PM peak trip (Fig ure 14 and Fig ure 15). Overall ridership during each peak was relatively similar. Ridership loads peaked outbound between the Waterbury Green and Great Hill Road. Loads then beg in to drop until the Naug atuck Green a s pa sseng ers disemba rk. For t he inbound trip the ridership loads climb steadily with boarding s along Great Hill R oad. This indicates that there is demand between Waterbury and Naug atuck ; t his Metric Route Value Rank Passengers/hour 27.67 21 /30 Passengers/Mile 1.76 21 /30 Passengers/Trip 13.83 11 /30 Tabl e 4. Route 470X Performance Statistics Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 9 service was recommended in the WATS . The largest number o f boarding s was at the Waterbury Green and alig hting s was at the Naug atuck Green. Figure 14 . Route 470X AM activity by st op Figure 15. Route 470X P M activity by st op Route 479X Route 479X is a tripper route and operates on weekdays only with two round trips daily. The first trip leaves Waterbury at 6:30 A M and the second at 3:00 PM. Performance s tatistics for the route are found in Table 5. On averag e this route carries more passeng ers per trip an hour tha n most Waterbury r outes. Th is route travels from Waterbury to Pine R idg e R oad, an industrial area in Beacon Falls , servicing the Murtha I ndustrial Park along the way. Th is route does not service any of the train stations but does pass by the B eacon Falls Station . The 479X travels to predominantly industrial areas carrying workers to jobs . Fig ure 16 presents a map of the route , which travels the same path in both the outbound and inbound directions , but if a second over flow bus is required it heads directly to Pine R idg e R oad via R oute 8. This route does not experience vehicle traffic along the alig nment . Figure 16. Route 479X M ap A boarding s by trip chart is shown in Fig ure 17. R idership is headed away from Waterbury in the morning and towards Waterbury in the afternoon. Metric Route Value Rank Passengers/hour 63.5 5/30 Passengers/Mile 2.35 20/30 Passengers/Trip 31.75 2/30 Tabl e 5. Route 479X Performance Statistics Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 10 Figure 17. Route 479X Boardings by Trip Activity by stop was examined for both an AM and a PM peak trip (Fig ure 18 and Fig ure 19). Overall ridership trends show passeng ers heading outbound in the morning and inbound in the afternoon. Nej I nc. at Pines R idg e R oad had the g reatest number of boarding s and alig hting s outside of Waterbury. R idership on the morning trip was hig h enoug h to warrant an additional vehicle. Figure 18 . Route 479X AM activity by st op Figure 19. Route 479X P M activity by st op Routes 471/473 Routes 471/473 operate on weekdays only with an 80 – minute frequency from 9:20 A M to 4:38 PM. This rout e is interlined with the 472 and provides local service in Naug atuck. Performance s tatistics for the route are found in Table 6. This route is one of the bottom performers and needs to be reconfig ured. The 471 beg ins in downtown Naug atuck and heads north to Oronoke R oad and then heads south back to downtown Naug atuck and R ubber Avenue. Th is route circulates in the counterclockwise direction serving Oak Terrace, Field Street and Hoadley Street. The WATS recommendations included reconfig uring R outes 471, 472 and 473 to provide all day service between Waterbury and Naug atuck. Fig ure 20 presents a map of the route. Service to the Waterbury train station is provided with a stop at th e corner of Maple Street and Water Street a distance of 750 feet to the station. The route travels throug h lig ht residential and commercial areas and does not experience vehicle traffic along the alignment . Figure 20. Routes 471/4 72/473 M ap A boarding s by trip chart is shown in Fig ure 21. R idership is g reatest on the 9:20 AM and 2:40 PM trips and lowest on the 10:40 AM and 4:00 PM trips. This indicates trips are most likely not for work purposes. Tabl e 6. Routes 471/473 Performance Statistics Metric Route Value Rank Passengers/hour 3.47 29/30 Passengers/Mile 0.52 29/30 Passengers/Trip 4.33 29/30 Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 11 Figure 21. Route s 471/473 Boardings by Trip Activity by stop was examined for an AM trip (Fig ure 22). B oard ing s occurred throug hout the route with the majority of passeng ers alig hting at the Mount View Shop Plaza. Three passeng ers did stay on to continue onto the 472 route west of the Naug a tuck R iver. Figure 22. Routes 471/473 activity by st op Route 472 Route 472 operates on weekdays only with an 80 -minute frequency from 10:00 AM to 5:10 PM. This rout e is interlined with the 471/473 and provides local service in Naug atuck. Performance s tatistics for the route are found in Table 7. This route is the worst performer in the Wa t erbury syst em. Route 472 travels from the Naug atuck Green to B owman Drive on the west side of the river. I t travels throug h rural areas with interspersed commercial developments. The WATS recommendations included reconfig uring R outes 471, 472 and 473 to provide all day service between Waterbury and Naug atuck. Fig ure 20 presents a map of th is route, which travels the same path in both the outbound and inbound directions. This route does not experience traffic cong estion . A boarding s by trip chart is shown in Fig ure 23. R idership is g reatest in the morning and then drops significantly later in the day. All trips after 11:20 AM had two passeng ers or less, the 3:20 PM trip had no passeng ers . Figure 23. Route 472 Boardings by Trip Activity by stop was examined for an AM trip (Fig ure 24). There were three passengers , which were a carryover from the R oute s 471/473 interline; the route had no boarding s and only one alig hting occurred west of the Naug atuck R iver . Figure 24. Route 472 activity by st op Funding Funding sources for CTt ra nsit Waterbury include local and state prog rams for operating assistance funds , a s well a s Metric Route Value Rank Passengers/hour 3.73 30/30 Passengers/Mile 0.56 30/30 Passengers/Trip 3.50 30/30 Tabl e 7. Route 472 Performance Statistics Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 12 capital funding available throug h the state and federal g overnments. Local funding is from municipal g rant programs . State funding is provided by the Connecticut D epartment of Transportation (CTD OT) throug h state contract assistance and formula funds. All state funding for transit in Connecticut comes from the Special Transportation Fund; which funds all transportation systems in the state except th e B radley I nternational Airport . R evenue is g enerated throug h fees and the g as tax but at the moment is not fully dedicated to the Special Transport ation Fund; portions g o into the g eneral fund. Farebox revenue is collected from cash fares and pas s sales and accounts for 22. 8% of revenue needed to operate the fixed route service; this is slightly less than the national averag e for urban systems operating fixed route service of 25.7% 4. Other reven ue includes advertising revenue , municipal g rant prog rams, and ot hers. CTt ra nsit Waterbury’ s operating budg et covers three areas of expense: fixed route b us, demand response and administration. Figure 25. FY2105 C Tt ransi t Waterbury Funding CTt ra nsit Waterbury offers a wide rang e of fares and pa sses (Table 8). The base fare is $1.75 with free transfers and half fares ($0. 85) offered to seniors 65 years of age and older and individuals with disabilities. A reduced fare of $1.40 is offered for youth ag es 5 – to 18 and free fares are offered to children 4 years of ag e and young er when accompanied by an adult. CTt ra nsit offers a variety of sh ort -t erm pa sses which are valid for calendar days only, beg inning at the time the pass is purchased. Pa sses ca n be purchased online, throug h the mail, the NET office at 1717 Thomaston Avenue, Waterbury and at The Travel Center in downtown Waterbury. CTt ra n sit offers the U – Pass to all CT community and state colleg e students. The 4 From the National Transit Database 2015 National Transit Summary and Trends pass allows students to ride all bus and intrastate commuter rail for free. The prog ram is funded throug h a $20 semester fee paid by all students regardless of utiliz ation of the pro gram. S in g le Fare Price Adult $1.7 5 Youth (5 -18) $1.40 Child (under 5) Free Tra nsfer Free Passes 10 -Ride Ticket $15.75 1-day $3.50 3-day $8.75 5-day $14.00 7-day $19.25 31 -day $63.00 Tabl e 8. C Tt ransi t Fare s CTt ra nsit is in the process of upg rading the fare system with contactless smartcard technolog y and fare capping . Fa re capping g uarantees that an individual will not pay more than the lowest fare for any g iven period of time. To eliminate barriers to bankless popula tion g roups, individuals will be able to load dollar amounts onto the card at ticket vending kiosks and at certain retail net works. The new technolog y has be en deployed system wide with a mobile application anticipated in the near future . With the smartcar d release there will also be an increase in the different types of pass options available including reduced multi -day you th a nd senior pa sses. Fleet As of March 2017, the CTt ra nsit Waterbury fleet consisted of 40 fixed route vehicles , comprising primarily 35- to 40 – foot buses , all of which were manufactured in 2004 or lat er (Table 9). D uring peak periods 36 vehicles are needed , leaving a ten percent spare ratio. S eventeen of the buses are hybrid diesel -electric . I n addition, all vehicles are wheelchair accessible in accordance with requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) . D uring snow and ice events chains are put on the tires of all buses to help with traction because of the hilly nature of Waterbury. Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 13 Waterbury Transit Key Findings for the Corridor • Two routes (441 and 442) serve the Waterbury Train Station. • Routes 471/472 serve the Naug atuck Train Station. • There is very little ridership between the Waterbury Green and Train Station. • There are location issues with the D ivision Street/Church Street bus stop in Naug atuck ; it blocks the Town Hall D riveway and is in the middle of a T inte rsect ion. • R idership is hig her on the west side of the river in Naug atuck. • There is larg e demand from Waterbury to Nej I nc. in B eacon Falls. • There has been a l ack of consist ent funding for service improvements. • A low spa re vehicle ratio indicates that expanding service would require additional vehicles. The oldest buses in the fleet, with the most miles, are the 40’ New Flyer D40LF , heavy duty buses and are past their useful life of 12 y ears but not useful mileag e of 5 00,000. O verall the fleet is in g ood condition with many of the older vehicles schedule d to be replaced over the next couple of years . Y e ar Make Mode l L engt h Capacit y Count 2004 N e w F l y er D40LF 40 63 5 2008 StarTrans Sena tor 25 27 1 2010 N e w F l y er XDE3 5 35 63 17 2010 N e w F l y er XD35 35 63 17 Tabl e 9. C Tt ransi t Waterbury Fleet Summary Condi ti on Y e ar M ake Model V e h i cle Count Fai r Good Excellent 2004 New Fl yer D40LF 40 X 2008 StarTrans Sena tor 25 X 2010 New Fl yer XDE3 5 35 X 2010 New Fl yer XD35 35 X Tabl e 10. C Tt ransi t Waterbury Fleet Condition 2 .1.2 CTtransit New Haven CTt ra nsit New Haven contracts with HNS Management to operate 21 local bus routes and two commuter shuttles in New Haven and the surrounding communities. Service is provided seven days a week and g enerally operates from 5 :00 AM to 1:00 AM on weekdays and Saturdays , and 6 : 00 AM to midnig ht on Sundays. In 2014 the system carried 9,526,684 pa sseng ers. D uring peak service 97 vehicles a re in operation. Annual revenue miles are 3,688,395 and hours are 333,660. The passenger per revenue mile is 2.6 . The syst em opera t es using a ra dia l syst em wit h most routes beg inning and ending at the g reen in downtown New Haven , traveling outward from the city center on major roadways . Several routes are interlined at the g reen to provide crosstown connections and reduce running times but eliminating the need to turn around. S everal of the routes operate along a main corridor and then branch out in outlying areas creating several deviations. The routes , which are opera ted by CTt ra nsit New Haven are presented in Table 11. The routes in bold either serv e a rail station or one of the corridor communities and are displayed in Fig ure 27. Further analysis of these routes is presented below . There are an additional 19 routes not presented below which operate in New Haven . Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 14 Figu re 26. C Tt ransi t New Haven System Map Rout e Service Span (Days of t he Week/Hours per Weekday) Pe ak He adw ay (minutes) Towns Served Rail St at ions Served End to End Tr ave l Tim e (minutes) Average Daily Ride rship 229 W at e rbury /Whitney Ave 7/16 30 New Haven, Hamden, Cheshire, Waterbury New Haven 73 2139 (J) 255 Ansonia -Seymour 6/15.5 30 New Haven, West Have n, Or ange , Shelton, Derby, Ansonia, Seymour De rby – Shelton, Ansonia, Seymour 58 1876 (FW) Tabl e 11. New Haven Bus Routes in Study Corrido r Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 15 Figure 27. C Tt ransi t New Haven Corridor Routes Route 255 Route 255 is operated Monday throug h Saturday . The re is no Sunday service but CTt ra nsit New Haven ha s received requests to provide it. There are 16 round trips daily to Seymour with a 30 -minute headway during the peak and 60- minute in the off -peak on weekdays . The Saturday frequency is 60 minutes. Perform ance Statistics for the route are found in Table 12. R oute 255 performs above averag e with the number of passeng er per trip and the max load but below the system avera g e for passeng ers/hour and mile. This indicates that passeng ers are traveling long er distances. Route 255 has two deviations plus one express route. Route 255 serves D erby/Shelton, Ansonia and Seymour , and the express route, which has limited direct service between New Haven and Seymour ( Fig ure 28). I n D erby the route stops at the train station and downtown along Elizabeth Street. I n Shelton the route serv es H owe Ave nue between the Route 8 Bridge and Bridge Street . Th is route does not pull into the train station in Ansonia but serves it from Main Street, with the nearest stop a walking distance of 400 feet from the platform. I n Seymour the route stops at the train station and serves downtown along Main Street. I t travels throug h a mix of built up residential and commercial land uses as well as open /rural areas. This route experience s traffic cong estion on R oute 34 heading tow ards D erby. Figure 28. Route 255 M ap The first non- express trip from Seymour is at 5:30 AM and the last return trip is 6:25 PM ; the 7:30 PM trip only g oes as far as Ansonia. There are 18 trips to New Haven and 16 to Waterbury daily, with a 30- minute headway during the peak and a 60-minute headway in the off -peak. Performance statistics for the route are found in Table 12. A boarding s by trip chart is shown in Fig ure 33. R idership to New Haven is hig her in the morning and mid-day, similar in the afternoon , and hig her to Seymour in the off – peak . R idership is hig hest during the mid- day in both directions . Metric Route V al ue Rank Passengers/hour 42.8 13/21 Passengers/Mile 2 .7 15/21 Passengers/Trip 22. 88 7/21 Ave r age Max L oad 14 8/21 Tabl e 12. Route 255 Performance Statistics Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 16 Figure 29. Route 255 Boardings by Trip Activity by stop was examined for an peak trip in both the outbound and inbound directions (Fig ure 30 and Fig ure 31). B oarding s and alig hting s were hig hest at the New Haven Gr een, but occurred sporadically throug hout the entire rou te with the majority of alig hting s occurring in the outbound and boarding on the inbound. B oarding s in the outbound occurred along Eliz abeth Street in D erby. Alig hting s in the inbound occurred in downtown Shelton. Figure 30. Route 255 activity by st op Outbound Figure 31. Route 255 activity by st op In bound Route 229 Route 229 is operated Monday throug h S unday. There are 18 round trips daily with a 30 -minute headway during the peak and a 60- minute headway in the off -peak on weekdays . Saturday frequency is 60 minutes . Performance s tatistics for the route are found in Table 13. R oute 229 performs above averag e with the number of pa sseng er s per trip and the max load but below the system averag e for passeng ers/hour and mile. This indicates that t he trips carry many pa sseng ers but a re long and many passeng ers are traveling long er distances. Route 229 has five deviation s and travels from Union Station in New Haven to Waterbury via Cheshire and Hamden. I n Waterbury the route stops at the Waterbury Green at the corner of West Main and Leavenworth. The first trip to Waterbury is at 5:15 AM and the last return trip is 8:05 PM. I t travels throug h a mix of built up residential and commercial land uses as well as rural areas . Fig ure 32 presents a map of the route, which travels the same path in both the outbound and inbound directions. This route does not experience vehicle traffic cong estion . Tabl e 13. J Whitney Avenue Performance Statistics Metric Route Value Rank Passengers/hour 34.9 16/21 Passengers/Mile 1.9 19/21 Passengers/Trip 22.23 8/21 Ave r age Max L oad 13 9/21 Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 17 Figure 32. Route 229 M ap A boarding s by trip chart is shown in Fig ure 33. R idership to New Haven is hig her in the morning and mid- day, similar in the off -peak and hig he r to Waterbury in the afternoon. R idership is hig hest in the inbound in the morning and in the mid- day in the outbound. Figure 33. Route 229 Boardings by Trip Activity by stop was examined for an AM peak trip in both the outbound and inbound directions (Fig ure 34 and Fig ure 35). The m ajority of alig hting s occurr ed in the outbound trip and boarding s on the inbound trip. I n the outbound direction, the New Haven Green had the hig hest number of boarding s with alig hting s sporadically between the Green and Whitney Ave/D ay Spring Ave . The gre atest concentration of a lig hting s in the outbound direction was in Waterbury. There was very little pa sseng er activity between Whitney Ave/D ay Spring Ave in Hamden and Waterbury downtown. I n the inbound direction, boarding s were hig hest in downtown Waterbury and alig hting s at the G reen in New Haven. Figure 34. Route 229 activity by st op Outbound Figure 35. Route 229 activity by st op In bound Funding Funding sources for CTt ra nsit New Haven include farebox revenues, state programs for operating a ssist a nce funds, as well as capital funding available throug h the state and federal governments. State funding is provided by CTD OT Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 18 throug h state contract assistance and formula funds . F arebox revenue is collected from cash fares and pass sa les and accounts for 2 0.7% of revenue needed to operate the fixed route service. This is below the national average for urban systems operating fixed route service with a 25.7% fare box recovery ratio. Figure 36. FY2105 C Tt ransi t New Haven Funding CTt ra nsit New Haven offers a wide rang e of fares and pa sses ( Table 8). The base fare is $1.75 with free transfers and half fares ($0. 85) are offered to seniors 65 yea r s of ag e and older and individuals with disabilities. A reduced fare of $1. 40 are offered for youth ages 5 to 18 and free fares are offered to children 4 years of ag e and young er when acc ompanied by an adult. CTt ra nsit offers a variety of short -t erm pa sses, which are valid for calendar days only, beg inning at the time the pass is purchased. Pa sses can be purchased online, throug h the mail, and at the CTt ra nsit Customer Service and Sales Outlet on the New Haven Green. As with the CTt ra nsit Waterbury Division , the New Haven D ivision will be upgrading its fare technolog y and passes as well. Fleet As of 2015, CTt ra nsit New Haven fleet consisted of 1 34 fixed route vehicles consisting primarily of 40- to 60- foot buses , all of which were manufactured in 20 01 or later ( Table 14). Nine of the buses are hybrid diesel -electric. I n addition, all vehicles are wheelchair accessible in accordance with requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) . The o ldest buses in the fleet, with the most miles, were the 40’ New Flyer D40LF , heavy duty buses and are past their useful life of 12 years but not useful mileage of 500,000. Y e ar Make Mode l L e n gth Capacit y Count 2001 New Fl yer DL4 0 40 38 12 2003 New Fl yer DL4 0 40 38 44 2004 New Fl yer DL4 0 40 38 42 2010 New Fl yer XDE4 0 40 38 14 2010 NO VA LFS Ar Ti c 60 57 12 2012 New Fl yer XDE3 5 35 30 1 2014 NO VA LFS ArTi c 60 57 4 2014 New Fl yer XDE4 0 40 38 5 Tabl e 14. C Tt ransi t New Haven Fleet Summary Condi ti on Y e ar Make Mode l Vehicle Count Poor Fair Good 2001 New Fl yer DL4 0 12 4 8 0 2003 New Fl yer DL4 0 44 0 44 0 2004 New Fl yer DL4 0 42 0 42 42 2010 New Fl yer XDE4 0 14 0 0 14 2010 NO VA LFSArTi c 12 0 0 12 2012 New Fl yer XDE3 5 1 0 0 1 2014 NO VA LFS ArTic 4 0 0 4 2014 New Fl yer XDE4 0 5 0 0 5 Tabl e 15. C Tt ransi t New Haven Fleet Condition Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 19 New Haven Transit Key Findings for the Corridor • D uring the morning peak travel times ridership is g reater on inbound transit buses heading towards New Haven. • On R oute 255 there is demand for travel between Seymour, Ansonia and D erby. • R idership is hig hest during the mid- day peak. • R idership between Waterbury and New Haven is hig h requiring 60’ articulated vehicles. • Shelton does not allow CTtransit New Haven to stop in downtown due to pa rking issues. • I f funding were available service on the 255 route would be increased. • R idership on R oute 229 has been incr ea sing . • There is no service on Sundays on R oute 255 but there is demand. • CTtransit New Haven provides bus service along the WB L when the trains a re out of service. This occurs 3 -4 t imes a month and requires them to keep four vehicles in conting ent. 2.1.3 Greater Bridgeport Transit Greater Bridgeport Transit Authority (GBT) operates 17 local bus routes, two express routes, and the interreg ional Coastal Link in B ridg eport and surrounding communities. Service is provided seven days a week and generally opera tes 5:30 AM to 11:30 PM on weekdays , 5:00 AM to 11:30 PM on Saturdays, and 8:00 AM to 8:00 PM on Sundays In 2014 the system carried 6,082,763 pa sseng ers. D uring peak service 43 vehicles are in operation. Annual revenue miles are 2,111,594 and hours are 171,834. The passengers per revenue mile is 2.9 and has been steadily increasing since 2011 due to an overall increase in pa sseng ers. The syst em is a radial system with most routes beg inning and ending at the B ridg eport Transportation Terminal using a pulse o n the hour and the half hour , which allows for transfers. The bus terminal has 17 bus bays, a 3, 000 square foot in -door waiting area, heated shelters on the platform, and real time information sig ns. Real -time schedule information is available on -line thro ug h their bus tracker. The routes that serve one of the corridor communities are hig hlig hted in Table 16 and displayed in Fig ure 38. Further analysis of these routes is presented below. Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 20 Figure 37. Greater Bridgeport Transit System Map Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 21 Route Service Span (Days of t he W eek/Hours per Weekday) Pe ak He adw ay (minutes) Towns Served Rail St at ions Served End to End Tr ave l Tim e (minutes) Average Daily Ride rship Route 1 – Dock Shopping Center Vi a Ba r num Ave. 7/18 30 Bridgeport, Stratford Bri dgeport 47 2730 Coa s tal l ink 7/17.5 20 Fairfield, Bridgeport, Str a tfor d, Milford, Norwal k, Wes tport Fairfield, Bri dgeport, Str a tfor d, Milford 113 3215 Route 3 – Wes tfi eld Trumbull Ma l l vi a Madison Ave 7/17.25 30 Trumbul l , Bri dgeport , Fairfield Bri dgeport 39 937 Route 4 – Wes tfi eld Trumbull Ma l l vi a Park Ave 7/16.5 30 Trumbul l , Bri dgeport, Fairfield Bri dgeport 25 1384 Route 5 – Bl a ck Rock via Fa i rfield Ave 7/17.75 30 Bri dgeport Bri dgeport 48 (round tr i p) 1531 Route 6 – Wes tfi eld Trumbull Ma l l vi a Trumbull Ave 7/17.75 30 Trumbul l , Bri dgeport Bri dgeport 36 1156 Route 7 – Ca rolton Hospital vi a Commer ce Dr ive 5/9 3 tri ps /day Bridgeport, Fairfield Bri dgeport 25 96 Route 8 – Wes tfi eld Trumbull Ma l l vi a Main St. 7/17.5 20 Trumbul l , Bri dgeport Bri dgeport 30 3278 Route 9 – Ha wl ey La ne vi a Ea s t Ma i n St. 7/16.75 30 Bri dgeport, Trumbul l Bri dgeport 36 2431 Route 10 – Mai n St. and Barnum Ave. (Stratford) via Hol l ister Ave. 7/16.75 30 Bridgeport, Stratford , Fairfield Bri dgeport 25 1953 Route 13 – Suc c es s Par k via Cen tr a l Ave 7/17 30 Bri dgeport Bri dgeport 30 1367 Route 14 – Monroe Goodwill – Wes tfi eld Trumbull Mall 5/6.5 4 tri ps /day Trumbul l , Monroe — 17 113 Route 15 – Hawle y Lane/Shelton/Derby 7/15.75 60 Bridgeport, Stratford, Trumbull, Shelton, De rby Bridgeport, De rby 54 1071 Route 16 – Ha wl ey La ne to South Str a tfor d vi a Dock Shoppi ng Center 5/8 60 Stratford, Trumbul l Str a tfor d 25 N/A Route 17 – Suc c es s Par k via North Ave. & Bos ton Ave. 6/13 30 Bri dgeport Bri dgeport 36 1339 Route 19X – Ex pr es s Mon ro e Goodwi ll vi a Route 25 5/12 5 tri ps /day Monroe, Trumbul l , Bri dgeport Bri dgeport 28 36 Route 20 – W es tfi el d Tr umble Ma l l – Upper Stepney 5/10.25 4 tri ps /day Stratford, Trumbul l ___ 21 52 Route 22X – Downtown Shelton via Route 8 5/11.75 3.5 Trips/day Bridgeport, Trumbull, She lt on Bridgeport 37 N/A Route 23 – She lt on via Rt . 110 5/13.5 60 Derby, Shelton, Stratford, Bridgeport De r by, Stratford, Bridgeport 45 393 Tabl e 16. Greater Bridgeport Transit Bus Routes Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 22 Figure 38. GBT Corridor Routes Route 15 R oute 15 operates seven days a week with 60 -minute frequencies from 6:50 AM to 9:57 PM. Performance s tatistics for the route are found in Table 17. The route ranks towards the middle for performance s tatistics. R oute 15 travels from B ridg eport to D erby and serves the B ridg eport R ail Station, B ridg eport Avenue and the D erby – Shelton Station via B ridg eport Avenue. I t travels throug h hig hly developed areas in the town and city centers as well as suburban areas in -between . This route wa s recommended to be converted to limited stop between the Hawley Lane Mall and D erby -Shelton Station as part of the one – to three -year recommendations in the GB T Transit Master Plan . Fig ure 39 presents a map of the route, which travels the same path in both the outbound and inbound directions. This route does experience frequent traffic cong est io n going over the Derby -Shelt on B ridg e and in d owntown Shelton. Figure 39. GBT Route 15 Map A boarding s by trip chart is shown in Fig ure 40. R idership is hig hest in the inbound (towards B ridg eport) direction during the even hour trips. This sug g ests individuals travel to B ridg eport for employment. Outbound ridership drops off during the mid- day and peaks ag ain in the afternoon commute. R idershi p is g reatest on the 10:50 AM trip. Tabl e 17. Route 15 Performance Statistics Metric Route Value Rank Passengers/H our 33.83 9/20 Passengers/Mile 2.02 10/20 Passengers/Trip 30.7 6/20 8 Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 23 Figure 40. Route 15 Boardings by Trip Activity by stop was examined for an AM peak trip (Fig ure 41). For the outbound trip, boarding s were hig hest at the B ridg eport Transportation Center ( BTC) with the largest g roup of passeng ers alig hting between the Hawley Lane Mall and Walmart , a heavily commercialized corridor . For the inbound trip boarding s were hig hest between the D erby- Shelton Station and Oak Avenue in Shelt on . The larg est number of boarding s and alig hting s was at the BTC . Figure 41. Route 15 activity by st op Route 22x R oute 22X is a commuter route and operates on weekdays only with three trips in the morning and three in the afternoon. The route provides service from downtown B ridg eport to the Shelton B usiness Park via R oute 8, circulating clockwise throug h the business park. As part of the GB T Tra nsit Ma st er Pla n t his ro ute was recommended to have improved frequencies as part of the three – to ten -year recommendations. Fig ure 39 presents a map of the route, which travels the same path in both the outbound and inbound directions. This route does experience traffic along R oute 8 at the Route 15 exit. Figure 42. GBT Route 22x Map Activity by stop was examined for an AM peak trip (Fig ure 41). B oarding s were hig hest at the B ridg eport Transportation Center, w ith passeng ers primarily alighting at stops within the Shelton B usiness Park. The largest number of alig hting s was at the Research Drive/Prog ress Dr ive st op . Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 24 Figure 43. Route 22x activity by st op Route 23 Route 23 operates seven days a week with approximately 60- minute frequencies during the peak periods, there is no mid -day service between 9 :00 AM and 1:30 PM . Performance Statistics for the route ar e found in Table 18. The route performs worse than averag e compared to other GB T routes R oute 23 travels from B ridg eport to D erby and serves the B ridg eport Train Station, Stratford Train Station, and the D erby- Shelt on Station via Route 110. I t travels throug h developed commercial areas and residential areas . As part of the GBT Transit Master Plan , this route wa s recommended to be terminated at the potential B arnum Station as part of the three – to ten -year recommendations. Fig ure 44 presents a map of the route, which travels the same path in both the outbound and inbound directions. This route does experience traffic cong estion a s it pa sses throug h B ridg eport residential neig hborhoods due to the multiple stops sig ns and s ignals, as well as in Stratford along Main Street at the Route 15 Exit 53 ramps. Figure 44. GBT Route 23 Map A boarding s by trip chart is shown in Fig ure 45. R idership is hig hest in the o utbound direction (towards D erby) during the PM peak hour of 7 :00 PM. D uring the AM peak period, ridership is hig hest between 7:00 AM and 8:00 AM . Outbound ridership drops off during the mid- day and pea ks ag ain in the afternoon commute. R idership is greatest on the 6:00 PM trip . Figure 45. Route 23 Boardings by Trip Activity by stop was examined for a PM peak trip (Fig ure 46). B oarding s and alig hting s were highest at the BTC , but Tabl e 18. Route 23 Performance Statistics Metric Route Value Rank Passengers/Hour 20.84 15/20 Passengers/Mile 0.80 15/20 Passengers/Trip 13.2 14/20 Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 25 occurred sporadically throug hout the entire route in both the inbound and outbound directions . Figure 46. Route 2 3 activity by st op The greatest ch allenge the GBT has with servicing the rail stations (B ridg eport, Milford, Stratford, Fairfield and D erby) is the frequency of service ; most routes operate on 20-, 30- and 60 -minute headways . Creating and maintaining connections with Metro North t ra ins is challeng ing as their schedules chang e sea sona lly depending on roadway and rail projects, demand, and other factors . Funding The 2015 GB T annual operating budg et was $23. 2 million. Funding sources for GBT include local and state programs for oper ating a ssist a nce funds, as well as capital funding available throug h the state and federal g overnments. Local funding from the municipalities is roug hly $129, 000. The contribution levels were set in the 1990s a s t he loca l match for FTA operating funds, and has not increased since. State funding is provided by CTD OT throug h state contract assistance and formula g rants. Farebox revenue is collected from cash fares a nd pa ss sa les and accounts for 32% of revenue needed to operate the fixed route service . The GBT operating budg e t covers three areas of expense: fixed route bus , complementary AD A paratransit service, and administration. Figure 47. FY2105 GBT Funding GB T offers a wide rang e of fares and passes throug h their Z iptrip prog r am. The base fare is $1.75 with free transfers and half fares ($0. 85) are offered t o seniors 65 years of ag e and older and individuals with disabilities. GBT a lso offers a variety of short -term passes which are valid for calendar days only, beg inning at the t ime t he pa ss is purchased. One -day passes can be purchased on board, and 7 -d ay and 31 -d ay passes can be purchased throug h the mail, the GB T bus station and at various Stop & Shop grocery stores in the region. S in g le Fare Price Adult $1.75 Elderly /disabled $0.85 Tra nsfer Free Passes 1-day $4.0 0 7-day $1 7.50 31 -day $70 .00 Tabl e 19. GBT Fare s Fleet As of March 2017, the GBT fixed -route fleet consisted of 57 active fixed route vehicles and 13 spares. The fleet consist s of 35- to 40-foot buses , many of which were manufactured before 2010 (Table 20). Two of the buses are hybrid diesel -electric. In addition, all vehicle s a re wheelchair accessible in accordance with requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) . The oldest buses in the fleet, with the most miles, are the 2003 New Flyer’s , heavy duty buses , they are past their useful life of 12 years an d many are approaching their useful mileage of 500,000. Th ose pa st their useful life are scheduled to be replaced by Fa ll 2017 with 20 hybrid diesel -electric vehicles and 22 clean diesel vehicles ( Table 21) . Approximately six of the 2003 New Flyer’ s will be put Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 26 New Haven Transit Key Findings for the Corridor • GB T has underg one several minor service reductions in the past few years due to a decrease in state funding . • It is difficult to serve the rail st a t ions, due to the low frequency of most bus routes. Creating and maintaining connections to the WB L is challeng ing as their schedules chang e reg ularly. • Route 15 will be converted to limited st op service between the Hawley Lane Mall and D erby Train Stati on as part of the one- to three -year recommendations. • Along R oute 15 ridership is consistent throug hout the day with peaks and valleys. • R oute 23 ridership peaks during the peak commuting hours. • On the R oute 22X the majority of passeng ers depart in the mor ning at locations in the Shelton B usiness Park indicating this is a commuter route. • Only two routes (23 and 15) service stations along the WB L. All routes into a contingency fleet for emergency only; the rest will be sold off. GBT is also pursuing a pilot prog ram for five to six electric buses. Once the new vehicles arrive, the fleet is expected to be in g ood condition ( Table 22). Year Make Mo d el Length Capacity Co u nt 2003 N e w F l y er D40LF 40 79 13 2003 N e w F l y er D35LF 35 64 25 2003 N e w F l y er D40LF 40 79 2 2011 N e w F l y er X c el s i or H 40 78 2 2012 Gillig LF 40 80 15 Tabl e 20. GBT Fleet Summary Year Make Mo d el Length Capacity Co u nt 2011 N e w F l y er X c el s i or H 40 78 2 2012 Gillig LF 40 80 15 2017 N e w F l y er X c el s i or H 40 79 10 20 17 N e w F l y er Xcelsior 40 79 7 20 17 N e w F l y er X c el s i or H 35 64 10 20 17 N e w F l y er Xcelsior 35 64 15 Tabl e 21. GBT Fleet Summery by the End of 2017 Condi ti on Y e ar M ake Model Vehicle Count Fai r Good Excellent 2011 New Fl yer X c el s i or H 2011 X 2012 Gillig LF 2012 X 2017 New Fl yer X c el s i or H 2017 X 2017 New Fl yer Xcelsior 20 17 X 2017 New Fl yer X c el s i or H 20 17 X 2017 New Fl yer Xcelsior 20 17 X Tabl e 22. GBT Fleet Condition Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 27 2 .1.4 Prog ramed Imp rovements CTtran s it Waterbury The Waterbury Area Transit Study (W ATS) was recently completed and provides recommendations for immediate , short -term, mid -term and long -term modifications . The recommendations build upon each other and are dependent on previous phase recommendations being implemente d. Short -term recommendations that impact corridor communities or service to the rail stations include restructuring the Naug atuck routes, providing all -day service between Naug atuck and Waterbury and improving on- time performances on the R outes 441 and 442. Long -term recommendations include d a potential commuter bus route from Waterbury to Shelton via R oute 8. In order for the recommendations to be implemented, funding would need to be identified and CTD OT would be responsible for the implementation of s ervice changes. Figure 48. Waterbury Service Improvements for Corridor Communities There have been several operational chang es to service within the last five to six years including the addition of evening service and holiday service . I n 2011 service wa s extended from 6:00 PM to midnig ht on many routes throug h a pilot prog ram funded by the colleg es with a UPa ss program . Holiday Service was implemented in 2015 o n New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor D ay, Thanksg iving , and Christmas with the introduction of CT fastrak. Recent c apital improvements in development include a new maintenance facility and new fare system. The new maintenance facility is located at 761 Frost B ridg e R oad in Watertown, approximately a mile and a quarter away from the former facility. The new fareboxes include automatic vehicle location and automatic passeng er counters. •Restructure the Naugatuck Routes to provide all day service Immediate •Truncate Route 42 at the Leever Cancer Center and service Naugatuck Valley Community College on all trips Short •Improve ontime perfromance on the Route 40 by decreasing headways Mi d •Improve frequency in Naugatuck • Add commuter route to Shelton Long Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 28 Figure 49. C Tt ransi t Waterbury Programed Improvements Timeline CTtran s it New Haven CTt ra nsit New Haven conducted an alternatives analysis – bus study called the “Move New Haven Transit Mobility Study” to develop and evaluate transit improvements for the Greater New Haven Reg ion. The study wa s broken into two phases. Pha se 1 wa s a combination of public input, stakeholder coordination and data collection. The Second Phase define d the specific corridor -based alternatives for capital investment and service recommendations. The st udy finding s have been under review and are sla ted to be completed in 2018. The study is the result of a 2011 FTA Streetcar study grant to the City of New Haven. There have been very few capital improvements since the construction of the new maintenance and operations facility in 2010. The new 285,000- square-foot facility is equipped with modern equipment , 12 maintenance ba ys and indoor st ora g e for up to 140 buses. The state is in the process of deploying technolog y upg rades to the entire CTt ra nsit fleet. In April 2017 real -time bus arrival information on the New Haven fleet was made available to smartphone holders. Other technolog ies being installed include automatic passeng er counters, automatic annunciation, and centraliz ed schedule data using Trapeze. CTt ra nsit is upg rading it s fa re syst em wit h contactless smartcard technolog y, fare capping , and mobile payments. N ew fareboxes have been installed on CTtransit New Haven buses . The new technolog y was deployed system wide and a mobile application is anticip ated in the near future . CTt ra nsit in New Haven is a leader in the state with equipment. I n 2011 they were the first in Connecticut to beg in operating hybrid diesel vehicles. That same year they became the first to operate 60-foot -articulated buses thereb y increasing the capacity on core routes. Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 29 Figure 50. C Tt ransi t New Haven Programed Improvements Timeline Greater Bridgeport Transit GBT has a long rang e transit plan that provides a blueprint fo r the next 10 years , but due to reduction of funding at the state level it may take long er for recommendations to be implemented. Unfortunately GB T ha d to reduce service as a result of the reduction in state investment in bus operations. GBT is currently looking to eliminate routes 14, 16 and 20, reduce service on the R oute 10 and Coastal Link and make minor scheduling and routing adjustments on the R outes 5, 7, 3, and 23. There have been very few operational changes to service within the last five years, mainly minor schedule adjustment s. I n February 2014 R oute 20 was added (two round trips during both the PM and AM peaks). Most recently, (October 2016) GBT underwent a service reduction to eliminate underutiliz ed trips on most of the rout es. Several early morning and evening trips were e liminated. Capital improvements have included a new intermodal center in 2007 with a pedestrian bridg e to the rail station and ferry terminal, the addition of dynamic messag e sig ns at the transit center in 2009 and the installation of heated shelt ers on t he bus terminal platform in 2011. In 2007 when the new $26 million intermodal was opened, service was restructured to improve coverag e and reduce duplication. At the same time the new center opened the z iptrip pass prog ram was created and the system underw ent rebranding . In 2017 GBT will replace 73% of their fixed route fleet with new hybrid diesel -electric buses . While the replacement of vehicles is the opportune time to expand service, the current maintenance facility is at its capacity and any additional vehicles must be stored outside. Fig ure 51 provides an outline of capital improvements and service chang es within the last 10 years and future chang es as outlined in the long rang e transit plan. Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 30 Figure 51. GBT Programed Improvements Timeline 2.2 Passenger Rail Service The Waterbury B ranch Line (WB L ) is one of M etro-North Railroad’ s (M NR’s) three branches off of the New Haven Main Line in Connecticut. The line is 27.1 miles long, has no active pa ssing siding s, is not signalized, ha s 6 st a t ions, and there are 16 g ra de crossing s. The WB L beg ins in B ridg eport and includes stops at D erby- Shelton, Ansonia, Seymour, Beacon Falls, Naugatu ck, and Waterbury. Some weekday trains also stop in Stratford between B ridg eport and D erby -Shelton. Passenger rail service on the WB L dates back to 1849. Service was orig inally provided by the Naug atuck R ailroad , later purchased by the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad (NYNH&H) in 1885. In 1969 the NYNH&H went bankrupt and merg ed into Penn Central Transportation. The new entity declared bankruptcy one year later and the New York Metropolitan Authority (MTA) and State of Connecticut beg an subsidiz ing the New Haven line and its branches. I n 1976 Conrail was formed to operate the service , but by 1983 Conrail became a non- financially viable operation. With the passag e of the Northeast R ail Service Act in 1981 MTA and CTDOT formed the Metro – North Commuter Railroad. 5 I n 1976 there were only eig ht trains daily (four in each direction), this increased to twelve by 1993. T oday t he WB L passeng er train schedule consist s of 15 weekday t ra ins (Fig ure 52) 6 between Waterbury and B ridg eport. There are eig ht northbound and seven southbound trains daily Monday throug h Friday. With the exception of one AM Peak train, service to Grand Central Termi nal (GCT) requires a transfer at Bridgeport Station to synchroniz ed New Haven Main Line trains. The AM Peak for the New Haven Line and it s B ranches is defined as trains arriving at GCT between 5:00AM and 10:00AM or departing from GCT between 5:30AM and 9:00AM . There are two southbound AM peak trains and one northbound. The PM Peak is defined as trains that depart GCT between 4:00PM and 8:00PM ; there are two trains which meet this 5 http: //railfan. com/archiv e/rf_archiv e_0694_M etroNor th. php 6 This schedule is effectiv e October 2, 2016 through April 1, 2017. Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 31 definition . All WB L trains stop at D erby- Shelton, Ansonia, Seymour, B eacon Falls, Naug atuck, and Waterbury Stations. One southbound peak hour morning train, one northbound peak hour afternoon train, and one northbound evening train also stop at the Stratford station. One morning peak hour train continues to St a mford. Figure 52. WBL Weekday Schedule 7 Weekend and holiday service on the WB L includes 12 t ra ins ( Fig ure 53). As with weekday service, all service to GCT req uires passeng ers to transfer trains at B ridg eport Station to synchroniz ed New Haven Main Line trains. 7 Sc hedul e effec ti ve Jul y 1 , 2018 Figure 53. WBL Weekend/Holiday Schedule 8 2.2.1 Travel Times A weekday trip between Waterbury and GCT is around 87 miles, takes an average o f two hours and 31 minutes in both directions and travels at an averag e speed of around 35 MPH (Table 23 and Table 24 ). Since 1976 the travel time has increased slightly each year as more service is added to the main line tracks. The 1976 one -way travel time between Waterbury and GCT was two hours and 22 minutes. A trip between Waterbury and B ridg eport takes an average of 55 minutes. The average north bound trip on the WB L takes a minute long er than its sout h bound counterpart. The transfer wait time in B ridg eport is 5 -7 minutes on weekends and 3 -10 on weekdays . If a transfer is mis s ed h ead in g to wa rds Waterbury, there is a three – h o u r wait fo r th e n ext train . Mis s ed tran s fers to New York have a 30-min u te wait fo r th e n ext train . 8 Sc hedul e effec ti ve Jul y 1 , 2 0 1 8 Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 32 Tr ain Waterbury to Bridgeport Waterbury to GCT 1923 1819 0:55 2:24 1935 1533 0:58 2:30 1951 1551 0:55 2:33 1961 1561 0:55 2:24 1971 1571 0:55 2:35 1981 1581 0:55 2:30 1991 1591 0:55 2:33 1997 1497 0:55 2:41 Ave r age 0:55 2:31 Tabl e 23. WBL Weekday Travel Times to NYC Tr ain Bridgeport to Waterbury GCT t o Waterbury 1506 1906 0:55 2:37 1516 1916 0:55 2:32 1524 1924 0:56 2:29 1534 1934 0:55 2:32 1548 1948 0:59 2:17 1574 1974 0:55 2:33 1588 1988 0:57 2:35 Ave r age 0:56 2:31 Tabl e 24. WBL Weekday Travel Times to Waterbury Travel time and speeds vary between stations (Table 25 and Fig ure 54) and are correlated to the leng th of the seg ment, track conditions, and number of at -g rade crossin g s. The maximum operating speed for the track is 59 mph per Federal R ailroad Administration (FR A) rules because the line is currently not signalized . This also limit s the amount of service that can be provided as only one train set can be on the tracks at a time. The line is currently in the process of becoming sig naliz ed. However, even with sig naliz ation, passing siding s would be needed to accommodate more frequent b idirectional service. Track charts show that the class of track, which impacts speed, fluctuates between Class 3 and Class 2 with a short segment of Class 1 at the Devon Wye. Cla ss 3, which allows for the hig hest speed on the WB L, accounts for roug hly 82% of the tracks. Table 25 provides a breakdown of speed by mile post and track class ; overall t he average operating speed is 38 miles per hour. The seg ment with the grea test speed i s between the Devon Wye and D erby – Shelton Station because it is the largest segment, allowing the train to operate at hig her speeds long er and has the g rea t est leng t h of Cla ss 3 t ra cks. The seg ment with the lowest speed is between Ansonia and D erby, since the short distance limits the maximum achievable speed to 45 mph even thoug h the tracks are capable of hig her speeds . Figure 54. Trave l Ti me between WBL Stations Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 33 Between Speed Trac k C l ass CP 261 – Through East & West L e gs o f Wye 10 1 East & We st L e gs of Wye t o M P 7 .7 59 3 MP 7.7 – MP 8.1 45 3 MP 8.1 – MP 8.9 25 2 MP 8.9 – MP 10.4 45 3 MP 10.4 – MP 11.2 25 2 MP 11.2 – MP 12 .3 45 3 MP 12. 3 – MP 1 3.5 59 3 MP 1 3.5 – MP 14.4 50 3 MP 14.4 – MP 14.7 30 2 MP 14.7 – MP 14.9 50 3 MP 14.9 – MP 17.8 59 3 MP 17.8 – MP 18.5 40 3 MP 18.5 – MP 19.5 50 3 MP 19.5 – MP 20.3 45 3 MP 20.3 – MP 21.8 50 3 MP 21.8 – MP 22.6 40 3 MP 22.6 – MP 24.2 50 3 MP 24.2 – MP 25.4 59 3 MP 25.4 – MP 25.6 50 3 MP 25.6 – MP 27.1 30 2 Tabl e 25. Spe e d and Trac k C l ass Dat a for WBL 2.2.2 Equipment The WB L and D anbury B ranch Line are the two branch lines that are not electrified. Equipment is shared between the two lines. While there are three train sets between the two branch lines, t he WB L only utilizes t wo of the three train sets . E ach train set consist s of 2008 B rookville locomotives and three coaches . The small fleet siz e and sharing between branche s limits the ability to add service once signalization of the lin e is complete. Under Federal R ailroad Administration (FR A) rules each locomotive must underg o an inspection daily. The inspection takes two hours and requires maintenance facilities with bays and pits for diesel equipment. Stamford and New Haven are the only two yards desig ned to handle diesel equipment and which have fueling capabilities. Currently all WBL locomotives , coaches, and cab cars are stored at the Stamford yard. I n the morning , two trains depart Stamford Yard deadheading to Waterbury. The first set clears the end of block at Waterbury Station and waits for the second trainset to arrive . The second trainset becomes revenue train 1923 (the first AM train) to B ridg eport and continues onto South Norwalk where it then does one round trip on the D anbur y B ranch. Once it completes its run on the D anbury B ranch it travels to the Stamford Yard to be fueled and have the toilets serviced and then returns to B ridg eport where it then runs five round trips as t ra ins 1924/1971, 1934/1981, 1948/1991, 1974/1997 and 1988/DH1185. The first set runs a s t ra ins 1935/1906, 1951/1916 and then 1961 and deadheads to Stamford to be fueled . I t is then used on the D anbury B ranch Line for three round trips . Trains that operate between B ridg eport and Waterbury reverse direction in B ridg eport just west of interlock 255 (by the Hubbard B all Park). I n Waterbury the shuttles reverse direction at the station. Equipment used on the WB L is stored in Stamford and deadheads to the station. The equipment returns to Stamford after the last northbound train arrives in Waterbury. I n the event of equipment /mechanical issues, planned outag es or issues on either the D anbury or Waterbury B ranch Line tracks , bussing is instituted along the corridors . While the MTA relies on the CTt ra nsit divisions and districts to provide bussing during outag es they are not equipped to do so. An on -call RFP for vehicles and operators was issued by CTD OT but there was very little response. B ussing is currently provided by the CTt ra nsit New Haven garage as they have the largest spare ratio. Unplanned outag es occur red as many as 3 -5 t imes a month before January, 2018. C ommunication issues have been reported between MTA and CTt ra nsit New Haven resulting in last minute needs and/or unneeded buses . Recently, there have been improvements to reduce these out a g es. 2.2.3 Funding Fares on the WB L are based on distance and time of day and whether they are purchased on board or not . Fa res between the stations on the WB L are classified as intermediate at all times and are $2.50 if purchased ahead of time and $9. 00 on board. Table 26 shows fa res between the WB L and key main line stations during both the peak and off peak times. Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 34 Des tin atio n Peak Off -peak Bridgeport $2.75 $2.75 S tamfo rd $6.50 $6.50 Grand Central Station $20.50 $15.50 Tabl e 26. WBL Fare s (2017) Waterbury is the only station on the branch line where ticket kiosks are available . I n 2016 the MTA launched a mobile ticketing app called MTA eTix which allows users to purchase mobile tickets directly from their smartphone or mobile device. CTD OT funds the operations of the New Haven Main Line, its branches , Shoreline East and the Hart ford Line. Commuter rail and commuter bus in Connecticut are funded with 90. 3% state funding and 9. 7% farebox revenue 9. The operating cost per revenue hour is $737. 03 and the WB L operates approximately 5, 100 revenue hours a year resulting in an annual oper ating cost of $3.76 million. 2.2.4 Infrastructure The WB L has numerous crossing s including culverts, streams/rivers, roadways, pedestrian paths, and pipelines. D etailed maps can be found in Appendix A. Track charts provided by Metro -North R ailroad for 2017 showed that there were approximately 51 below -g rade structures on the WB L . The below g rade st ruct ures include culverts (70%), pipes (24%) and other underg round structures (6%). The majority of the pipes and culverts carry water under the rail line but the re are several g as pipes and underg round powerlines. There are 19 roadway overpasses, 9 roadway under pa sses a nd 16 a t g ra de crossing s. The at -g ra de crossing s include two rail road, nine private road and five public roa d crossing s. The private road crossing s ha ve no protection a side from sig na g e ; the public road crossing s offer a combination of flashing lig hts and g ates ( Table 27). The WB L crosses R out e 8 a t four locations, at all instances the rail line passes under the road. 9 Connecticut Department of Transportation 2014 Annual Ag ency Profile – NT D Tow n Street Protection Milford Ca s wel l Str eet F l a s h i ng l i g hts a n d g a tes Milford Oronoque Road F l a s h i ng l i g hts a n d g a tes Milford Gr ea t Ri ver Roa d F l a s h i ng l i g hts a n d g a tes Der by Division Street F l a s h i ng l i g hts a n d g a tes W a ter bury Ea gl e Str eet Flashing lights Tabl e 27. At Grade Public Road Crossings WBL I n addition to roadway crossing s there are 28 other crossing s of non -roadway above g round structur es. Nine of t he crossing s are structures that pass over the roadway and include pipes, walkways and trusses. Six of these structures are located in Ansonia at the site of the old Farrel Corporation and include walkways, a truss, a monorail and pipes. The remai ning locations include an overhead pedestrian footbridg e in Seymour, a pipeline at the former US R ubber Manufacturing site in Naug atuck, and in Waterbury the Meriden R ailroad B ridg e . There are 19 railroad bridg es over non- roadway structures: 16 are over wa t erwa ys, including st rea m/river crossing s, spillways and canals. The WB L crosses t he Na ug a t uck R iver at four locations. The remaining three bridg es are for pedest ria n a ccess. There are 16 interlock ing s along the WB L; six which are active and ten are inact ive. The interlock ings provide access to connecting rail lines, siding s and spurs. There is one active siding of ballast track between mile points 0. 6 and 1. 1 and one inactive siding in Waterbury between mile posts 26.5 and 26.8. I n addition to the siding there are three active spur s to provide access to O& G I ndustries, Hubbard Hall, and Kerrite and six inactive spurs. The WB L connects to two other rail lines using a wye. The D evon W ye provides access to the New Haven Main Line tracks and is operable in both the north bound and southbound directions. The Maybrook Line connects to the WBL at the D erby W ye, but it is currently inactive . I t could, however, be reactivated at any time. The Maybrook L ine is owned by the Housatonic R ailroad Company wit h trackage rig hts g ranted to the Providence & Worcester (now owned by Genesee & Wyoming Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 35 Railroad) . In 2010 the 12- mile segment of track between B otsford and D erby was taken out of service. 2 .2.5 Rid ership D uring the summer 2017 the Naug atuck Valley Council of Gover nments surveyed WB L passeng ers over a three day period between September 19 th and the 21 st. Overall the Waterbury B ranch has approximately 1,014 daily riders; t his is a 17% increase from 2016 and is on par with 2011 ridership. The inbound (towards G CT) 7: 38 AM and outbound (towards Waterbury) 6:00 PM have the g reatest number of riders ( Table 28 and Table 29). Fifteen percent of the riders are traveling between WBL st a t ions; this is up from 9% in 2016. I nbound, the Waterbury Station accounts for the hig hest number of boarding s, accounting for 60.8% of all riders. Beacon Falls ha s the lowe st boarding s of any WBL station , accounting for only 3.3% of ridership. The most common destination for inbound riders is B ridg eport , which records the greatest number of alig hting s, accounting for 49.8% (Table 30 and Table 31). Tr ain Number Bridgeport Tim e Maximum L oad Way Ride r s 10 Tot al Ride r s 1923 6:39 AM 95 3 98 1935 7:38 AM 78 35 113 1951 10:07 AM 71 8 79 1961 12:46 PM 42 16 58 1971 3:05 PM 27 15 42 1981 5:46 PM 31 15 46 1991 8:12 PM 44 4 48 1997 11:00 PM 20 7 27 103 511 Tabl e 28. Summer 2017 Average WBL Inbound Ridership by Train 10 Way riders is the number of passengers who get off inbound trains or board outbound trains north of Bridgeport Tr ain Number Bridgeport Tim e Maximum L oad Way Ride r s Tot al Ride r s 1906 8:02 AM 42 13 54 1916 10:41 AM 43 7 50 1924 1:01 PM 49 9 52 1934 3:41 PM 64 21 82 1948 6:00 PM 132 16 147 1974 8:31 PM 70 9 79 1988 11:17 PM 35 4 39 79 503 Tabl e 29. Summer 2017 Average WBL Outbound Ridership by Train Station Boarding Alight ing Waterbury 311 0 Naugatuck 69 16 Beacon Falls 17 4 Seymour 23 16 Ans oni a 46 23 Der by -Shel ton 45 21 Str a tfor d 0 23 Bri dgeport 0 408 Tot al 511 511 Tabl e 30. Waterbury Branch Station Inbound Ridership Summer 2017 Station Boarding Alight ing Waterbury 0 305 Naugatuck 18 79 Beacon Falls 4 10 Seymour 15 34 Ans oni a 14 35 Der by -Shel ton 25 39 Str a tfor d 3 1 Bri dgeport 424 0 Tot al 503 503 Tabl e 31. Waterbury Branch Station outbound ridership summer 2017 Fig ure 55 and Fig ure 56 show maps of boardings and alig hting s for both the inbound and outbound directions . I n the outbound direction one -third of the activity at the intermediate stops are boarding s, indicating travel among st the WB L stations. The D erby -Shelt on Station has the g reatest number of boarding s for an intermediate station while Stratford records the lowest. Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 36 Figure 55. WBL Outbound Ridership Map Along the inbound direction 40% of the activity at intermediate stations , not inc luding Stratford, are alightings, further indicating travel between WB L st a t ions. The Ansonia Station has the g reatest number of alig hting s for an intermediate station. Figure 56. WBL In bound Ridership Map 2.2.6 Programed Improv ements The WB L is currently underg oing several capital improvements including sig naliz ation, passing siding s and improved railroad crossing s. Signalization will be installed concurrently with positi ve train control and will allow an increase in the number of trains that can safely operate along the branch line at the same time. I n addition to the new sig nal system there will be four passing siding s in D evon, D erby, B eacon Falls and Waterbury ; each will have interlock ings at both ends. The B ea con Fa lls pa ssi ng siding will be completed first. Crossing s, both private and public, will either be closed or upg raded to receive full protection with active warning devices. Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 37 Figure 57. WBL Programmed Improvements WB L improvements are currently nearing final desig n approval with construction anticipated to beg in in 2019 and completed within two years. R outine maintenance such as rail and tie replacement and crossing upg rades are ong oing . Preliminary cost estimates for t he WB L improvements (4 passing siding s, sig naliz ation, and PTC) are $7 million for design, $10 million for material procurement and $63 million for construction. Additional WB L long term improvements include station improvements and increased service frequency. Syst em wide prog rammed improvements to Metro North , which will impact the WBL, include real -time informat ion at the stations, new coaches and locomotives , and upg raded ticket vending machines. Real -time information is scheduled to be installed at a ll Main Line stations by the end of 20 20. CTDOT is reviewing funding available to purchase new push- pull diesel-hauled coaches and locomotive for the Hartford, D anbury and Waterbury lines, with the procurement process beg inning in late 2018. Long term pro g rammed improvements, as part of the 30 – year plan for Let’ s Go CT! , include improving service on the branch lines, providing feeder bus routes to rail stations, new diesel fleet equipment, fleet expansion, and maintenance facilities and yards on the branch lines. To improve service along the main line and branch lines the fleet of diesel equipment will be replaced and expanded at a cost of $530 million over the next 30 years. CTDOT is analy z ing diesel hauled equipment purchases to replace Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 38 Key Findings for the WBL Corridor • There are several major capital improvements underway on the WB L including Positive Train Control (P TC), sig naliz ation, crossing s and siding s. • System wide improv ements are aimed at improving the passeng er experience and include real time information and mobile ticketing. • The WBL is largely at -grade with severa l crossing s. Most g ra de crossing s a re not sig naliz ed and lack protection, but with the new signalization project many more will receive flashing lights and gates. • Mechanical issues wit h t he locomot ives have led to numerous service disruptions each month , resulting in the need to provide replacement bussing . Often little notice can be g iven to CTtransit, the designated emergency service provider, and there is often lack of communication between MTA and CTtransit New Haven to provide updates if the situation chang es and the buses are no long er needed. • Travel time on the WBL between Derby and B ridg eport is 21 mi nutes. • The station with the g reatest number of boarding and alig hting pa sseng ers, a side from Bridgeport , is Waterbury, followed by Naug atuck. • Fleet size and lack of service/storage facilities are the primary limitation s in being able to expand service on t he WB L once sig naliz ation and additional passing sidings are complete. CTDOT is analyzing the potential to add rail cars to the WB L. • The WB L has a long history of providing passenger service. the ag ing fleet and is planning to phase in purchases based on need and funding availability. R ecent capital improvements include creating a new passeng er entrance and off -street passeng er drop z one at the Waterbury Station, improvements to the New Haven Storag e Yard, upg rading of crossing s, and the deployment of a mobile ticketing platform. In 2014 the former SNET B uilding was demolished at the Waterbury Station and a new passeng er entrance was added; a lso including increased parking . 2 .3 Connecting Services This section examines connecting transportation services to the corridor communities. I t include s paratransit services, commuter bus, intercity bus, ferry, taxi, Transportation Network Companies ( TNCs) such a s Uber and Lyft , and rideshare services. Figure 58. Connecting Transportation Services in the Corridor Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 39 2 .3.1 Paratransit North East Transportation (NET) provides complementary ADA paratra nsit service in Waterbury, Middlebury, Naug atuck, Prospect, Southbury, Cheshire, Thomaston, Wolcott and Waterbury under contract to CTt ra nsit for the Greater Waterbury Transit District . Paratransit service operates during fixed route service hours and will pick up and discharg e passeng ers within a ¾ -mile radius of fixed route local bus services in Waterbury. New in 2017, NET coordin ates with th e Greater New Haven Transit District and Valley Transit District to provide inter -district service. Valley Transit District (VTD) provides complementary ADA paratransit service in the communities of Ansonia, D erby, Seymour and Shelton. The paratransit ser vice operates during the fixed route service hours of the GB T R oute 15 and CTt ra nsit New Haven R oute 255 and will pick up and drop off passeng ers within 3/4 mile of either route. The service is also open to the g eneral public using a shared ride syst em Monday- Friday between 6:00 am and 5:30 pm. On Saturdays compl ementary ADA paratransit service in the reg ion is provided by the Greater New Haven Transit District. The one -way fare for seniors, riders with AD A Certification, and those taking work or school t rips is $3.50 and the g eneral public riders fare is $4. 50 (2017) . VTD is located adjacent to the D erby-Shelton Station . I t is currently being upg raded and expanded. The improved facility will lower operating costs, help to better maintain vehicles, impro ve vehicle flow in the yard, and consume less energy. GBT provides complementary AD A paratransit service throug h a demand response service known a s GB T Access. GB T Access opera t es in the communities of B ridg eport and portions of Fairfield, Stratford, Trum bull, Milford, Monroe, Shelton, D erby, Westport and Norwalk throug h an operating contract with Transdev . The paratransit service operates during the fixed route service hours and will pick up and drop off passeng ers within 3/4 mile of all GB T bus routes. T he one -way fare is $3.50. I n addition to AD A paratransit services there are several other prog rams which provide transportation in the reg ion. Many of the communities operate their own minibus service for elderly residents. The Greater Waterbury Transit D i strict (operated by NET) provides a dial -a -ride service to the elderly and disabled Monday throug h Friday from 9 :00 AM to 4:30 PM. The Northwest R eg ion Access to Jobs (JobLinks) provides people of low income work related transportation ; this prog ram helps fund the CTt ra nsit T74, T114, T74, T49, and T81 tripper routes to industrial parks. 2.3.2 Commuter Bus Service Commuter bus service is provided by CTt ra nsit and GBT. The commuter service differs from the local fixed route services in t ha t its routes are designed to meet the needs of inter -city commuters. I n Waterbury the service to Hartford is operated by D ATTCO and to Torring ton by NET. Two routes operate between Hartford and Waterbury, the 925 and the 928. These routes are part of t he CTf astrak service and connect to the busway in New Britain. The 925 operates during weekday peak hours only while the 928 operates during the off peak and on weekends. The primary difference between the two routes is that the 925 does not stop at the Cheshire Milldale Park & Ride or the Southington Plantsville Park & R ide. Figure 59. Downtown Waterbury Hartford Express Bus Circulation I n Waterbury both routes serve t he Wa t erbury Green and t rain station in both the inbound and outbound Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 40 directions . At the train station the route stops on Meadow Street adjacent to the t rain station. Express route fares are z onal based on upon the distance travel ed. A trip between Hartford and Waterbury is $6. 00, and between the Waterbury Green and Train Station is $3.20. The 410 Torring ton/Waterbury Flyer is a weekday express bus which serves the Waterbury Train Station, when heading inbound towards the Waterbury Green. The Coastal Link is a regional route between the Connecticut Post Mall in Milford an d the Wheels Hub in Norwalk and is jointly operated between GB T, the Milford Transit District (MTD) and the Norwalk Transit District (NTD). Service is operated seven days a week from 5:30 AM to 11:00 PM on weekdays, 6:00 AM to 10:30 PM on Saturdays and 8:3 0 AM to 7:30 PM on Sundays. The fare for this route is $1.75. GBT operates two express/commuter bus routes, the R oute 19X and 22X. B oth routes operate during the peak hours only and on weekdays . The R oute 19X is an express bus service to Monroe from the BT C. The R oute 22X operates from the BTC to the Shelton R esearch I ndustrial Park ; it does not connect to downtown Shelton. The fare for both of these routes is $1. 75. Rout e Ope r at or Days operated Weekday Service Span (hrs) Round Tr ips Daily Towns Served Rail St at ion s Served Ride rship Pe r Day 410 Torrington – Waterbury Flyer CTtr a ns it W a ter bury NET M-F 15 9 .5 Torri ngton, Thomas ton, Waterbury Waterbury 40 925 Waterbury Express CTtr a ns it – Hartford DATTCO M-F 5 .5 5 Waterbury, Cheshire, New Br i ta in, Har tford Waterbury 130 928 Southington – Cheshire- Waterbury Express CTtr a ns it – Hartford DATTCO M-Su 20 17.5 Waterbury, Cheshire, Southi ngton, New Britain, Hartford Waterbury 98 Coast al L ink GBT & MTD & NTD M-F 18 44.5 Mi l fo rd , Str atfo rd, Bri dgeport, Fa irfield, W es tpor t, Nor walk Milford, Bri dgeport, Fa i rf ield 3,215 22X Bridgeport Avenue GBT M-F 7 3 .5 Br i dgeport, Str a tford, Shel ton Bri dgeport 19X GBT M-F 4 .5 4 .5 Bri dgeport, Trumbull, Monroe Bri dgeport 36 Tabl e 32. Corridor Commuter Bus Service 2.3.3 Intercity Bus Service I ntercity transit in the reg ion is provided by Peter Pan B us Lines, I nc. and Greyhound Lines, I nc. with stations in Waterbury and B ridg eport . The Waterbury intercity bus station (serviced by Peter Pan B us Lines) is located at 188 Bank Street, approximately 1,000 feet from the Waterbury Green and local bus route pulse point and 1,800 feet from the Waterbury train station. Direct service from Waterbury is provided to and fro m Hartford, Farming ton, Southbury, D anbury and New York City. The route that runs between Hartford and New York Cit y , with stops in Waterbury, offers 15 trips daily, seven to Hartford and eig ht to N ew York. The B ridg eport Greyhound B us Terminal is located at the B ridg eport Transportation Center (B TC), at 710 Water Street , providing direct access to transfer with local GB T bus routes. The train station is connected to the bus terminal via an elevated covered walkway . Peter Pan B us Lines provides direct serv ice between B ridg eport and New York City, New Haven, and Hartford. One trip daily is provided to New Haven and Hartford and two trips to New York Cit y. Greyhound operates seven trips a day which service the B ridg eport Station. Three trips daily are Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 41 to Stam ford, White Plains and New York Cit y , and four to New Haven, New London, Moheg an Sun, Foxwoods, Providence and B oston. 2 .3.4 Ferry Service The B ridg eport Terminal at the Water Street Dock is located 1,000 feet south of the train station and is maintained and operated by the B ridg eport Port Authority. Passenger and vehicle ferry service is operated by the B ridg eport & Port Jefferson Steamboat Company between B ridg eport and Port Jefferson Long I sland New York. The ferry provides 11 round trips daily with inc reased service during the summer months , Fridays and on weekends . Travel time between the two ports is approximately one hour and 15 minutes . The one -way passeng er fare is $17 and for vehicles under 20’ in leng th it is $56.00 (2017). 2 .3.5 Taxi/ TNC S ervices /Car-Sharing There are several t axi companies operating in the corridor and include the following : • Metr o Ca b – Bri dgeport • Yellow Taxi – Bri dgeport • Ace Ca b Co – B ridg eport • Val l ey Cab Company – Ans oni a • Brass City Taxi Car Service – Waterbury Y ellow Ca b – Waterbury The fares for the taxi companies vary g reatly and a trip from the Waterbury Train Station to the B ridg eport Station is from $70 to $85. One taxi company, Metro Taxi, has wheelchair accessible taxis. TNCs use online platforms to connect passeng ers with drivers for a fee. Uber and Lyft operate in this corridor. An Uber trip between B ridg eport and Waterbury rang es between $38 and $50; a trip using Lyft is approximately $41. Car sharing prog rams in the U S have become increasing ly popular in cities and allow users to rent a car for short periods of times. I n the study corridor Z ipcar is the only car sharing program available. Zipcar has three cars available at two locations on the University of Bridgeport Campus. 2.3.6 Rideshare Services The Connecticut D OT created CT rides to administer ridesha ring services. CT rides consists of a network of employers and employees who seek alternative commute options. I nterested users can find a ridesharing partner throug h the free NuR ide online matching site at www.ctrides.com . I n addition to these CTD OT -sponsored prog rams, several private org aniz ations operate shuttles for their employees. These shuttles are entirely employer – funded (or the employer identifies funds) and include: • University of B ridg eport Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 42 Connecting Services Key Findings • There is coordinated paratransit service between the Waterbury Transit D istrict, Valley Transit District and New Haven Transit District to provide rides a cross jurisdictional boundaries. • The Commuter bus between Waterbury and Hartford is the only route to directly service the Waterbury Train Station. • B oth B ridg eport and Waterbury have intercity bus service but there is no direct intercity bus service between the two cities. Each station is located in proximity to the primary fixed route transit center in their respective cities. • Five taxi companies operate within the corridor, one is ADA accessible. • TNCs are half the cost of taxis for travel between B ridg eport and Waterbury. The cost for a TNC is four times greater than t he WB L. • Car sharing has not taken off in the corridor. • There are only two private employer – funded shuttles. B oth are operated by local universities . – This service is operated by campus securit y , and provides free shuttles between campus and popular destinations. • Sacred Heart University – Sacred Heart operates a shuttle service throug h the student union office to provide a shuttle from the campus to the B ridg eport Train Station. Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 43 3. PARKING 3.1 Methodology Parking was inventoried in order to understand current parking utilization and availability within half a mile of the Waterbury B ranch Line Stations for commuters. At each station the downt own core is within a half -mile and the parking was included in the inventory. Parking with time limitations were excluded from the inventory. A f ield inventory was conducted around half a mile of all Waterbury B ranch Line Stations for parking . All publi c municipal, state and privately owned surface lots, g arag es and on- street parking , which allowed for eig ht hours or more of occupancy were surveyed. Parking was surveyed Wednesday April 26 th, 2017 in order to represent a typical day. Parking counts were taken between 10:00 AM and 4:00 PM, which was presumed to be the peak parking period for the commuter rail stations. At each location parking spaces were counted and occupancy recorded, restrictions noted, and fees accounted for. For on -st r eet parking where there were no painted parking stalls , capacity was calculated by dividing the leng th of the road seg ment by the leng th of a typical parallel parking space (20’ ). 3.2 Station Parking Capacity and Utilization The WB L has 557 parking spaces at the rail stations and an additional 5, 259 within half a mile of the stations. At the time of inventory station parking utilization was 36.1%. The D erby/Shelton station has the hig hest utiliz ation at the station, and Ansonia has the hig hest in the downtown. B eaco n Falls has the lowest utiliz ation at both the station and downtown. All parking at the WB L st a t ions is free; out side of t he st a t ions it va ries by municipality. A summary of finding s are in Table 33. Station ½ Mile Tot al Station C apac i t y Occupied % Utilized Utilization Increase from 2002 C apac i t y Occupied % Utilized C apac i t y % Utilized Utilization Waterbury 248 45 18.1% Yes 3,253 1,195 36.7% 3,451 1,240 35.9% N augat uck 30 28 22.4% Yes 382 51 13.3% 412 79 15.6% Be acon Falls 54 8 14.8% Yes 314 23 7.3% 368 31 8.4% Seymour 23 14 60.9 No 328 79 24.8% 351 93 26.5% Ansonia 80 33 41.3% No 357 147 41.2% 437 180 41.2% Derby/Shelton 77 73 94.8% Yes 661 253 38.3% 738 326 44.2% Tot al 557 201 36.1% — 5,259 1,748 33.0% 5,825 1,949 33.3% Tabl e 33. Waterbury Branch Line Parking Capacity and Utilization 3.2.1 Waterbury The City of Waterbury has 3, 451 parking spaces available within half a mile of the station , which are open to the public for parking up to 10 hours or more. Parking is a mix of on -st reet , lot s a nd g a ra g es. Fig ure 60 provides information reg arding parking areas. I n the direct vicinity of the rail station there are 150 spaces plus six handicap spaces available for surface parking , plus 42 on- street parking spaces with 10 -hour time limits. D owntown Waterbury is within half a mile of the train station. I n the downtown area, there are an additional two surface parking lots, four g arag es and two streets with 10 -hour limits. T he B ucking ham Garag e (P2) on Grand Street is the larg est parking structure with 1, 400 spaces followed by the Scovill Street Garag e (P5) and Courtyard Marriott Garag e (P8) with 843 and 630 parking spaces respectively. Surface parking includes the East Main Street Lot (P4), Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 44 Waterbury Station Parking – Key Findings • Parking at the rail station is underutiliz ed. • Parking at the Waterbury Station has increased slightly since 2001. • All parking outside of the rail station is paid. • There is ample supply of parking in downtown Waterbury. • Parking ownership varies. The station parking is owned by the state, all on- street parking is owned by the municipality and parking g arag es/lots are owned by either Waterbury or private operators. Center Street Lot (P3) and West Main Street Lot (P6) with 200, 90 and 51 spots respectively. I n Waterbury there are approximate ly 630 on-street parking spaces, but only 89 spaces (including the 42 by the train station) allow for parking up to eig ht hours, locations include Meadow Street, State Street, and Union Street. Tabl e 34. Waterbury Parking Utilization The usag e rate for all parking observed was 34. 9%. The utilization rate at the train station is 18.1%, lower than the averag e. Parking downtown in g arag es and surface lots is slightly higher than the overall utilization. On – street parking in the downtow n has the hig hest utiliz ation at 66%, but at the rail station is just 10%. The 2001 station parking inventory, as part of the R ail Governance Study by CTD OT and conducted by Urbitran, listed utilization at 15.4%, indicating that utilization of the train s tation lot has increased slig htly. The 2001 study only examined the parking at the station lot, which included 156 spots. Parking was expanded in 2014 with the demolition of the adjacent former SNET building . Park in g Area Own ers h ip Parking adjacent to the tracks at the Waterbury Rail Station is owned by the State of Connecticut. This accounts for the majority (78. 8%) of the parking directly at the train station. The City of Waterbury owns the B ucking ham, Scovill Street and Courtyard Marriott Garages as well as the West Main Street Lot. The Center Street and East Main Street Lots are privately operated Public Parking Lots. Fee Structure Parking at the rail station lot is free for passengers but all other parking is paid. Table 35 provides a breakdown of cost s. N am e Cost P1 Rail St at ion Fr ee P2 Buckingham Gar age $2.00/hour P3 Center Street Lot $3.00 for the first hour, $2.00 each additional hour, or $10.00 per day P4 East Main Street Lot $5.00/day P5 Scovill St re e t Garage $2.00/hour P6 West Main Street Lot Meter ed P8 Courtyard Marriott Gar age $2.00/hour; max $12/day P1 1 Me adow St r eet Meter ed P1 2 Me adow St r eet Meter ed P1 3 Me adow St r eet Meter ed P14 State St r eet Meter ed P15 Union Street Meter ed P16 Union Street Meter ed P17 Union Street Meter ed Tabl e 35. Waterbury Parking Costs Na me Capacity Occupied Utilization P1 Rail St at ion 206 41 19.9 % P2 Buckingham Gar age 1400 624 44.6% P3 Center St Lot 90 74 82.2% P4 East Main St L ot 200 71 35.5% P5 Scovill St Garage 853 255 29.9% P6 West Main Street Lot 53 21 39.6% P8 Courtyard Mar r iot t Gar age 630 132 21.0% P1 1 Me adow St r eet 23 1 4.3% P1 2 Me adow St r eet 10 2 20.0% P1 3 Me adow St r eet 9 1 11.1% P14 State Street 7 7 100.0% P15 Union Street 6 6 100.0% P16 Union Street 12 2 16.7% P17 Union Street 2 3 150.0% Tot al 350 1 1240 34 .9 % Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 45 Figure 60. Wat e rbury Rai l St at i on P arki ng M ap Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 46 Naugatuck Station Parking – Key Findings • Parking at the rail station is underutiliz ed. • Parking at the Naug atuck Station has increased slightly since 2001. • All parking is free • I n D owntown Naug atuck most parking is on street • Parking at the rail station is owned by the state. 3.2.2 Naugatuck The B oroug h of Naug atuck has 412 parking spaces open to the public available within half a mile of the station without time restrictions. Most of this parking is on – street mixed -use parking within the vi cinity of the downtown. Fig ure 62 provides information reg arding parking areas. The historic Naug atuck rail station building and property is privately owned and houses a rest a ura nt . Throug h ag reement with Metro -North , 30 spa ces a t t he site are marked reserved for the use of rail travelers. The remaining 384 spots are on- street parking with a mix of painted stalls and wide shoulders. Figure 61. Naugat uc k St at i on P arki ng The usag e rate for all parking observed was 15. 6%. At the Naugatuck Rail Station surface lot the utilization was 22.4%. On -street parking utilization is highest along Cedar Street and Church Street from Cedar Street to Mapl e Street. The 2001 station parking inventory, as part of the R ail Governance Study by CTD OT and conducted by Urbitran, listed utilization at 10.3%, indicating that utiliz ation of the train station lot has increased. The 2001 study only examined the parking in the direct vicinity of the station. Park in g Area Own ers h ip All parking at and around the Naug atuck Train Station is owned by the City of Naug atuck. Fee Structure Parking at the Naug atuck Train Station and surrounding on -street parking is free. Nam e Capacit y O ccupie d Ut ilizat ion P18 30 28 22.4% P19 12 2 16.7% P20 24 4 16.7% P21 8 3 37.5% P22 9 6 66.7% P24 7 2 28.6% P25 3 3 100.0% P26 3 2 66.7% P27 4 1 25.0% P28 12 3 25.0% P29 3 1 33.3% P30 2 2 100.0% P31 13 3 23.1% P32 7 0 0.0% P33 3 2 66.7% P34 4 0 0.0% P38 1 1 100.0% P39 2 0 0.0% P41 4 3 75.0% P50 2 2 100.0% P53 9 0 0.0% P67 10 0 0.0% PCL _1 0 40 2 5.0% PCL _1 1 45 3 6.7% PCL _1 6 20 0 0.0% PCL _2 1 9 2 22.2% PCL _2 2 9 1 11.1% PCL _2 3 41 0 0.0% PCL _2 5 76 3 3.9% Tot al 412 79 15.6% Tabl e 36. Naugatuck Parking Utilization Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 47 Figure 62. Naugat uc k Rai l St at i on P arki ng M ap Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 48 Beaco n Falls S tatio n Park in g – Key Findings • Parking at the rail station is underutiliz ed. • Parking at the Waterbury Station has increased slig htly since 2001 but due to a recent parking lot expansion the utiliz ation has decreased a s more spa ces were added. • All parking outside of the rail station is on -street. 3.2.3 Beacon Falls The Town of B eacon Falls has 368 parking spaces available within half a mile of the station , which are open to the public without time restrictions. Most of this parking is on -street parking along R o ute 42 where the shoulder is wide enoug h to accommodate parking . The parking along the northern section of North Main Street primarily serves loca l businesses. Fig ure 64 provides information reg arding parking areas. I n the direct vicinity of the Train Station there are 51 spaces available for surface parking plus three handicap spaces. Figure 63. Be ac on Fal l s St at i on P arki ng The usag e rate for all parking observed was 8. 4%. At the Beacon Falls Train Station surface lot the utilization was 14.8%. On -street parking along R oute 42 averag ed 7. 3%, with hig her rates in the vici nity of the downtown. The 2001 station parking inventory, as part of the R ail Governance Study by CTD OT and conducted by Urbitran, listed utiliz ation at 21. 4%. The 2001 study only examined the parking in the direct vicinity of the station and at the time had a capacity of 28. The lot has since been expanded to 54 spaces and paved. Occupancy from 2001 to 2017 has increased slig htly from six to eig ht percent. N am e Capacit y O ccupie d Ut ilizat ion P54 54 8 14.8% P55 5 1 20.0% P56 2 1 50.0% P57 3 2 66.7% P65 18 3 16.7% P66 8 2 25.0% PCL _1 12 2 16.7% PCL _2 15 2 13.3% PCL _3 22 3 13.6% PCL _4 80 0 0.0% PCL _5 37 1 2.7% PCL _6 55 0 0.0% PCL _7 25 0 0.0% PCL _8 17 1 5.9% PCL _9 15 5 33.3% Tot al 368 31 8.4% Tabl e 37. Beacon Falls Parking Utilization Park in g Area Own ers h ip Parking at the B eacon Falls Train station is owned by the State of Connecticut. The Town of B eacon Falls owns the remaining on- street parking inventoried. Fee Structure Parking at the Beacon Falls Train Station and surrounding on -street parking is free. Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 49 Figure 64. Be ac on Fal l s St at i on P arki ng Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 50 Seymour Station Parking – Key Findings • There i s no l ong -term pa rking a vailable a t the s ta ti on but ther e a r e s everal l ots within 1 ,0 00 feet and on s treet parking along Humphrey Street and W a s hi n g to n Av e. • Parking at the Seymour Station has increased slightly since 2001. • Al l pa r king is fr ee. • The maj ority of on -s tr eet p a rk i ng i n d o wn to wn Seymour ha s ti me l imits tha t prevent c ommuters from parking there. 3.2.4 Seymour The Town of Seymour has 351 parking spaces available within half a mile of the station , which are open to the public without time restrictions. Parking is a mix of on – street and surface parking . D ue to the mixed- use nature of the downtown it is impossible to determine which spaces are utiliz ed by rail station users. Fig ure 66 provides information reg arding parking areas. At the rail station there is no long term public parking ; the spaces adjacent to the track are limited to two hours and just south of the platform along the tracks are restricted to B a nk of America cust omers. The majority of on -street parking within downtown Seymour is limited to two hours. There are four public parking lots without time limits but permits are required to park Monday-Frida y between 5:00 AM and 10:00 AM. The closest lot is at the intersection of Main Street (P58) and R oute 67, a walking distance of 300 feet to the train station, and has a capacity of 21 plus two handicap spots. Parking was also counted along Humphrey Street and Washing ton Avenue because there are no time constraints or required permits and access to the rail station is provided by the overhead pedestrian walkway. B oth streets are within a residential area. Parking was counted along bot h sides of Washing ton Avenue. Humphrey Street is a one -way street. The usag e rate for all parking observed was 26. 5%. Figure 65. Seymour Station Parking Parking at the closest lot (P58) had a utilization of 60.9% and downtown par king was 38.7%. On -street parking outside of the downtown had a utiliz ation of 17. 4%. The2001 station parking inventory, as part of the R ail Governance Study by CTD OT and conducted by Urbitran, listed utiliz ation at 72. 7%. The 2001 study examined the par king adjacent to the rail station. N am e Capacit y O ccupie d Ut ilizat ion P58 23 14 60.9% P59 29 7 24.1% P60 27 8 29.6% P61 64 27 42.2% P62 7 2 28.6% PCL _1 9 51 19 37.3% PCL _2 0 150 16 10.7% Tot al 351 93 26.5% Tabl e 38. Seymour Parking Utilization Park in g Area Own ers h ip Parking at the Main Street/B road Street and Main Street/Route 67 lot is owned by the State of Connecticut. The Town of Seymour owns the remaining parking around the station and all other lots and on- st reet parking inventoried. Fee Structure Parking at the Seymour Train Station and surrounding municipal lots is free. Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 51 Figure 66. Seymour Station Parking Map Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 52 3.2.5 Ansonia The City of Ansonia has 441 parking spaces available within half a mile of the station , which are open to the public without time restrictions. All parking is within parking lots and is mixed- use parking for the rail station and downtown. Fig ure 68 pro vides information reg arding parking areas. I n the direct vicinity of the train station there are 77 spaces available for surface parking plus three handicap spaces. Just south of the train station is a larg e municipal lot (P68) with 138 spaces, including six handicap spaces. There are two other municipal lots in D owntown Ansonia. The first lot is between Main Street and East Main Street by Maple Street (P74) with a capacity of 112, including five handicap spaces. The second lot is located on East Main Street (P73), behind City Hall. This lot has a capacity of 107, including six handicap spaces. Figure 67. Ansonia Station Parking The usag e rate for all parking observed was 41. 2%. The overall rate corresponds closely to the breakdown of parking utilization in the direct vicinity of the rail station (41.3%) and area lots (41.2%). The 2001 station parking inventory, as part of R ail Governance Study by CTD OT and conducted by Urbitran, listed utiliz ation at 68. 8%. The 2001 study only examined the parking in the direct vicinity of the station. N am e Capacit y O ccupie d Ut ilizat ion P68 138 25 18.1% P69 26 10 38.5% P70 10 0 0.0% P71 26 13 50.0% P72 5 3 60.0% P73 107 90 84.1% P74 112 32 28.6% P79 13 7 53.8% Tot al 437 180 41.2% Tabl e 39. Ansonia Parking Utilization Park in g Area Own ers h ip Parking adjacent to the tracks at the Ansonia R ail station is owned by the State of Connecticut. This accounts for approximately 45% of the parking directly at the train station. The Town of Ansonia owns the remaining parking around the station and all other lots inventoried. Fee Structure Parking at the Ansonia Rail Station and surrounding municipal lots is free. Ansonia Station Parking – Key Findings • Parking at the rail station is underutiliz ed. • Parking at the Ansonia Station has decreased slig htly since 2001. • All parking is free. • The majority of on -street parking in downtown Ansonia has time limits that prevent commuters from parking there. • The majority of parking around the station is owned by the municipality. Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 53 Figure 68. A nsoni a St at i on P arki ng M ap Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 54 3.2.6 Derby/Shelton The Cities of D erby and Shelton have 738 parking spaces available within half a mile of the Derby/Shelton Rail Station , which are open to the public without time restrictions. Parking is a mix of on -street , garage and surface parking lots and mixed- use pa rking is most prevalent for the rail station and downtown. Fig ure 70 provides information reg arding parking areas. I n the direct vicinity of the rail station there are 72 spaces available for surface parking plus five handicap spaces. Within a half mile there are two other surface parking lots, one parking g arag e and on- street parking available. The first lot is in De rby on Hallock Court (P77) with a capacity of 110. The second lot is located in Shelton at Canal Street West (P78). This lot has a capacity of 124, including ten handicap spaces. The D erby Municipal Parking Garage (P76) has a capacity of 310 spaces. On – street parking is available along both sides of Howe Avenue in Shelton and parking in D erby is restricted to two hours. Figure 69. Derby Station Parking The usag e rate for all parking observed was 44. 2%. The utiliz ation rate at the train station is 94. 8%, hig her than the averag e. The 2001 station parking inventory, as part of the R ail Governance Study by CTD OT and conducted by Urbitran, listed utilizatio n at 38. 7%, indicating that utiliz ation of the train station lot has increased. The 2001 study only examined the parking at the station lot. Parking in D erby had a hig her rate (45. 8%, than parking in Shelton (41%). The distributions of utiliz ation betwee n on -street, surface and garage is similar to the overall rate of 44.2% N am e Capacit y O ccupie d Ut ilizat ion P75 77 73 94.8% P76 310 140 45.2% P77 100 10 10.0% P78 124 49 39.5% PCL _2 6 12 5 41.7% PCL _2 7 5 2 40.0% PCL _2 8 10 0 0.0% PCL _2 9 9 7 77.8% PCL _3 0 18 11 61.1% PCL _3 1 15 14 93.3% PCL _3 2 13 0 0.0% PCL _3 3 8 3 37.5% PCL _3 4 21 5 23.8% PCL _3 5 16 7 43.8% Tot al 738 326 44.2% Tabl e 40. Derby Parking Utilization Park in g Area Own ers h ip Parking adjacent to the tracks at the D erby Train Station is owned by the State of Connecticut. D erby and Shelton own the remaining parking around the station and all other lots/g arag es inventoried. Fee Structure Parking at the D erby R ail Station is free. Parking at the D erby Municipal Garag e ranges from $2.50 for the first hour up to $10 for more than eig ht hours, monthly passes are available. The municipal surface lot at Hallock Court is free. All parking in Shelton is free. Derby Shelton Station Parking – Key Findings • Parking at the rail station is almost 100% utilized. • All parking in Shelton is free ; in D erby there is a cost for the municipal g arag e. Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 55 Figure 70. Derby/Shelton Station Parking Map Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 56 3.3 Parking Key Findings • The WB L has 557 parking spaces at it s six rail stations and an additional 5, 259 within half a mile of the stations. At the time o f inventory station parking utilization was 36.1% and all other was 33%. • The D erby/Shelton Station has the hig hest utiliz ation at the station, and Ansonia has the hig hest in the downtown. • B eacon Falls has the lowest utiliz ation at both the station and downtown. • All parking at the WB L stations is free; outside of the stations it varies by municipality. • Parking at many of the stations has increased since 2001. • The D erby/Shelton Station parking is shared with the DMV office parking resulting in almost 100% utiliz ation. Parking expansion at this location would be difficult. • Parking at most stations is underutiliz ed. • Seymour is the only station without a direct parking lot. • Station parking property at all locations is owned by the State of Connecticut . • The majority of on -street parking in downtown Seymour has time limits which would prevent commuters from parking there. • There is ample supply of parking in downtown Waterbury. • Parking ownership varies in Waterbury. The station parking is owned by the state, all on- st reet pa rking is owned by the municipality and parking g arag es/lots are owned by either Waterbury or private operators. Waterbury is the only one with pri vate parking . • Parking at the B eacon Falls Station has increased slig htly since 2001 but utiliz ation has decreased due to parking lot expansion. • I n downtown Naug atuck most parking is on street. Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 4. TRAVEL PATTERNS 4.1 Modal Split Modal split is a breakdown of the modes – single – occupancy vehicle, carpool, public transit, walk, bicycle, etc. – that workers use to travel to work each day. For home -based work trips, residents of the Study Corridor have a similar modal split to that of the overall state population ( Fig ure 71). While workers in the Study Corridor drive alone and carpool more than the state average, they also walk and take public transit less. While the Connecticut rate of driving alone to work is 7 8.3%, the corridor ra te ranges from 77.7% in D erby to 92.7% in Shelt on , for an average of 8 3.1%. The percentage of workers in Connecticut who ta ke public transit to work is 4 .8 %, a s comp ared to the corridor rate of 2.7 %. Only Waterbury, with 4. 3% of its workforce commuting via transit, comes close to the state rate. Figure 71. Mode Split for Commute to Work 4.2 Travel Time Travel time to work is the total number of minutes that it usually takes each individual to g o from home to work. Overall the commute to work time in the corridor is similar to the overall state distribution ( Fig ure 72). While the study corridor has a hig her percentag e of individuals with commute times less than ten minutes or greater than 60, the state has a greater percentage of mid -rang e time trips. The average commute time in the corridor , 25. 4 minutes, is slig htly lower than the state wide averag e of 25.6 minutes. The corridor average commute times rang e from 24. 1 minutes in Waterbury to 28 minutes in Seymour. Figure 72. Travel Time for Commute to Work 4.3 Journey to Work Journey to Work data refers to commuting patterns determined by workers’ home and work locations. When analyz ing this data, it is important to look both at the w ork locations of people who l ive in the Study Corridor a s well as the home locatio ns of people who work in the Study Corridor. B y looking at both of these aspects, a clearer understanding of travel patterns to, from, and within the study corridor emerg es. As shown in Table 43, in t erms of work locations of people who live in the s tudy corridor, in 2014 19.8% of study corridor residents worked in the same town in which they lived. While most of the communities in the study corridor have a large percentage of residents who live and work in the same community, the corridor is larg ely used for transportation to other employment centers within and outside of the study corridor. I n addition to those who live and work in the same community, 10.9% live and work within the seven corridor communities. Fig ure 73 shows the travel patterns of residents who live and work in the corridor and Table 41 presents the data in matr ix form. Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 58 Tabl e 41. Travel Patterns Within the Corridor Figure 73. Origin Destination Patterns Within Corridor Communities (Correlates with Tabl e 41) Outside of the corridor the next most common work places were New Haven County, Fairfield County and Hartford County, with 18. 8%, 10. 7%, and 8. 9% of study corridor residents working in each of thes e counties, respectively. The communities where the greatest percentag e of corridor residents who are employed outside of the study area are New Haven (4. 2%), B ridg eport (3. 9%), and New York City (3. 0%). I t is interesting to note that outside of Waterbury the greatest number of the city’ s residents work in New York City. As shown in Table 44, the home locations of people who worked in the Study Corridor in 2014 are similar to the work locations of Study Corridor residents at the time. The following categ ory’ s form Table 44: S ame Town, New Haven County, elsewhere in the Study Corridor, and Litchfield County accounted for 24. 1%, 19. 7%, 13. 3%, and 9. 4% of home locations for Stud y Corridor workers, respectively. Fig ure 74 shows the concentrations of where corridor employees live. Thirty -four percent of employees who work wit hin the corridor are residents and an additional 50. 9% live within 10 minutes of the corridor communities. The communities where employees who do not live in the corridor but work in it are B ridg eport (3. 7%) and New Haven (1. 7%). Corridor Community Commun ity W he re L ar gest % of Residents Work Outside of Corridor Waterbury New Yor k Ci ty N augat uck New Ha ven Be acon Falls New Ha ven Seymour New Ha ven Ansonia New Ha ven De rby New Ha ven She lt on Bri dgeport Tabl e 42. Top Municipality for Employment Outside the Study Corridor Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 59 Figure 74. Corridor Community Employees Place of Residence 4.4 Key Findings for Corridor • Among the WB L corridor communities , the number of workers g oing to New Haven (4,566) is greater than B ridg eport (4, 191). • Among those living in the WB L communities approximately 9, 300 work in either B ridg eport, Stamford or New York City. This indicates that approximately half of the passeng ers on the WB L may require a transfer ( Fig ure 75). • Approximately 3, 283 workers live in B ridg eport and work in one of the WB L corridor communities ; t his is double the number that live in New Haven but work along one of these corridors ( Fig ure 75). • • D erby and Shelton are adjacent communities but 77. 7% of D erby residents drive alone to work compared to the 92. 7% in Shelton. • WB L comm unities use public transportation less on average then the state to access work. • Waterbury has the hig hest rate of public transit users among st the WB L communities. • 19. 8% of study corridor residents worked in the same town in which they lived. • All commun ities except B eacon Falls, Ansonia and Derby have the greatest percentage of residents working in the community they reside in. The highest percentage of these residents are working in New Haven. • I n addition to those who live and work in the same community, 10. 9% live and work within the seven corridor communities. Figure 75. Corridor Flow Patterns Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 60 WORK LOCATION Sa me Study B r i d g eport New S ta mf ord Hartford Danbury NYC Ha r tfo rd NH Cty* Fa i rfield Li tchfield Cty CT O ther * W es tc hes ter NY O ther * M a s s a c hu s etts O ther * TO TAL Town Corridor* Ha ven Cty* Cty* Cty NY HOME TOWN Waterbury 14251 2469 561 1072 419 1240 956 1435 5509 8237 2383 3787 1375 208 598 341 696 45537 31.30% 5.42% 1.23% 2.35% 0.92% 2.72% 2.10% 3.15% 12.10% 18.09% 5.23% 8.32% 3.02% 0.46% 1.31% 0.75% 1.53% Naugatuck 1939 3077 375 647 182 455 453 411 1760 3487 1695 953 449 83 159 117 179 16421 11.81% 18.74% 2.28% 3.94% 1.11% 2.77% 2.76% 2.50% 10.72% 21.24% 10.32% 5.80% 2.73% 0.51% 0.97% 0.71% 1.09% Beacon Falls 111 769 66 160 41 99 72 71 262 770 451 124 94 12 27 22 46 3197 3.47% 24.05% 2.06% 5.00% 1.28% 3.10% 2.25% 2.22% 8.20% 24.09% 14.11% 3.88% 2.94% 0.38% 0.84% 0.69% 1.44% Seymour 869 1636 336 556 104 170 71 105 494 1781 1551 123 230 22 49 67 87 8251 10.53% 19.83% 4.07% 6.74% 1.26% 2.06% 0.86% 1.27% 5.99% 21.59% 18.80% 1.49% 2.79% 0.27% 0.59% 0.81% 1.05% Ans oni a 558 1965 416 720 141 187 84 114 555 2013 1535 101 285 28 58 66 88 8914 6.26% 22.04% 4.67% 8.08% 1.58% 2.10% 0.94% 1.28% 6.23% 22.58% 17.22% 1.13% 3.20% 0.31% 0.65% 0.74% 0.99% Der by 537 985 218 482 98 111 50 77 381 1275 960 71 190 20 36 42 75 5608 9.58% 17.56% 3.89% 8.59% 1.75% 1.98% 0.89% 1.37% 6.79% 22.74% 17.12% 1.27% 3.39% 0.36% 0.64% 0.75% 1.34% Shel ton 3214 961 2219 929 869 117 413 1020 600 2797 3024 133 3422 219 292 92 280 20601 15.60% 4.66% 10.77% 4.51% 4.22% 0.57% 2.00% 4.95% 2.91% 13.58% 14.68% 0.65% 16.61% 1.06% 1.42% 0.45% 1.36% TO TAL 21479 11862 4191 4566 1854 2379 2099 3233 9561 20360 11599 5292 6045 592 1219 747 1451 108529 19.79% 10.93% 3.86% 4.21% 1.71% 2.19% 1.93% 2.98% 8.81% 18.76% 10.69% 4.88% 5.57% 0.55% 1.12% 0.69% 1.34% Tabl e 43. Work Location of People Who Live in the Study Corridor, 2014 HOME LOCATION Sa me Study B r i d g eport New S ta mf ord Hartford Danbury NYC Ha r tfo rd NH Cty* Fa i rfield Li tchfield Cty CT O ther * W es tc hester NY O ther * Massachusetts O ther * TO TAL Town Corridor* Ha ven Cty* Cty* Cty NY WORK TOWN Waterbury 14251 2705 465 445 201 384 365 347 4460 8075 1481 6258 1758 111 318 354 456 42434 33.58% 6.37% 1.10% 1.05% 0.47% 0.90% 0.86% 0.82% 10.51% 19.03% 3.49% 14.75% 4.14% 0.26% 0.75% 0.83% 1.07% Naugatuck 1939 1859 108 90 32 35 83 53 622 1526 363 869 336 29 76 72 57 8149 23.79% 22.81% 1.33% 1.10% 0.39% 0.43% 1.02% 0.65% 7.63% 18.73% 4.45% 10.66% 4.12% 0.36% 0.93% 0.88% 0.70% Beacon Falls 111 261 5 7 4 3 8 0 48 220 37 57 26 1 8 4 5 805 13.79% 32.42% 0.62% 0.87% 0.50% 0.37% 0.99% 0.00% 5.96% 27.33% 4.60% 7.08% 3.23% 0.12% 0.99% 0.50% 0.62% Seymour 869 1254 124 117 13 10 53 30 196 1043 323 249 123 5 50 46 35 4540 19.14% 27.62% 2.73% 2.58% 0.29% 0.22% 1.17% 0.66% 4.32% 22.97% 7.11% 5.48% 2.71% 0.11% 1.10% 1.01% 0.77% Ans oni a 558 713 130 126 14 15 28 22 133 754 317 132 139 7 39 25 45 3197 17.45% 22.30% 4.07% 3.94% 0.44% 0.47% 0.88% 0.69% 4.16% 23.58% 9.92% 4.13% 4.35% 0.22% 1.22% 0.78% 1.41% Der by 537 1686 202 220 48 27 62 38 228 1275 477 225 170 14 64 24 53 5350 10.04% 31.51% 3.78% 4.11% 0.90% 0.50% 1.16% 0.71% 4.26% 23.83% 8.92% 4.21% 3.18% 0.26% 1.20% 0.45% 0.99% Shel ton 3214 3384 2249 574 392 256 351 247 1441 4661 5252 546 953 179 321 184 377 24581 13.08% 13.77% 9.15% 2.34% 1.59% 1.04% 1.43% 1.00% 5.86% 18.96% 21.37% 2.22% 3.88% 0.73% 1.31% 0.75% 1.53% TO TAL 21479 11862 3283 1579 704 730 950 737 7128 17554 8250 8336 3505 346 876 709 1028 89056 24.12% 13.32% 3.69% 1.77% 0.79% 0.82% 1.07% 0.83% 8.00% 19.71% 9.26% 9.36% 3.94% 0.39% 0.98% 0.80% 1.15% Tabl e 44. Home Location of People Who Work in the Study Corridor, 2014 Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 61 5. EXISTING ROAD NETWORK 5.1 Traffic Analysis Traffic volume data was g athered from existing sources to document the traffic patterns and flows in the study area. Several types of traffic volume data are typically analyzed. Averag e Annual D aily Traffic (AAD T) represents the total traffic flow in bot h directions on a roadway during an averag e day. AAD T includes the count of all vehicle types, including cars, trucks and buses , and is expressed in terms of vehicles per day (vpd). Since traffic fluctuates throug hout the day, studies often focus on the peak periods of traffic flow, which typically occur during the morning and afternoon commute hours. I n areas where there is sig nificant shopping traffic, the Saturday mid- day peak hour may also be critical. Peak hour volumes represent the hig hest overal l traffic flow actually observed during the peak period, and are expressed in terms of vehicles per hour (vph). D ata compiled for this study along R oute 8 includes AAD T’ s based on counts taken at permanent counting stations by the Connecticut D epartment of Transportation (CTD OT). The most recent data available on R oute 8 is for 2012, and is summariz ed in Fig ure 76. It shows that the highest overall traffic volumes are nearest to the Waterbury and B ridg eport City centers, which is typical due to the increased population density and commuting needs. As one moves farther from these cities, traffic volumes g radually decrease, with the lowest hig hway volume of 40, 000 vpd observed near the Seymour/B eacon Falls town line. Moving south from this point, the AAD T increases to 56,000 vpd crossing into Ansonia, 71, 000 vpd in D erby, 76, 000 vpd in Trumbull, and 104, 000 vpd in B ridg eport. Moving to the north, the AAD T increases to 59, 000 vpd in Naug atuck, and 62, 000 vpd in Waterbury. Figure 76. Route 8 ADT by Mile Post AAD T data was also compiled along R oute 34 (Main Street) in D erby between the R oute 8 interchang e and B ridg e Street (which connects D erby to Shelton) for the period between 2003 and 2012, and is presented in Table 45. The 2012 data shows AADT’s of approximately 12,000 vpd on B ridg e Street, west of the D erby downtown area. East of Bridge Street, the AADT is 17,200 vpd. Moving east throug h downtown, traffic feeds to and from the side streets (Elizabeth Street, Minerv a Street, Caroline Street, Water Street and Factory Street), and the AADT steadily increases to 22, 300 vpd just west of the R oute 8 interchang e. East of the interchang e, nearly twice as much daily traffic (44, 200 vpd) crosses the bridg e to and from Ea st D erby. Tabl e 45. Route 34 AADT 2003 2006 2009 2012 Route 34 wes t of SB Route 8 Ramps 21,30022,30021,90022,300 Route 34 eas t of Eliz abeth Street 18,30019,20019,20018,500 Route 34 wes t of Eliz abeth Street 16,50016,60017,40017,200 Route 34 northwes t of Bridge Street 11,80012,90013,10012,400 Bridge Street wes t of Route 34 13,50013,90013,20012,600 Annual Average Daily Traffic Volumes Route 34 Corridor Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 62 A compa rison of t he AAD T’ s from previous yea rs shows minor fluctuation in traffic patterns throug hout the period, and a fairly consis tent overall increase in traffic of between 3. 8% and 5% throug hout the corridor between 2003 and 2012. (The sole exception is a 3.7% decrease in traffic on the D erby/Shelton bridg e. ) This represents an annual g rowth factor of approximately 0. 75%, which i s fairly consistent with low g rowth rates seen throug hout Connecticut. Peak hour traffic counts were also provided along R oute 34 in D erby between B ridg e Street and the R oute 8 interchang e. The AM and PM Peak hour volumes are depicted in Fig ure 77. Figure 77 AM and PM Peak Hour Volumes Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 63 Traffic Key Find ing s • Overall increase in traffic of between 3. 8% and 5% throug hout the corridor between 2003 and 2012. • Exit 15 (Route 34 Main Street) off of R oute 8 sees hig h amounts of traffic either entering or exiting the expressway that ultimately cause delays on R oute 8. • Highest overall traffic volumes are nearest to the Waterbury and B ridg eport City centers. The morning peak hour traffic pattern shows approximately 800 vph travelling east on Main Street toward R oute 8. About 25% of this traffic comes over the Bridge Street bri dg e from Shelton. R oug hly one -third of this traffic enters R oute 8, and the remainder continues east on R oute 34. Westbound traffic flows on Main street number approximately 600 vph, with roug hly one -third exiting from R oute 8 and the remainder coming fr om the east on R oute 34. Nearly 40% of this traffic turns toward Shelton on B ridg e Street. I n addition, approximately 1, 100 vehicles exit R oute 8 and head east on R oute 34, and another 1, 100 vehicles enter R oute 8 from R oute 34 westbound during the morni ng peak hour. D uring the afternoon peak hour, there are approximately 800 vehicles travelling each way on Main Street between R oute 8 and B ridg e Street. B etween 35% and 40% of these vehicles turn to or from Shelton on B ridg e Street. At the Route 8 interc hang e, about one-fourth of the eastbound vehicles enter the hig hway. The remainder are joined by 1300 vehicles exiting R oute 8 to head east on R oute 34. Approximately 25% of the westbound traffic is from R oute 8. I n addition, approximately 1300 vehicles exit R oute 8 in an easterly direction on R oute 34, and nearly 900 vehicles enter the hig hway from R oute 34 from the east. Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 64 Figure 78 Trip Times for Route 8 5.2 Travel Times and Speeds 5.2.1 Highway As a first st ep to determine comparable travel times for the corridor using the hig hway system, sa mple travel time runs were conducted in the outbound and inbound directions along R oute 8 between the Waterbury Train Station and B ridg eport Train Station. I ntermediate times were taken along R oute 8 in the vicinity of the D erby, Ansonia, Seymour, B eacon Falls and Naug atuck train stations, as well. For Waterbury and B ridg eport, the times were recorded at the s tations themselves, and a time point was located at the hig hway entrance/exit. For the intermediate stations, a point along the hig hway was chosen in proximity to the station location. “D oor to door” times are therefore only calculated for the entire cor ridor; intermediate stations do not have time calculated for local roads. The measurements were taken using the “floating car” technique, where the test vehicle attempts to replicate the average (50 th percentile) speed by passing the same number of vehicles as the vehicles that pass the test car, thus placing the test vehicle in the center of the observed traffic. One early morning run was taken in each direction as traffic was building , and a se cond run was taken within the peak traffic flow period. A noontime run was taken in each direction to provide non- peak information, and then afternoon runs were taken as traffic built and during the peak period. A summary of the traffic data is reproduce d in Fig ure 78, and supports the following conclusions: D uring off -peak hours, the overall travel time of 31 Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 65 minutes outbound and 34 minutes inbound equates to a door -to -door travel speed of 58 mph (NB ) and 53 mph (SB ) between Waterbury and B ridg eport. I t was noted that the outbound direction experiences some delay between D erby and Ansonia and between B eacon Falls, Naug atuck and Waterbury. I nbound traffic maintains an operating speed of 60 mph or g reater all along R oute 8 during this off -peak period. D uring the morning commuter peak period, outbound delays occur between D erby and Ansonia, and ag ain between B eacon Falls and Naug atuck, resulting in an averag e operating speed of 57 mph and a travel time of 32 minutes. I nbound delays are sig nificant betwe en Seymour and D erby (throug h Ansonia) resulting in an averag e operating speed of less than 30 mph in that section of hig hway, and a door -to -door travel speed of 51 mph (36 minute travel time). D uring the afternoon peak commuter period, outbound dela ys oc cur from D erby, throug h Ansonia to Seymour, and ag ain from B eacon Falls throug h Naug atuck to Waterbury, resulting in an averag e travel speed of 50 mph and a travel time of 36 minutes. I nbound traffic experiences minor delays from Waterbury to Naug atuck, a nd more sig nificant delays from Seymour throug h Ansonia and D erby to B ridg eport. The door -to -door average speed is 55 mph, with a travel time of 33 minutes. However, this informtion did not reflect the more comprehensive data found in the National Performance Management Research Data Set (NPMRD S) data . This data was used to suppliment other data collected to better illustrate cong estion along the study corridor. Fig ure 79 and Fig ure 80 show a break down of traffic speeds throug hout the study corridor. The data represents traffic Figure 79 NP RDM S Dat a – AM Peak Travel Speeds Figure 80 NP RDM S Dat a – P M Peak Travel Speeds Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 66 seen in May of 2017, using Tuesday throug h Thrusday to display the most typical traffic speeds experienced corridor wide. Vehicles traveling south bound on R oute 8 during the morning peak see intermitten cong estion throug h Waterbury and Naug atuck and heavier cong estion throug h Seymour, Ansonia, D erby, and Shelton. Vehicles traveling northbound on R oute 8 during the morning peak see light intermitten cong estion throug hout the study corridor. Vehicles traveling nor thbound on R oute 8 during the afternoon peak see heavy cong estion throug h Shelton and D erby and becomes intermitten until Waterbury. Vehicles traveling southbound on R oute 8 during the afternoon peak see lig ht cong estion from Waterbury down to B eacon Falls with more moderate delays spiking in Seymour and at the D erby/Shelton town line. Hig h way Trav el Time K ey Fin d in g s • Vehicles traveling during off -peak hours experience operating speeds equal to or greater than posted speeds. • Heavy co ng estion during the morning peak can be seen while driving southbound from Seymour throug h Shelton and being heaviest throug h D erby. • Heavy cong estion during the afternoon peak can be seen while driving northbound throug h Shelton up to D erby. 5.2.2 Transi t To provide a better understanding of the travel times for the existing bus routes, schedule and General Transit Feed Specification (GTFS) data was analyz ed between major timepoints and compared to travel time observations (R ail travel times can be found in section 1.2). Travel time observations were taken while conducting ridership counts. The average weekday travel time and speed for each route analyz ed is presented in Table 46. Each route was then mapped and broken down into smaller sections and speed and on- time performance were analyzed. Fig ure 81 throug h Fig ure 92 show how each route was broken down and the scheduled distance, speed, and travel time for each. Overall the slowest seg ments of each route were found to be in the urban cores where the stop density was the hig hest and there were greater numbers of traff ic signals. Rout e One -w ay dist ance (mile s) Average one -way t rave l t ime (min) Avg speed (mph) Rout e 1 5 14.3 54 15.9 Route 22X 18.9 45 30.7 Rout e 2 3 12.7 46 16.6 Rout e 255 18.9 58 19.6 Rout e 229 24.4 76 19.1 Rout e T114 12.8 25 30.7 Rout e T7 4 8 .5 27.5 18.5 Rout e 4 0 2 .7 13 12.5 Rout e 4 2 4 .1 18.5 13.3 N1 9 .7 38 15.2 N2 3 .6 17.5 12.5 925/928 11 1 .5 10 9 .2 Tabl e 46. Fixed Route Travel time and Speeds On-time performance was analyz ed for both the inbound and outbound of each route by comparing the scheduled service times to the observed field time. Overall Waterbury routes were late but routes serving rail stations were on time . B ridg eport and New Haven routes were a lso late. Table 47 provides a summary of the results, route tables can be found in Appendix B. Rout e Me t O TP12 INBOUND Act ual Tr ave l Tim e (+L onge r , -Shor ter) O UTBO UN D Act ual Tr ave l Tim e (+L onge r , -Shor ter) Rout e 1 5 No 59(+3) 57 (+5) Route 22X No 49(+12) Round Tri p Rout e 2 3 No 53(+6) 47(+2) Rout e 255 No 56(+4) 64(+4) Rout e 229 No 89(+21) 80(+9) Rt. T114 Yes 54(+4) Round Tri p Rout e T7 4 No 26(+1) 27( -3) Rout e 4 0 Yes 13(+2) 16(+1) Rout e 4 2 Yes 14(+2) 16( -9) N1 Yes 44(+6) Round Tri p N2 Yes 18(+3) 14( -2) 925/928 — — — Tabl e 47. On -time Performance Summary Table 11 Between the Waterbury Green and Train S tation only 12 On -time performance is defined as leav ing a stop no more than 5 minutes past the scheduled time and zero minutes before the scheduled time Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 67 Route 15 The R oute 15 outbound travel time is 56 minutes, the inbound is 52. The averag e speed on the route is 15. 9 miles per hour. The seg ment with the slowest speed is in downtown B ridg eport between the B ridg eport Transportation Center and the intersection of A rctic Avenue and Seaview Avenue. A cross reference with stop spacing shows that this seg ment has the g reatest number of bus stops per mile. Figure 81. GBT Route 15 Schedule Travel Times On-time performance was calculated for t he route based on schedule time points during an AM trip. The field timed outbound travel time was 59 minutes, arriving at the D erby/Shelton station three minutes late but within the five minute buffer definition of on- time. I n the outbound, the route wa s considered on-time at all time points except the Arctic Avenue and Seaview Avenue schedule time point from which the vehicle departed 2 minutes early. The schedule has 4 minutes of layover time built into the D erby Train Station time point, which allowe d the route to depart for the inbound trip on time. The inbound trip took 57 minutes, resulting in the bus arriving 5 minutes late to the B ridg eport Transportation Center. The R oute 15 bus ran consistently behind schedule and did not meet the on- time performance parameter at the Artic Avenue and Enterprise Park scheduled stop. Route 22X The R oute 22X roundtrip travel time is 45 minutes. The averag e speed on the route is 30. 7 miles per hour. The seg ment with the hig hest speed is along R oute 8, and the slo west at the Shelton Corporate Park. Figure 82. GBT Route 15 Schedule Travel Times On-time performance was calculated for the route based on schedule time points during an AM trip. The field timed round trip travel time was 49 minutes, arriving back at the Derby Station twelve minutes late. The route was consistently late to each time point and on seg ments three, four and five did not meet on- time performances Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 68 parameters. The segment between the Corporate Drive schedule time point and the B ridg eport Avenue and Commerce D rive schedule time point had the slowest speed and resulted in the route falling behind schedule. The schedule has 28 minutes of layover time built into the B ridg eport Transportation Center, allowing it to leav e for the next trip on time. Route 23 The R oute 23 outbound travel time is 45 minutes, the inbound is 47. The averag e speed on the route is 16. 6 miles per hour. The seg ment with the slowest speed is between the B ridg eport Hospital and the intersection of B oston Avenue and B ruce Avenue. A cr oss reference with stop spacing shows that this seg ment has the g reatest number of bus stops per mile. Figure 83. GBT Route 23 Scheduled Travel Time On-time performance was calculated for the route based on schedule time points during a PM trip. The field timed outbound travel time was 47 minutes, arriving at the D erby/Shelton Station two minutes late but within the five minute buffer definition of on- time. I n the outbound, the route was considered on- time at all time points. The schedule has 2 -15 minutes of layover time built into the D erby/Shelton Station depending on the trip. The surveyed trip had two minutes of layover, leaving the station two minutes late. The inbound trip took 53 minutes, therefore being six minutes la te to the B ridg eport Transportation Center. The route was consistently behind schedule in the inbound but met all on -time performance parameters except at the Greater B ridg eport Transportation Center. Route 470 The travel time for the Route 470 to the Nau g atuck I ndustrial park varies g reatly between the morning and afternoon peak, most likely due to traffic in the PM. A round trip in the morning takes 55 minutes (30 minutes outbound, 25 inbound), but in the afternoon takes 85 minutes (45 minutes outbound, and 45 inbound), an additional 30 minutes long er. The g reatest difference in travel time between the peaks and timepoints is between the intersection of R oute 68 and Great Hill R oad and the Naug atuck Green. This trip takes approximately 3 -5 minutes in t he morning but 15 minutes in the afternoon. The averag e speed on the route in the morning is 18. 4 miles per hour and 11. 9 miles per hour in the afternoon. Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 69 Figure 84. C Tt ransi t Waterbury Route 470 Scheduled Travel Time On-time p erformance was calculated for the route based on schedule time points during an AM trip. The field timed outbound travel time was 27 minutes, arriving in Naug atuck one minute early, despite the route depart ing the Waterbury Green two minutes late. T he outbound route arrived early to all time points. The inbound trip took 26 minutes, therefore being one minute late to Waterbury. The route was consistently ahead of schedule in the inbound until the last time point where the travel time took twice as long as the scheduled time. Route 472 The R oute 472 outbound travel time is 20 minutes, the inbound is 15. The averag e speed on the route is 12. 5 miles per hour. The seg ment with the slowest speed is between downtown Naug atuck and the intersection of Route 63 a nd South Main Street. This section has the g reatest number of traffic sig nals per mile. Figure 85. C Tt ransi t Waterbury Route 472 Scheduled Travel Time On-time performance was calculated for the route based on schedule time points during an AM trip. The field timed outbound travel time was 14 minutes, arriving in Naug atuck two minutes early, despite the route depart ing the Waterbur y Green four minutes la te. The outbound route was considered on- time for all timepoints except at R oute 63/South Main St reet due to a detour from construction. The inbound trip took 18 minutes, therefore being three minutes late to Naug atuck. The route was on -time for all time points in the inbound. Route 471 The R oute 471 bus travels out to 550 Spring Street and back and then in a counter clockwise loop to the Mountain View shopping center. Overall the operating speed along the route is 15. 2 miles per hour and takes 38 minutes to complete. Travel out to 550 Spring Street and back takes 15 minutes and operates at an averag e speed of 15. 6 miles per hour. The loop out to the shopping center takes 23 minutes and has a slig htly lower operating speed of 14. 9 miles per hour. Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 70 Figu re 86. C Tt ransi t Waterbury Route 471 Scheduled Travel Time On-time performance was calculated for the route based on schedule time points during an AM trip. The field timed round trip travel time was 44 minutes, arriving back at t he Naug atuck Green six minutes late. The seg ment between the shopping plaz a and R ubber Avenue/Hoadley Street had the slowest speed and resulted in the route falling behind schedule. The route is interlined with the N2 and the schedule has five minutes of layover time built into the D owntown Naug atuck stop at R ubber Avenue & Church, allowing it to leave for the next trip on time. Route 479X The R oute 479X travel time in each direction is 25 minutes with an averag e speed of 30. 7 miles per hour. This route has minimal stops and operates along the R oute 8 corridor allowing it to travel at higher speeds. Figure 87. C Tt ransi t Waterbury Route 479X Scheduled Travel Time On-time performance was calculated for the route based on schedule time points during two A M trips. The field timed round trip travel time was 54 minutes, arriving at the Waterbury Green three minutes early. Route 441 The R oute 441 outbound travel time i s fifteen minutes, the inbound is eleven minutes. The averag e speed on the route is 13. 4 miles per hour. The seg ment with the slowest speed is outbound between the Naug atuck Community College and the Harold Leever Cancer Center. Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 71 Figure 88. C Tt ransi t Waterbury Route 441 Scheduled Travel Time On-time performance was calculated for the route based on schedule time points during an AM trip. The field timed outbound travel time was 25 minutes, arriving at the Wilkenda Avenue and Hig hland Avenue schedule time point one minute early. The outbound trip arrived on- time all time points. The inbound trip took thirteen minutes, therefore being two minutes late to the Waterbury Green. Route 42 The R oute 42 outbound travel t ime is 25 minutes, the inbound is twelve minutes. The averag e speed on the route is 12. 5 miles per hour. The seg ment with the slowest speed is between the Waterbury Station and the intersection of Hig hland Avenue and Sunnyside Avenue. Figure 89. C Tt ransi t Waterbury Route 42 Scheduled Travel Time On-time performance was calculated for the route based on schedule time points during a PM trip. The field timed outbound travel time was 16 minutes, arriving at the Harold Leever Ca ncer Center nine minutes early. D ue to layover time at the Harold Leever Cancer Cent er the route left on -time. T he outbound trip arrived on -time all time points. The inbound trip took 14 minutes, therefore being two minutes late to the Waterbury Green. Route 925/928 Express R oute 925 and 928 operate between Waterbury and Hartford with service to both the Waterbury Green and rail station. The averag e speed on the route between these two destinations is 9. 2 miles per hour. The seg ment heading towards the rail station has a hig her operating speed than towards the Green by 2. 7 miles per hour. On- time performance was not collected for this route. Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 72 Figure 90. Express Route 925/928 Scheduled Travel Time Between the Green and Waterbu ry Station Route 229 The R oute 229 travel time outbound varies between 72 and 76 minutes and in inbound between 76 and 86 minutes. The average speed on the route is 19.1 miles per hour. The seg ment with the slowest speed is between Union Station and the Ne w Haven Green. This segment experiences hig h traffic volumes and has several traffic sig na ls. On -time performance was calculated for the route based on schedule time points during an AM trip. The field timed outbound travel time was 80 minutes, nine minut es long er than the scheduled time. The route departed the New Haven Green four minutes late and arrived in Waterbury at the green eleven minutes late. While the schedule appears to have 15 minutes of layover time in Waterbury, the route utiliz es six mi nutes of this time to chang e direction via Grand and State Streets. I n the outbound the route arrived late to all time points, if the route had left the New Haven Green on -time it would have only arrived late to the Cheshire Town Hall, I -84 commuter lot a nd Waterbury Green. Construction in Cheshire may be responsible for late arrivals. The inbound trip took 89 minutes, 21 minutes long er than the schedule time. The route did leave the Waterbury Green nine minutes late due to a late arrival and heavy board ing s. I n the inbound the route arrived late to all time points, if the route had left the Waterbury Green on- time it would have arrived at most stops 2 -6 minutes late and at the New Haven Green and Union Station over ten minutes late. Figure 91. C Tt ransi t New Haven Route 229 Scheduled Travel Time Route 254 The Route 254 average travel time in each direction is 58 minutes. The average speed on the route is 19.6 miles per hour. The seg ment with the slowest speed is between St . R a phael and the intersection of West Chapel and Ella Gra sso B oulevard . A cross reference with stop spacing shows that this seg ment has the g reatest number of bus st ops per mile. Exis tin g Co n d itio n s 73 Figure 92. C Tt ransi t New Haven Route 255 Scheduled Trave l Ti me On-time performance was calculated for the route based on schedule time points during an AM trip. The field timed outbound travel time was 56 minutes, four minutes long er than the scheduled time. The route arrived in Ansonia at the R ail Station nine minut es late and then at the Seymour rail station four minutes late. The bus arrived at all stops before Ansonia between two and five minutes early. There are four minutes of layover time built into the schedule in Seymour allowing the route to depart on time for the inbound trip. I n the outbound the route arrived at several timepoints early. The inbound trip took 64 minutes, four minutes long er than the schedule time. I n the inbound, the route arrived on- time to all timepoints. Tran s it Trav el Time K ey F indings • R outes which operate on R oute 8 have the hig hest operating speed, approximately 30 mph. • New Haven routes had the hig hest operating speed a mong st t hose that did not operate on the hig hway. • The g reater the stop density, the slower the route segment w a s. • Travel between D erby/Shelton and B ridg eport via bus t a kes 46 -54 minutes depending on the route ; t his is twice as long as via train. • Travel between Waterbury and New Haven takes 58 minutes via bus ; via rail it t a kes 81 minut es.