1 Central Naugatuck Valley Metropolitan Planning Organization FFY 2018 – 2021 Transportation Improvement Program Prepared by: Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments in cooperation with the Connecticut Department of Transportation Endorsed: June 9, 2017 Revised to include Addendum: Performance – Based Planning and Programming : June 8, 2018 2 Central Naugatuck Valley Metropolitan Planning Organization Chief Elected Officials: Municipality Chief Elected Official Title Town of Beacon Falls Chris topher Bielik First Selectman Town of Bethlehem Le o n ard Assard First Selectman City of Bristol Ken Cockayne Mayor Town of Cheshire Rob Oris, Jr. Town Council Chair Town of Middlebury Edward B. St. John First Selectman Borough of Naugatuck N. Warren “Pete” Hess Mayor Town of Oxford George R. Temple First Selectman Town of Plymouth David V. Merchant Mayor Town of Prospect Robert J. Chatfield Mayor Town of Southbury Jeff Manville First Selectman Town of Thomaston Ed mond V. Mone First Selectman City of Waterbury Neil M. O’Leary Mayor Town of Watertown Thomas L. Winn Town Council Chair Town of Wolcott Thomas G. Dunn Mayor Town of Woodbury William J. Butterly, Jr. First Selectman 3 T able of Contents Abstract ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. 4 Public Comment and Outreach ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………… 5 Public Comment Period: ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. …………….. 5 Public Information Meetings: ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ……… 5 Sources of Copies: ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. …………………….. 5 Adopted Resolutions ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. …………. 6 Overview ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ……………………….. 19 Section 1: MPO Organization ………………………….. ………………………….. …………………………. 20 Memoranda of Understanding ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ….. 20 Project Movement within the Adopted TIP ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………….. 20 Air Quality Planning and Conformity Efforts ………………………….. ………………………….. …………………. 20 Transportation Planning and Funding in the Hartford and Bridgeport/Stamford Urbanized Areas . 21 Coordination of Transportation Planning Activities in the Multi – State Metropolitan Region ……….. 21 Section 2: TIP Development Process ………………………….. ………………………….. ……………….. 22 Section 3: Air Quality Conformity Process ………………………….. ………………………….. ………… 24 Conformity ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. .. 24 Ozone Nonattainment Areas ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. …….. 24 PM 2.5 Attainment Maintenance Area ………………………….. ………………………….. …………………….. 29 Section 4: Financial Assessment ………………………….. ………………………….. ……………………… 32 Section 5: Public Involvement ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………… 34 Section 6: FHWA Projects ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ….. 35 Section 7: FTA Projects ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. …….. 48 Performance – Based Planning and Programming ………………………….. ………………………….. … 54 Highway Safety ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………. 54 Transit ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ……… 55 Pavement and Bridge Condition ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. … 56 System Reliability ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. …………………… 56 Freight Movement ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………….. 57 Air Quality ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. ………………………….. … 57 4 Abstract The FFY 2018 – 20 21 TIP contains a listing of all proposed transportation improvement projects programmed to receive federal financial assistance from the US D O T over the next four years. The TIP includes an overvi ew that describes the organization of the MPO . It also describes the TIP development process, the project selection procedures, and the results of the regional air quality impact assessment. The TIP is organized by federal aid transportation programs admin istered by Federal Highway FHWA and FTA. The public was provided an opportunity to review the TIP and offer comments. Efforts were made to ensure low income and minority groups were notified about the draft TIP and afforded an opportunit y to participate in the process. 5 Public Comment and Outreach Public Comment Period: June 1 , 201 7 – June 30 , 201 7 Public Information Meetings: 1. Friday, June 9, 2017 at 10:00 AM at Central Naugatuck Valley MPO meeting, Conference Room, NVCOG, Waterbury, CT 2. Tues day, June 20 , 201 7 at 5:00 PM at Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments , Waterbury, CT Sources of Copies: Mark C. Nielsen , Deputy Director /Director of Planning Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments 49 Leavenworth Street , 3 rd Floor Waterbury , Connecticut 06702 Web site: nvcogct .org E – mail: TIPComments @ nvcogct .org Phone: (203) 757 – 0535 6 Adopted Resolutions 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Overview The Central Naugatuck Valley Metropolitan Planning Organization ( CNV MPO ) Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) lists all highway and transit improvement projects within the Central Naugatuck Valley planning region programmed to receive federal assistance over the next four federal fiscal years, beginning October 1, 201 7 (FFY 201 8) and ending September 30, 2021 (FFY 20 21 ). The TIP is incorporated into the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP), and is collectively referred to as the TIP/STIP. The CNV MPO is authorized by federal regulations and designated by the Govern or to conduct transportation planning and endorse a TIP/STIP for that portion of the Bridgeport – Stamford , Waterbury, New Haven, and Hartford Urbanized Area s covered by the Central Naugatuck Valley planning regions. Federal transportation planning regulatio ns, as amended, stipulate who selects projects under the various funding categories. Federal regulations require the TIP/STIP to be “financially constrained.” This means there must be a reasonable expectation of federal financial assistance to implement en dorsed projects and that the funding sources must be identified for each project. The MPO endorsed the FFY 20 15 – 20 18 TIP on October 10, 2014 . It has been subsequently amended over the intervening years to advance priority projects and maintain a fi nancially constrained TIP/STIP. The FFY 201 8 – 20 21 TIP is organized by federal funding category and federal fiscal year. Project descriptions, cost estimates and schedules are provided for each project. Annual financial plans were developed that provide an estimate of total funding requirements and reflect anticipated federal funds. The TIP Includes:  MPO organization and TIP requirements;  Summary of Transportation Planning Process Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs);  TIP development, project selection and deve lopment process;  Air quality assessment and regional air quality emission analysis results of TIP;  Air quality conformity determination (Ozone and PM2.5);  Public involvement activities and public comments;  Project descriptions, cost estimates and programmi ng schedule by FHWA and FTA funding category; and  Financial assessment. 20 Section 1: MPO Organization Membership of the CNVMPO includes the Chief Elected Officials of the ten municipalities of the Central Naugatuck Valley planning region. The 15 MPO municipa lities are:  Town of Beacon Falls  Town of Bethlehem  City of Bristol  Town of Cheshire  Town of Middlebury  Borough of Naugatuck  Town of Oxford  Town of Plymouth  Town of Prospect  Town of Southbury  Town of Thomaston  City of Waterbury  Town of Watertown  Town of Wolcott  Town of Woodbury Representatives of the FHWA, FTA, C T DOT, and the CT D E EP are included as “Ex Officio” members. The NVCOG serve s as the transportation planning agency of the MPO and conduct s the transportation planning process for the planning region in accordance with the federal planning requirements. Memoranda of Understanding The transportation planning process in the implicated u rbani zed a rea s is carried out through cooperative relationships between area municipalities, regional planning organizations, regional transit operators, state transportation agency, state air agency, and federal transportation. Agreements have been made betwee n participants to define roles and responsibilities and formalize actions. The following are the Memoranda of Understanding that guide transportation planning in the CNVMPO planning region : Project Movement within the Adopted TIP The CT DOT and MPO established an agreement to expedite the selection and movement of projects within the endorsed State and MPO TIPs (STIP/TIP). The MOU established an administrative process for endorsing these types of changes and provides flexibility in adjusting the STIP /TIP without the need for a formal amendment . Air Quality Planning and Conformity Efforts The MPO and the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) developed a letter of understanding to define roles and responsibilities for air quality planning, particularly as it pertains to the development of transportation control measures (TCMs) and the State Implementation Plan for Air Quality (SIP). 21 Transportation Planning and Funding in the Hartford and Bridgeport/Stamford Urbanized Area s This MOU was developed by the MPOs designated in the Bridgeport – Stamford and Hartford urban area s to guide how funds allocated under the STP urban program would be divided among the MPOs. The CNVMPO includes municipalities included in both urbanized areas. Distribution is based primarily on the total population in each urban planning region relative to its share of the combine population of all urban planning regions. The transportation funds from the FHWA (PL) and FTA (Section 5303) are passed through the C T DOT based on the fairshare population formula to the urban regional planning organizations of the urbanized area. Each year, C T DOT will determine the federal funding available to the Bridgeport – Stamford urbanized area and calculate regional fairshare app ortionments based on the method described above. Coordination of Transportation Planning Activities i n the Multi – Sta te Metropolitan Region The NVCOG is a party to a multi – state MOU with the New York Metropolitan Transportation Council (NYMTC) and the Orang e County Transportation Council (OCTC) in the State of New York, the North Jersey Transportation Planning Authority (NJTPA) in the State of New Jersey , the Western Connecticut Council of Governments (WestCOG), Connecticut Metro Council of Governments (METR OCOG), Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments (NVCOG), South Central Regional Council of Governments (SCRCOG), and Lower Connecticut River Valley Council of Governments (RiverCOG) in the State of Connecticut, and the Lehigh Valley Planning Commission (LVP C) in the State of Pennsylvania to perform in good faith the activities of voluntary coordination, cooperation and consultation amongst themselves . The intent of the MOU is to c ooperate in efforts toward achieving, wherever possible, general consistency of planning products, analyses and tools through informal communication and document exchange . 22 Section 2: TIP Development Process The TIP is prepared by the NVCOG in collaboration with C TDOT . The MPO selects highway projects for the attributable portion of F HWA’s Surface Transportation Block Grant Program ( STPH, STPBS, STPNH and STP Anywhere ) , as well as, local transit projects under the FTA’s Section 5307 capital formula grant program. The C T DOT submits a list of proposed projects allocated to the other fede ral – aid programs. The MPO evaluates the draft State TIP (STIP) and incorporates its program into the MPO TIP. Projects proposed for federal – aid funding under the STP are required to follow a prescribed scoping, evaluation and development process. Project p roposals must complete all aspects of the process before they can be initiated and included in the TIP. To set priorities for locally initiated projects, the CNVMPO established regional goal s and objectives in its long – range transportation plan that reflec t the goals of MAP – 21: G oal To develop and maintain an effi cient transportation system that will provide the public with a high level of mobility, safety, and choice, while also addressing social, economic, and environmental needs and concerns. Objectives 1. To provide a transportation system that reinforces and compliments the regional plan of conservation and development and the land use planning objectives of the region’s 1 5 municipalities. 2. To maintain and im prove the region’s highway sys tem with an emphasis on making better use of exist ing transportation facilities while seeking to improve safet y and security and reducing traffi c congestion, energy consumption, and motor vehicle emission s. 3. To maintain and improve public transportation servic e to provide a choice of travel modes, reduce high way congestion, improve effi ciency, and provide mobility for people who are transit dependent. 4. To provide transportation services to expand employment opportunities. 5. To provide transportation services re sponsive to the elderly and persons with disabilities. 6. To plan and program transportation improvements according to existing and realistic future funding. 7. To support strong, sustainable, and livable communities. 8. To provide “walkable communities,” especi ally in downtown centers and in congested areas, connecting these areas with commuter parking lots, residential areas, schools, commercial and industrial corridors, and recreation areas. 23 9. To increase the safety and security of the transportation system for motorized and non – motorized users. In 2013, the Connecticut state legislature created the Local Transportation Capital Improvement Program or LOTCIP. The new program provides state funds to urbanized planning areas in lieu of the federal transportation f unds allocated under the Surface Transportation Block Grant (STBG) Program for urbanized areas. The C T DOT implemented the program and developed guidelines and procedures for selecting projects. While the LOTCIP provides an alternate funding source for loca l transportation projects, federal guidelines still require the CNVMPO and C TD OT to collaborate on project selection and evaluation under the ST BG . Projects included in the TIP must address the issues and be consistent with the objectives contained in the CNVMPO long range transportation plans (LRTP) T DOT’s capital plan. Project selection is based on a thorough evaluation of project purpose and needs. The availability of federal financial assistance, the cost of the proposed improvement, a nd the ability of the project sponsor to finance and complete its share of the project are also considered in setting regional priorities. A financial plan and activity schedule is established for each federal fiscal year. This financial plan establishes t he priorities for each funding category. Projects are intended to meet the following criteria:  Address a transportation deficiency;  Improve the movement of people and goods;  Adequately mitigate the transportation deficiency;  Minimize adverse environmental and social impacts; and  Is it cost effective. All projects contained in the TIP are consistent with the LRTP for the Central Naugatuck Valley p lanning r egion and the state – wide long range transportation plan. 24 Section 3: Air Quality Conformity Process Confo rmity The Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 and the federal transportation regulations and legislation r ecognized the major contributions of transportation sources to the overall air quality problem evidenced throughout the country. To effectuate a reduction in transportation – related emissions and a corresponding improvement in air quality, areas designated as non – attainment or maintenance for a criterion pollutant are required to demonstrate that their transportation plans, programs and projects contribute to the attainment of National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) and will not cause a new violation or delay attainment of the NAAQS . This process is referred to as Air Quality Conformity . The CNVMPO is required to assess the air quality impacts of its transportation plans, program and projects and certify that its transportation process is in conformity with the CAAA . The Connecticut Department of Transportation is responsible for conducting the air quality emissions analyses for the metropolitan planning organizations in Connecticut. The CTDOT uses the statewide travel demand model to estimate vehicle m iles of travel for various classes of highways and during various time periods. The future transportation network includes all planned improvement projects and is based on the complete implementation of the transportation improvement program (TIP) and the long range transportation plans. Ozone N onattainment Area s Connecticut is divided into two non – attainment area for the 8 – hour ozone NAAQS , both are classified as “Moderate” non – attainment areas . Fairfield, New Haven and Middlesex counties are included as p art of the New York – Northern New Jersey – Long Island non – attainment area. The remainder of the state is designated as the Greater Connecticut non – attainment area. Because parts of the CNVMPO planning area are located in both non – attainment areas, a conformi ty determination is required for both non – attainment areas. In June, 2004, the EPA finalized the 8 – hour standards for ozone non – attainment areas and the designated the Connecticut portion of the New York – Northern New Jersey – Long Island non – attainment area as a “moderate” non – attainment area for the 8 – hour Ozone NAAQS . Subsequent decisions by the EPA , and based on revisions to the approach for classifying non – attainment areas , re – designated both of Connecticut’s non – attainment area s as a “marginal” non – attai nment area with an attainment date of December 31, 2015. Based on 2012 – to – 2014 air quality data, the EPA determined that Connecticut’s non – attainment areas did not attain ozone standards by the July 20, 2015 deadline . Both the Greater Connecticut and the New York – New Jersey – Long Island areas were reclassified as “Moderate,” effective June 3, 2016 , with t he new attainment date set for these two areas a s July 20, 2018. The MOVES2014a emissions model is used to calculate emissions from transportation travel a nd establish ozone emissions budgets. The 8 – hour budgets were developed jointly by CTDOT and CTDEEP. The budgets were found to be adequate by EPA and can be used in comparing future transportation – related emission to determine conformity. 25 The conformity te st requires the emissions from the future transportation system to be less than the EPA – approved budgets for all analysis years. The emissions analyses were conducted for the following years: 2018 – New attainment year and near term analysis year 2025 – Interim modeling year 2035 – Interim modeling year 2040 – Long range transportation plan horizon year The results of the quantitative emis sions analys e s conducted by CT DOT are shown in the following tables and the analysis year trends are depicted in the charts following the tables. CENTRAL NAUGATUCK VALLEY PLANNING REGION 2015 – 2040 LONG RANGE TRANSPORTATION PLAN REGION EMISSIONS ANALYSIS RESULTS 8 – Hour Ozone NAAQS Connecticut Portion of the NY – NJ – LI – CT Area VOC Emission Analysis NO X Emission Analysis Analysis Year Action SIP Budget Difference Action SIP Budget Difference 2018 Emissions 16.56 27.40 – 10.84 22.39 54.60 – 32.21 2025 Emissions 12.33 27.40 – 15.07 13.26 54.60 – 41.34 2035 Emissions 7.26 27.40 – 20.14 7.86 54.60 – 46.74 2040 Emissions 6.68 27.40 – 20.72 7.35 54.60 – 47.25 1. A small reduction in VMT and emissions in the Greater Connecticut area will occur from the ECO program in the Connecticut portion of the NY – NJ – LI area due to travel between the areas. 2. VOC & NOx emissions are in tons per summer day and are calculated using Connecticut’s vehicle mix. 3. HMPS 14 Functional Class system used. 4. National Low Emission Vehicle (NLEV) program included in 2008 and future years. 5. Eight Hour Ozone emission budgets ef fective June 27, 2008. 6. Series 31C with 20 iterations equilibrium assignment. 26 051015202530 2018 2025 2035 2040Estimated VOC Emissions by Analysis Year Compared to Approved EPA Budget CT Portion of NY – NJ – LI – CT Non – Attainment Area Estimated VOC emissions (Tons/Day) EPA VOC Budget (Tons/Day) 0102030405060 2018 2025 2035 2040Estimated NOx Emissions by Analysis Year Compared to Approved EPA Budget CT Portion of NY – NJ – LI – CT Non – Attainment Area Estimated NOx Emissions (Tons/Day) EPA NOx Budget (Tons/Day) 27 CENTRAL NAUGATUCK VALLEY PLANNING REGION 2015 – 2040 LONG RANGE TRANSPORTATION PLAN REGION EMISSIONS ANALYSIS RESULTS 8 – Hour Ozone NAAQS Greater Connecticut Non – Attainment Area VOC Emission Analysis NO X Emission Analysis Analysis Year Action SIP Budget Difference Action SIP Budget Difference 201 8 Emissions 15. 07 26.3 0 – 1 1 . 23 19 . 74 49.2 0 – 29 . 46 2025 Emissions 11.3 8 26.3 0 – 14.9 2 11.8 6 49.2 0 – 37.3 4 2035 Emissions 6. 65 26.3 0 – 19.6 5 6.9 1 49.2 0 – 42 . 29 2040 Emissions 6.1 5 26.3 0 – 20.1 5 6.4 8 49.2 0 – 42.7 2 1. A small reduction in VMT and emissions in the Greater Connecticut area will occur from the ECO program in the Connecticut portion of the NY – NJ – LI area due to travel between the areas. 2. VOC & NOx emissions are in tons per summer day and are calculated using Connecticut’s vehicle mix. 3. HMPS 14 Functional Class system used. 4. National Low Emission Vehicle (NLEV) program included in 2008 and future years. 5. Eight Hour Ozone emission budgets effective June 27, 2008. 6. Series 31C with 20 iterations equilibrium assignment. 28 051015202530 2018 2025 2035 2040Estimated VOC Emissions by Analysis Year Compared to Approved EPA Budget Greater CT Non – Attainment Area Estimated VOC emissions (Tons/Day) EPA VOC Budget (Tons/Day) 0102030405060 2018 2025 2035 2040Estimated NOx Emissions by Analysis Year Compared to Approved EPA Budget Greater CT Non – Attainment Area Estimated NOx Emissions (Tons/Day) EPA NOx Budget (Tons/Day) 29 PM 2.5 Attainment Maintenance Area The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for fine particulate matter in 1997. Fine particulate matter is referred to as PM2.5 and is a mixture of microscopic solids and suspended liquid solids in the air. It is formed directly as a by – product of combustion, such as smoke or automobile exhaust, or indirectly from chemical reactions in the atmosphere. Fairfield and New Haven Counties are included in the New York – New Jersey – Connecticut (NY – NJ – CT) P M2.5 non – attainment area. On April 1 7 , 200 7 the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (CTDEEP) submitted a r evision to the State Implementation Plan to establish interim progress for achieving the NAAQS for fine particulate matter a nd motor vehicle emission budgets. The annual emission budgets for the Connecticut portion of the NY – NJ – CT non – attainment area were determined to be adequate and are used in future analysis years. The EPA has also determined Connecticut’s PM2.5 attainment demonstration SIP to be administratively and technically complete as of January 8, 2009. Effective October 24, 2013, the Connecticut portion of the multi – state PM2.5 non – attainment area was re – designated as “attainment maintenance.” EPA’s guidance for main tenance plans calls for a demonstration of continued compliance by showing that future emissions during the maintenance period will not exceed the level of emission in the attainment inventory. The end of the maintenance period is 2025. The MOVES2010b emis sions model is used to establish emissions budgets for the 2017 and 2025 analysis years. Emission estimates were developed for each scenario year using MOVES2014a for direct PM2.5 and indirect PM2.5 emissions based on the estimate of NOx emissions, the mos t critical precursor of PM2.5. The conformity test requires the emissions from the future transportation system expected to be in place in 2017 to be less than the EPA – approved budget for 2017 and the emissions from the 2025 build scenario and subsequent y ears to be less than the 2025 budget. The emissions analyses were conducted for the following years: 2013 – Attainment year 2017 – Motor Vehicle Emissions Budget year 2025 – Motor Vehicle Emissions Budget year; End maintenance period 2035 – Interim modelin g year 2040 – Long range transportation plan horizon year The results of the quantitative emis sions analysis conducted by CT DOT are shown i n the following table and the analysis year trends are depicted in the charts following the table. 30 CENTRAL NAUGATUCK VALLEY PLANNING REGION 2015 – 2040 LONG RANGE TRANSPORTATION PLAN REGION EMISSIONS ANALYSIS RESULTS Fine Particulate Matter (PM 2.5 ) Annual NAAQS Connecticut Portion of the NY – NJ – LI – CT Area Direct PM 2.5 Emission Analysis NO x Emission Analysis Analysis Year Action SIP Budget Difference Action SIP Budget Difference 2018 Emissions 284.10 575.80 – 291.70 7,192.70 12,791.80 – 5,599.10 2025 Emissions 202.30 516.00 – 313.70 4,361.80 9,728.10 – 5,366.30 2035 Emissions 154.40 516.00 – 361.60 2,726.30 9,728.10 – 7,001.80 204 0 Emissions 144.60 516.00 – 371.40 2,572.00 9,728.10 – 7,156.10 31 0.00100.00200.00300.00400.00500.00600.00700.00 2018 2025 2035 2040Estimated Direct PM 2.5 Emissions by Analysis Year Compared to Approved EPA Budget CT Portion of the NY – NJ – LI – CT Attainment/Maintenance Area Estimated Direct PM 2.5 Emissions (Tons/Year) SIP Budget (Tons/Year) 0.002,000.004,000.006,000.008,000.0010,000.0012,000.0014,000.00 2018 2025 2035 2040Estimated NOx (Indirect) Emissions by Analysis Year Compared to Approved EPA Budget CT Portion of the NY – NJ – LI – CT Attainment/Maintenance Area Estimated Nox (Indirect) Emissions (Tons/Year) SIP Budget (Tons/Year) 32 Section 4: Financial Assessment The FFY 201 8 – 2021 TIP is financially constrained to the c ongressional authorized amounts for the programs governed by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and the Federal Transit Administration (FTA). Non – federal matching funds will be provided by the State of Connecticut through the Connecticut Department of Transportation and by the sponsoring municipalities of the Central Naugatuck Valley planning r egion . The TIP is expected to require about $ 1,098.9 million to implement over the next four years. This funding requirement includes regional (specific projec ts located in one of the fifteen municipalities in the Central Naugatuck Valley MPO area) and statewide and multi – region projects. These latter projects involve actions that will be implemented in either CTDOT Maintenance and Construction District 1 or 4, bot h of which overlap the MPO area . The funding requirements for the statewide and district projects are included for information purposes only. These funds are not included in the MPO TIP financial plan because they are shown in other regional TIPs and ar e only included in the financial plan for the State TIP (STIP). For projects specific to the Central Naugatuck Valley r egion , the funding requirement for the next four years totals about $ 3 83 . 0 million. The US Department of Transportation will provide abou t 75.7% of the funds required to implement the MPO TIP projects, with the state contributing 23.9% . Local sources of funds are expected to provide less than 0. 4 % of the total cost to implement region – based projects. Federal sources are estimated to accumulate to about $289.8 million and the state will provide $ 9 1.5 million. Approximately $1.7 million will come from local sources. The vast majority of federal funds are allocated to state roads and facilities where the State is responsible for the non – federal matching funds . Since its inception, l ocal projects are primarily being completed with 100% State funds under the LOTCIP. Because local projects are sorted into the LOTCIP, there are very few locally sponsored projects in the TIP , and therefore local funds account for only a small portion of spending in the TIP. About 91.9 % of the total cost of the MPO’s transportation improvement program is targeted at highway a nd road projects with about 8.1 % of the funds used to support various transit projects. Highway improvement projects are estimated to cost about $ 352.1 million, with $ 28 9.8 million allocated from various FHWA programs. This represents roughly 82.3 % of the financial requirement for highway projects . The only t ransit – related line items allocated directly to the planning region are for CT t ransit bus operations and will require about $ 30.9 million to implement. These projects will be 100% state funded. The funding requirements to implement the projects listed in the TIP are provided from reasonably expected public resources. The federal funds identified in the TIP are a portion of the total expected authorization to the State of Connecticut. When these funds are summed with all other expected federal funds shown in the TIPs of the other Connecticut MPOs and the rural regions of Connecticut, as shown in the STIP, the total equals the expected federal authorization to the State of Connecticut. C T DOT and the MPO have concurred in the use of these federal funds for the projects listed in the FFY 201 8 – 20 21 TIP/STIP. 33 The majority of the federal funds in the TIP will be matched by State resources. The C T DOT has committed to use Connecticut Special Transportation Fund (STF) resources for this purpose. The STF was established in 1983 by the Connecticut State Legislature to finance the State’s share of the Transportation Infrastructure Renewal Program. This fund is required to pay the operating expenses of the C T DOT, the 100% State funded infrastructure improvement projects, and the interest and principal from the sale of bonds. Connecticut uses proceeds from the sale of bonds to match expected federal funds. The sale of bonds has consistently been at a level sufficient t o match all available federal funds. The principal sources of STF revenues are the motor fuel tax and motor vehicle receipts, which combined account for about 80% of the total fund revenues. State resources are sufficiently available to match the federal f unds allocated to TIP/STIP projects. Past experience of Connecticut’s performance in financing the Transportation Infrastructure Renewal Program supports this conclusion, as all available federal funds have been matched during that period. Local resources provided by the municipalities composing the CNVMPO will also be used to match federal funds to the extent necessary. These local revenues will contribute less than ½ a percent of the non – federal match. Where local funds are indicated in the TIP, the munic ipality or sponsoring entity has made a financial commitment to provide the necessary project funds for the match of federal dollars. The commitment of local match of federal funds is a condition for project endorsement by the MPO and must be authorized by a municipal resolution before a project is added to the TIP. The TIP, and the STIP, of which the TIP is a component, is financially constrained and the spending plan is based on reasonable projections of available statewide and local resources. As project , program and schedule changes are made to the TIP, the total expected federal authorizations and matching funds will be re – allocated to reflect total statewide and regional program needs. 34 Section 5: Public Involvement The draft FFY 201 8 – 20 21 TIP was made available to the public for review and comment. A 30 – day review and comment period was provided, beginning on June 1 , 201 7 with a posting on both the NVCOG website and ending on June 30 , 201 7 . A legal notice was published in the Republican American (Water bury area newspaper) in the June 1 , 201 7 edition . In an effort to expand public outreach to Spanish speaking residents, a legal notice was also published in the weekly Spanish newspaper , La Voz Hispana De Connecticut , June 1 , 2017 . The draft list of pro jects was posted on the website of the N VCOG and the public was requested to offer comments. Public information meetings were held concerning the draft STIP/TIP:  Friday, June 9 th at 10:00 AM during the CNVMPO meeting in the conference room of the NVCOG, Th ird Floor, 49 Leavenworth Street, Waterbury.  Tuesday, June 20 th , at 5:00 PM in the conference room of the N VCOG, Third Floor, 49 Leavenworth Street , Waterbury. For the public information meeting on June 20 th , NVCOG and C T DOT staffs were available at 4:30 P M to informally discuss any aspects relating to the draft TIP/STIP and any other transportation issues and concerns. Comments received at the meetings were recorded and staff responded to comments, as needed. The public review and comment period informati on meetings also served as the notice for related air quality assessments. The C T DOT conducted the regional emissions analyses for Ozone and Fine Particulate Matter (PM2.5) and the results were incorporated into the TIP/STIP. The public was also provided a n opportunity to comment on the draft TIP and air quality conformity determinations at the meeting of the Central Naugatuck Valley MPO held on June 9, 2017 . The Chair asked if there was anyone from the public present at the meeting that wanted to comment. Hearing none, the CNVMPO moved to endorse the air quality conformity statements and draft TIP , contingent on completing the public comment period and during which no major adverse comments were received . 35 Section 6: FHWA Projects 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 Section 7: FTA Projects 49 50 51 52 53 Central Naugatuck Valley Metropolitan Planning Organization FFY 2018 – 2021 Transportation Improvement Program Addendum: Performance – Based Planning and Programming Prepared by: Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments in cooperation with the Connecticut Department of Transportation Endorsed June 8 , 2018 54 Performance – Based Planning and Programming The Statewide and Nonmetropolitan Transportation Planning and Metropolitan Transpor tation Planning, published on May 27, 2016, (FHWA 23 CFR Parts 450 and 771 and FTA 49 CFR Part 613) implements changes to the planning process, including requiring a performance – based approach to planning and requires that the Connecticut Department of Tra nsportation (CTDOT), Central Naugatuck Valley Metropolitan Planning Organization ( CNVMPO ), and the operators of public transportation use performance measures to document expectations for future performance. Performance management and performance – based pla nning and programming increases the accountability and transparency of the Federal – aid Program and offers a framework to support improved investment decision – making by focusing on performance outcomes for national transportation goals. FHWA and FTA establi shed national performance measures in areas such as safety, infrastructure condition, congestion, system reliability, emissions, freight movement, transit safety and transit state of good repair. As part of this new performance – based approach, recipients o f Federal – aid highway program funds and Federal transit funds are required to link the investment priorities contained in the Statewide Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) and Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) to achievement of performance tar gets. The MAP – 21 performance – related provisions also require States, MPOs, and operators of public transportation to develop other performance – based plans and processes or add new requirements on existing performance – based plans and processes. These perfor mance – based plans and processes include the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement (CMAQ) Program performance plan, the Strategic Highway Safety Plan, the public transportation agency safety plan, the highway and transit asset management plans, and the State Freight Plan. A STIP and TIP shall include, to the maximum extent practicable, a discussion of the anticipated effect of the STIP and TIP toward achieving the performance targets identified by the State in the statewide transportation plan or other State performance – based plan(s), linking investment priorities to those performance targets . All current targets set for the performance measures listed below can be accessed at the CTDOT website at www.ct.gov/dot/performancemeasures . Highway Safety Highway Safety is determined by the interaction between drivers, their behavior and the highway infrastructure. The five (5) performance measures for Highway Safety include: (1) the number of fatalities; (2) the rate of fatalities; (3) the number of seriou s injuries; (4) the rate of serious injuries; and, (5) the number of non – motorized fatalities and serious injuries. The STIP and the TIP will program projects to meet the targets set by the CTDOT and agreed upon by the CNVMPO by including appropriate Highw ay Safety Improvement Program (HSIP) safety projects: 55 1. Programmatic highway safety improvements : Projects or programs that are conducted regularly throughout the state such as signing and pavement marking programs. 2. Programmatic driver safety activities : Projects or programs that are conducted regularly on an ongoing basis. These include Highway Safety behavioral programs such as Impaired Driving, Occupant Protection, Distracted Driving, Speeding, Motorcycle Safety, and Teen Driving grants for State and Mu nicipal Police Departments using National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) funds. 3. Location – specific highway safety projects : This includes roadway safety improvements selected to correct known safety problems at locations with a high frequenc y or severity of crashes. Transit The Transit Asset Management (TAM) rule requires that recipients and sub recipients of Federal Transit Administration (FTA) funds set annual performance targets for federally established State of Good Repair (SGR) measures . Performance targets will be set for one or more asset classes for the following asset categories : Rolling Stock, Equipment, Facilities and Guideway Infrastructure. CTDOT identified asset classes for its transit service providers specific to each of the f our assets categories in the three public transportation modes of rail, bus and ferry. The percentage of assets beyond the useful life benchmark is the performance measure set for both the categories of Rolling Stock and Equipment. For the facilities categ ory, the performance measure is based on a 5 – point condition rating scale derived from FTA’s Transit Economic Requirement Model (TERM). The performance measure is the percentage of facilities rated below 3 on the 5 – point scale, with a 3 rated as SGR. The c ategory of facilities has two classes which are passenger and parking stations and administrative and maintenance buildings. Under FTA reporting requirements, the guideway Infrastructure category is specific only to rail. The performance measure set by FTA is the percentage of guideway with a performance restriction , whic h is interpreted as slow zones. Under the FAST Act and MAP – 21, “transit providers are required to submit an annual narrative report to the National Transit Database that provides a descript ion of any change in the condition of its transit system from the previous year and describes the progress made during the year to meet the targets previously set for that year.” Beginning in October 2018, performance targets will be reported annually to t he National Transit Database by CTDOT for the transit system. A narrative report describing strategies for setting targets and progress on the targets will accompany targets starting 2019. The STIP and TIP will program projects to meet the targets set by t he CTDOT and agreed upon by the CNVMPO by utilizing the list of capital prioritized projects, based on projected asset conditions, included in the CTDOT TAM and Transit Group Plans to be completed by October 1, 20 18 to be shared with the MPOs. This list of projects will be updated every four years along with the Plans. These prioritized projects will be developed with the aid of CTDOT’s analytical decision support tool, Transit Asset Prioritization Tool, better known as TAPT. 56 Pavement and Bridge Condition The four performance measures for Pavement condition include (1) the percent of the Interstate system in Good, (2) the percent of the Interstate system in Poor condition, (3) the percent of the non – Interstate National Highway System (NHS) in Good, and (4) the percent of the non – Interstate NHS in p oor condition. The two performance measures for Bridge condition include (1) the percent of NHS Bridges in G ood , and (2) the percent of NHS Bridges in Poor condition. The STIP and the TIP will program projects to m eet the targets set by the CTDOT and agreed upon by the CNVMPO using the Department’s Pavement Management System and the Bridge Management System , which uses a systematic look at conditions to develop optimal strategies. These strategies are included in th e CTDOT Transportation Asset Management Plan (TAMP). Transportation Asset Management Plan : TAMP acts as a focal point for information about the assets, their management strategies, long – term expenditure forecasts, and business management processes. CTDOT is required to develop a risk – based TAMP for the NHS to improve or preserve the condition of the assets and the performance of the system (23 U.S.C. 119(e) (1), MAP – 21 § 1106). MAP – 21 defines asset management as a strategic and systematic process of operat ing, maintaining, and improving physical assets, with a focus on engineering and economic analysis based upon quality information, to identify a structured sequence of maintenance, preservation, repair, rehabilitation, and replacement actions that will ach ieve and sustain a desired state of good repair over the lifecycle of the assets at minimum practicable cost. (23 U.S.C. 101(a) (2), MAP – 21 § 1103). Pavement and Bridge State of Good Repair needs are identified, quantified, and priori tized through the TAMP process. Projects to address SOGR repair needs are selected from the TAMP for inclusion in the STIP and TIPs. System Reliability Highway travel time reliability is closely related to congestion and is greatly influenced by the complex interactions of traf fic demand, physical capacity, and roadway “events.” 1 Travel time reliability is a significant aspect of tran sportation system performance. The national system reliability performance measures assess the impact of the CTDOT’s various programs on the mobili ty of the transportation highway system users. Operational – improvement, capacity – expansion, and to a certain degree highway road and bridge condition improvement projects, impact both congestion and system reliability . Demand – management initiatives a lso im pact system reliability. According to the SHRP – 2 study, Analytical Procedures for Determining the Impacts of Reliability Mitigation Strategies , “travel – time reliability is a new concept to which much of the transportation profession has had only limited exposure.” 2 1 SHRP 2 Project L03, “Analytical Procedures for Determining the Impacts of Reliability Mitigation Strategies,” September 2011, p. ES – 7, on the World Wide Web at http://onlinepu bs.trb.org/onlinepubs/shrp2/L35RFP/L03Report.pdf (accessed May 14, 2018) 2 Ibid, p. 1 – 1. 57 Although there is not a specific system reliability program, reducing congestion and improving system reliability are key factors considered when CTDOT makes decisions about investments in the transportation system. The CTDOT and the CNVMPO wil l program projects in the STIP and TIP to meet the targets set by the CTDOT and agreed upon by the CNVMPO by considering system reliability in the projects that are selected. Over time, and as quantifiable impacts begin to be observed and measured, they ca n be expected to become part of the project selection process in a formal way. Freight Movement This measure considers factors that are unique to the trucking industry . The unusual characteristics of truck freight include:  use of the system during all hour s of the day  high percentage of travel in off – peak periods  need for shippers and receivers to factor in more ‘buffer’ time into their logistics planning for on – ti me arrivals. [23 CFR 490.607]. Freight movement will be assessed by the Truck Travel Time Reli ability (TTTR) index. For the first reporting period, Connecticut will be using the analysis conducted as part of the truck freight bottleneck analysis that was done as part of the freight plan, and which was approved by FHWA. Going forward, Connecticut, a long with other State DOTs and MPOs have the data they need in FHWA’s National Performance Management Research Data Set (NPMRDS), which includes truck travel times for the full Interstate System. Therefore, for this first year of reporting, the CTDOT and C NVMPO must use the trend and truck bottleneck analysis done for the recently completed Statewide Freight Plan. Air Quality US DOT requires that states and MPO’s assess the impact of their transportation systems on air quality and specifically the imp acts ve hicle exhaust emissions. Their performance measure for air quality is based on an assessment of projects selected for funding under the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement (CMAQ) program . The CMAQ program’s purpose is to fund transportation p rojects or programs that contribute to the attainment or maintenance of National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) in those specific areas. The STIP and the TIP will program projects to meet the targets set by the CTDOT and agreed upon by the CNVMPO by selecting appropriate CMAQ eligible projects including: congestion reduction and traffic flow improvements; ridesharing; transit improvements; travel demand management; and, bicycle and pedestrian facilities.