2023-2045 MTP

About the Metropolitan Transportation Plan (MTP)  

As the council of governments for 19 towns and a Metropolitan Planning Organization, the Naugatuck Valley Council of Governments (NVCOG) is in the process of updating our long-range transportation plan. This Metropolitan Transportation Plan (MTP) was originally developed in 2019 and identifies transportation deficiencies, recommends improvements, and advances priority transportation projects, in cooperation with CTDOT, municipal officials, and other organizations and interested citizens. View the approved and adopted 2019-2045 plan here.

Updating our Plan

With an expected adoption in 2023, the updated MTP provides the region with an opportunity to examine both the present state of our transportation plan and share a vision for getting around the Naugatuck Valley in the future.  

We want your feedback!

In the coming months, NVCOG will open a survey to residents, visitors, and those with an interest in transportation in the region. We will also be holding traditional public information meetings, sharing updates on our website, NVCOG’s Facebook, Twitter, and seeking input through an interactive map.   

Transportation in our Region:

Staff Contact

Rich Donovan
Transportation Planner
rdonovan@nvcogct.gov
(203) 489-0361

84 New Mix

Discussions have begun on a long-term plan for the I-84 & Route 8 “Mixmaster” interchange.  CTDOT and HNTB corporation gave a presentation to local leaders on June 30th which included a brief history of the “Mixmaster”, what has been completed thus far, the analysis of options moving forward and how the public will be involved.

View The New Mix PowerPoint presentation or watch a recording of this presentation on the NVCOG YouTube Channel.

CTDOT has launched the New Mix program’s website which can be viewed at https://www.newmixwaterbury.com/

On the New Mix website, you will be able to learn about the very early planning process for the New Mix program; as the New Mix program progresses, the website will be updated to keep you informed.

The New Mix website features a form where anyone can ask a question or leave a comment. Please feel free to leave a comment or ask a question anytime at https://bit.ly/NewMixComments!

 

Staff Contact: 

Mark Nielsen
Director of Planning/Assistant Director
mnielsen@nvcogct.gov

HydroLand Kinneytown Dam Fish Passage

An ineffective fish ladder at Kinneytown Dam in Seymour, owned by HydroLand, is currently preventing migratory fish from accessing miles of restored habitat upstream. NVCOG has joined the Naugatuck River Restoration Coalition with the goal of returning migratory fish to the Naugatuck River by ensuring that safe, timely and effective fish passage is established at Kinneytown Dam. The Coalition has developed an Interactive Story Map to explain the issue. 

Kinneytown Dam and Fish Ladder
Kinneytown Dam and Fish Ladder, Seymour, CT

As a hydroelectric generating facility, Kinneytown Dam is regulated by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC).  As part of the facility’s license exemption, Hydroland must provide for safe, timely and effective fish passage at the dam.  FERC opened a docket in Fall of 2020 in response to a letter from the US Fish and Wildlife Service documenting inadequate fish passage at the facility.  NVCOG is participating in the docket to ensure that regional and municipal voices are heard by regulators. 

On September 30, 2021, NVCOG, Save the Sound and the Naugatuck River Revival Group jointly took formal legal action asking FERC to revoke the License Exemption held by Hydroland for Kinneytown Dam. A Press Release explained the filing.  

Hydroland, HydroLand, HydroLand Omega, Hydroland Inc, Hydroland Corp, Hydroland Corporation, 

Explore the Issue:

This interactive storymap details the effort to restore migratory fish to the Naugatuck River, and the current issues at Kinneytown Dam keeping fish from miles of restored habitat upstream.

More Information:

Let the Naugatuck River Run Silver Again Op-Ed by John Waldman published in Hearst Media publications 12/4/2020

 

Staff Contact:

Aaron Budris
Senior Regional Planner
abudris@nvcogct.gov

Regional Hazard Mitigation Plan Update

The final Regional Hazard Mitigation Plan and Municipal Annexes have been posted to the NVCOG Hazard Mitigation Plan webpageThe Plan has been adopted by all 19 NVCOG Communities, and the NVCOG Board endorsed the plan on December 10, 2021.  FEMA approved the plan in January, 2022.  

In 2019, NVCOG received funding from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to conduct a multi-jurisdictional Natural Hazard Mitigation Plan (NHMP) for all 19 NVCOG municipalities. 

An approved NHMP is required by FEMA to qualify a municipality for certain federal mitigation funding. NHMPs must be updated every 5 years. The purpose of this project is to update municipal NHMPs and develop a consolidated multijurisdictional plan for the entire Naugatuck Valley planning region in compliance with FEMA standards and requirements that will serve as the approved NHMP for each NVCOG municipality. 

Naugatuck River flooding in 1955

The NHMP will identify natural hazards and risks, existing capabilities, and activities that can be undertaken by a community to prevent loss of life and reduce property damages associated with the identified hazards. Public safety and property loss reduction are the driving forces behind this plan. Careful consideration will also be given to the preservation of history, culture and the natural environment of the region. 

Milone & MacBroom Inc. (MMI) was selected to serve as the project consultant. MMI has extensive experience developing NHMPs in the region and across the state.  NVCOG is administering the project and has prepared a detailed scope of work in collaboration with MMI. The project is expected to take 18 months and will include extensive public and stakeholder outreach and coordination with various municipal officials and departments.

Interactive Storymap:  

Click on the tabs at the top of the Project Storymap and scroll through the narrative to learn about hazards impacting the region and view topical maps.

Meetings and Workshops:

Public Information Meeting 8/4/2021
Recording
 
Public Workshop #2: Mitigation 
Recording
Slides
 
Coordinator Workshop #2: Mitigation
Recording
Slides
 
Public Workshop #1: Risk 
Slides
 
Coordinator Workshop #1: Risk
Recording 
Breakout Room Recording
Slides
 
Project Kickoff Meeting
Slides

Upcoming Meetings:

There are no upcoming events at this time.

View Full Calendar

Staff Contact:  

Aaron Budris
Senior Regional Planner
abudris@nvcogct.gov

COVID-19 Information

Image of virus molecules

During this time of uncertainty, NVCOG seeks to provide the best information available for the residents of our nineteen communities. 

On this page, you can find links with information related to COVID-19 pandemic for:

  • Bus Transit, Commuter Rail, and Highway Updates
  • Resources for Businesses
  • Latest Press Releases and Executive Orders from Governor Lamont
  • Local Health Districts
  • Your Municipality’s COVID-19 Response web page
  • Federal Departments and Agencies

NVCOG Current Status

Employees are back in the office and our office is open to the public. Public information meetings encourage in-person participation and will continue to have a virtual option for participation.

Information Sources

Below are links to trusted agencies with status updates, resources for municipalities and businesses, and the best data on how to prevent coming into contact with the virus and what to do if you do come into contact with the virus.

Connecticut Coronavirus Call Center: 2-1-1
Please contact 211CT if in need of food, mental health, transportation or many other services.

Click on a heading below for the resources NVCOG has compiled.

Bristol-Burlington Health District (Bristol)

Chesprocott Health District (Cheshire, Prospect & Wolcott)

Naugatuck Valley Health District (Ansonia, Beacon Falls, Derby, Naugatuck, Seymour & Shelton)

Housatonic Valley Health District (Oxford, Southbury & Woodbury)

Torrington Area Health District (Bethlehem, Middlebury, Plymouth, Thomaston & Watertown)

Waterbury Department of Public Health

Emergency Orders issued by the Governor and State Agencies

Executive Order No 700 “Protection of Public Health and Safety during COVID-19 Pandemic and Response – Procedures for Local Appointments and Elections Requiring In-Person Vote”

Governor Lamont’s Press Releases

Connecticut COVID-19 Data Tracker

Find a Test Center Near You including No-Cost COVID-19 Test Sites

Department of Public Health (DPH) resources

Department of Housing (DOH) Housing Notices and Orders regarding COVID-19

Connecticut State Department of Education Supporting Student Participation

Department of Social Services for SNAP and Child Support Services

Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) resources for social distancing at state parks, beaches and more.

CT State Library for updates on local libraries.

Connecticut COVID-19 Charity Connection (4-CT) was launched as a non-profit that unites donors with state-wide programs that will help make an immediate impact.

Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental Relations (ACIR) news and resources

Connecticut Conference of Municipalities (CCM) resources

Connecticut Council of Small Towns (COST) news and updates

Municipal Guidance Document #1 “Suspension of In Person Open Meeting Requirements”

Municipal Guidance Document #4 “Suspension of Tax Deadlines and Collection Efforts”

Municipal Guidance Document #5 “Suspension of In-Person Voting Requirements by the Public in the Municipal Budget Process”

Municipal Guidance Document #8 Index of Executive Orders Pertinent to Municipalities

The Federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act (CARES Act) includes funds for Connecticut governments to pay costs incurred in responding to the COVID-19 pandemic. The Office of Policy and Management (OPM) has established the Municipal Coronavirus Relief Fund (CRF) Program to reimburse municipalities for such costs.

Rules on Use, Allowable Costs & Ineligible Costs and Program Overview

Program Forms, Fact Sheets, and Application Portal

CT DECD – Stop the Spread in English and Spanish.

CT CBIA – Reopen Connecticut resources and materials.

CDC – Print Resources web page with information covering a variety of topics.

Watch live updates on global and national counts of COVID-19 by Johns Hopkins University

Also see state-by-state testing trends by Johns Hopkins University.

Waterbury West Main Street Corridor Study

West Main Street going east facing the Green

Project Overview

NVCOG is leading the West Main Street Corridor Study in coordination with the City of Waterbury and the CT Department of Transportation. The purpose of the study is to develop an in depth understanding of the challenges and opportunities of this stretch of road from Route 8 to the Waterbury Green and develop solutions that improve safety for all users including pedestrians, cyclists, public transit riders, and drivers.

Map of Project Area

Project Details

West Main Street is a short corridor in an urbanized area that sees significant use. The block-by-block street character varies significantly ranging between two and six lanes. The street includes a variety of land uses, a railroad bridge, an incomplete sidewalk network, some on-street parking, several signalized intersections, and several difficult pedestrian crossings. It’s an important corridor that serves as a primary surface street connection across the Naugatuck River into downtown Waterbury. The street also connects several regionally significant employers and destinations, including UConn Waterbury, Waterbury Hospital, St. Mary’s Hospital, the Basilica, and several other large religious establishments, as well as the Waterbury YMCA, the Mattatuck Museum, several state offices, and the seat of local government.

Overall, the purpose of this study is to develop a conceptual plan and recommendations for the corridor that will address safety and traffic flow concerns while providing for improved pedestrian, bicycle, and transit-user accessibility.

We will examine the impacts of reducing lane widths in certain sections of this corridor, also known as a “road diet” to accommodate increased pedestrian space, safer crossings, and appropriate transit stops and flows including the potential for a bus-only lane or a shared bus lane.

The final product will be a full study of our findings along with several conceptual drawings detailing what improvements are needed to create a safer environment for all users, better traffic flow and encourage economic development.

Fuss and O’Neill is the primary consultant leading the study. Currently, we are in the “Existing Conditions” phase of the project, collecting data and community input to learn as much as we can about the challenges and opportunities of this corridor.

Community Input

We are actively seeking community input for how we can better accommodate walkers, transit riders, cyclists, drivers and parking along West Main Street. There are still ways you can provide us with your input:

  1. Please take our survey in English or Español.
  2. Try using our interactive map feature on the West Main Street website where you pinpoint areas of concern. 

Public Meeting Dates

Our final public meeting was held on Wednesday, October 27th. We held our first virtual public meeting on Tuesday, January 12, 2021 from 5-7 pm.  Check out our website to watch the presentation or review meeting notes. We held our 2nd virtual public meeting on Wednesday, April 14th from 5-7 pm. 

The final public meeting recording can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZCqSpfDaDiU

Our 3rd Project Advisory Committee Meeting took place on Tuesday, September 28th. The slides from this meeting can be found here: 

PAC Meeting

Staff Contact:

Josh Lecar
Assistant Planning Director
jlecar@nvcogct.gov

Regional Plan of Conservation and Development

Though there are legal reasons to write a Plan of Conservation and Development (POCD), we think the practical ones are far more important. Learn more about POCD’s through the questions and answers below:

What is your current Regional Plan of Conservation and Development?

Current regional planning work is being guided by the three POCD’s from the three regional planning agencies which consolidated as the NVCOG in 2015: the Valley Council of Governments, the Council of Governments of the Central Naugatuck Valley, and the Central Connecticut Regional Planning Agency.

What is a Regional Plan of Conservation and Development? 

The Regional Plan of Conservation and Development (POCD) is the NVCOG’s advisory policy document on the future physical development of the region. The POCD addresses planning issues which transcend municipal boundaries, such as water supply, economy, housing and transportation, presents a metropolitan perspective, and recommends general policies that will guide the NVCOG region’s residents and decision makers in responding to future change. 

Why prepare a regional POCD? 

Legal reason: State Statute 8-35a mandates that regional council of governments prepare such a plan at least once every ten years. 

Practical reason: We live in a regional community. Each city and town in the NVCOG region relies on each other for employment, housing, retail, healthcare, and other services and needs. The regional POCD provides planning linkages between towns and cities and offers policies to more efficiently coordinate development to improve its residents’ quality of life. 

How will the Plan be used? 

The Plan will guide NVCOG in setting priorities, reviewing state, regional and local proposals, implementing programs, and assisting member communities. 

Relationship between Local, Regional and State Plans? 

LOCAL: Each municipality in the region has a local POCD. These plans address local issues and are connected to local zoning codes.

STATE: At the State level, its POCD is much broader in scope. State POCD recommendations guide major state initiatives and local and regional projects involving state funding in excess of $200,000.

REGIONAL: The Regional Plan falls between the two, more specific than the State Plan and more general than the local plans. Furthermore, State statutes require a review of consistency between a municipal plan and regional and state POCD’s. Because the municipal plan is connected to zoning, it is typically the most influential. For this reason, the Regional POCD places a great deal of emphasis on local plans and zoning. 

When will you update the POCD? 

The NVCOG staff and Regional Planning Commission is currently in the process of reviewing the three regional POCD’s to create one new NVCOG POCD.  Please check back to this page for NVCOG POCD progress updates and latest drafts. 

I want to tell you what I think about the Regional POCD’s! 

And we want to hear from you! We are in the process of creating an online survey and setting a schedule for public workshops and informational meetings 

Staff Contact:  

Joanna Rogalski
Senior Regional Planner
jrogalski@nvcogct.gov

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Waterbury Mad River

River and Building

Project Type: Clean up

NVCOG oversaw a $500,000 grant for assessment and remediation across multiple parcels on behalf of the Waterbury Development Corporation (WDC). The remaining funds were allocated to conduct clean-up activities at Lot 19, where Brass City Harvest has constructed a regional food hub for cleaning and preparing locally-grown foods for distribution.

Project Status: Remediation activities have been completed.

Waterbury Industrial Commons

Building and Sky

Project Type: Clean-up and Assessment

Activities: Phase II Environmental Site Assessment and Hazardous Building Materials Assessment at former Jo-Vek portion. Clean-up funding awarded at Lots 10 and 11.

NVCOG’s Revolving Loan Fund Committee awarded the City of Waterbury $173,000 to continue project work at Waterbury Industrial Commons (WIC). WIC is a testament to the City of Waterbury’s commitment to supporting advanced manufacturing and well-paying jobs in the region. The undertaking has leveraged tens of millions from the Department of Defense and private investment.

An NVCOG EPA Revolving Loan Fund grant targeted cleanup of contaminated soils. NVCOG conducted a Phase II Environmental Site Assessment at the former Jo-Vek portion of the Waterbury Industrial Commons Campus.

Project Status: Lot 10 Phase II Environmental Site Assessment in draft. Remediation funding awarded – development of  subaward agreement between NVCOG and Waterbury Development Corporation in progress.

Waterbury 909 Bank Street

Sidewalk and trees

Project Type: Cleanup

Activities: Environmental Site Assessments and Remediation

NVCOG conducted an environmental assessment in order to facilitate potential site transfer. The property is currently vacant. Assessment work was funded by EPA petroleum funds through NVCOG’s FY2016 EPA Assessment grant, as approved by the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection and by U.S. EPA Region 1.

The City of Waterbury was granted a $220,000 sub-awarded through NVCOG’s Revolving Loan Fund for remedial activities throughout the site. 

Project Status: Phase I and Phase II Environmental Site Assessment reports complete. Remedial activities have been completed. Groundwater monitoring is currently taking place.