Composter & Rain Barrel Sale

Rain Barrel and Composter available in the sale

NVCOG is excited to offer area residents discounted rain barrels, composters, and accessories at our Spring 2021 sale.

In order to reduce shipping costs and offer the lowest possible prices, all items purchased from this online store must be picked up on Saturday, June 19, 2021. The online store will close on June 17th.

When placing your order below, you may choose one of the following times and locations to pick up your items:

1. Between the hours of 9:00 AM and 11:00 AM at Cheshire Town Hall, 84 South Main Street, Cheshire
 
2. Between the hours of 1:00 PM and 3:00 PM at the Southbury Parks and Recreation Department, 561 Main Street South, Southbury
 
The composter will be 33 inches tall by 33 inches wide once constructed. It comes in three pieces to easily fit in your vehicle. The rain barrel is 35 inches tall by 31 inches wide. It comes as one piece but still fits into a backseat of a sedan.
 
Please be sure you pick up your order, or send someone in your place, as we have very limited storage space. Unclaimed products will be donated to a local community garden program. We suggest planning your pick-up knowing that the rain barrel comes fully assembled and the composter comes in three pieces.
 
Directions for where to pick up your order can be found at the bottom of this page.  Any questions can be directed to compostersale@nvcogct.gov or call 203-489-0366.  
 
Happy Composting and Rainwater Harvesting!

Why Compost?

Organic materials are highly recyclable and should be thought of as a resource, not a waste. The goal of this program is to raise public awareness of composting at home and the benefits of using compost to reduce our waste footprint and help improve or maintain high-quality soil.

Composting kitchen food scraps and yard trimmings at home, and leaving grass clippings on the lawn, can reduce the volume of garbage you generate by as much as 25%!  Composting recycles organic waste into a usable product right in your own backyard. By adding compost to your gardens and lawns, you can conserve water, grow healthy plants, reduce the use of fertilizer and pesticides, and protect the environment.  Removing these materials from your regular trash collection also helps divert waste away from landfilling and waste to energy. A major benefit to composting is that you are helping your city or town reduce their disposal costs by reducing the amount of garbage being generated.  

Want to Learn More?

We hosted a virtual composting workshop led by a UConn Master Composter and you can watch the recording on the NVCOG YouTube Channel.

Resources provided from the composting workshop:

A Beginner’s Guide to Composting

UConn: 104 Items You Can Compost

Composting Questions Answered

Why Use a Rain Barrel?

Rain barrelCollecting and using rainwater for outdoor use saves energy, helps conserve drinking water, and reduces stormwater runoff.

The treatment and delivery of public drinking water are expensive and energy-intensive. Public water supplies and private well water are limited resources that can be depleted. Using collected rainwater for watering lawns, gardens, and potted plants and for washing off patio furniture and tools can reduce the economic and environmental impact of water treatment and delivery and helps keep water in reservoirs and aquifers for when it is needed most.

Collecting rainwater also helps reduce stormwater runoff that can transport many pollutants to our local waterways and cause erosion. From a gardening perspective, rainwater is better for plants than most tap water because it does not contain chlorine or fluoride. Water collected in rain barrels should not be used to drink or bathe and rain barrels should be emptied and stored throughout the winter months. 

Pick-Up Locations

Cheshire Town Hall
84 South Main Street, Cheshire

Southbury Parks and Recreation Department
561 Main Street South, Southbury

Any questions can be directed to compostersale@nvcogct.gov or call 203-489-0366.

NVCOG does not make any warranty or representation, expressed or implied, regarding the compost bins and rain barrels offered for sale by BrandBuilders, LLC. Purchasers must direct any questions, claims, or disputes regarding their purchase to BrandBuilders, LLC. Purchases that are not picked up at the scheduled pick-up date may be donated and used for educational purposes.

HydroLand Kinneytown Dam Fish Passage

**NEW** On September 30, 2021, NVCOG, Save the Sound and the Naugatuck River Revival Group jointly took formal legal action asking FERC to revoke the License Exemption held by Hydroland for Kinneytown Dam. A Press Release explained the filing.  

An ineffective fish ladder at Kinneytown Dam in Seymour, owned by HydroLand, is currently preventing migratory fish from accessing miles of restored habitat upstream. NVCOG has joined the Naugatuck River Restoration Coalition with the goal of returning migratory fish to the Naugatuck by ensuring that safe, timely and effective fish passage is established at Kinneytown Dam. The Coalition has developed an Interactive Story Map to explain the issue. 

Kinneytown Dam and Fish Ladder
Kinneytown Dam and Fish Ladder, Seymour, CT

As a hydroelectric generating facility, Kinneytown Dam is regulated by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC).  As part of the facility’s license exemption, Hydroland must provide for safe, timely and effective fish passage at the dam.  FERC opened a docket in Fall of 2020 in response to a letter from the US Fish and Wildlife Service documenting inadequate fish passage at the facility.  NVCOG is participating in the docket to ensure that regional and municipal voices are heard by regulators. 

Hydroland, HydroLand, HydroLand Omega, Hydroland Inc, Hydroland Corp, Hydroland Corporation, 

Explore the Issue:

This interactive storymap details the effort to restore migratory fish to the Naugatuck River, and the current issues at Kinneytown Dam keeping fish from miles of restored habitat upstream.

More Information:

Let the Naugatuck River Run Silver Again Op-Ed by John Waldman published in Hearst Media publications 12/4/2020

 

Staff Contact:

Aaron Budris
Senior Regional Planner
abudris@nvcogct.gov

Route 34 Main Street Derby Reconstruction

Status of Project:Cars driving on Route 34 in Derby

The Final Design plans are currently under review and the bidding for construction will take place by the end of summer 2021.

Introduction: Route 34 exists as a primary artery through much of the lower valley and operates as a key connection between the downtowns of Shelton and Derby. Route 34 further exists as the ‘Main Street’ for Derby. This has been a major design consideration with regard to the rehabilitation of the roadway. The reconstruction project of Route 34 from Bridge Street to the Route 8 interchange was initiated to combat congestion along this stretch of road.  Secondary to this is the understanding that as the City’s ‘Main Street’ the design team needs to remain cognizant of the needs to facilitate and encourage a roadway that creates a vibrant, walkable, and visually pleasing mixed-use place.

Designer: Luchs Consulting Engineers, LLC/DeCarlo& Doll Inc. The project is being managed by NVCOG under the supervision of the Connecticut Department of Transportation.

Summary of Project: Main Street in Derby will be reconstructed between Bridge Street and Route 8. The project includes widening to create two through lanes in each direction separated by a center median, with dedicated turning lanes at intersections, improvements to traffic signals including the interconnect of the signals to improve traffic flow, improvements to parking including on-street parallel parking on both the north and south sides of Main Street and a separate parking lot on the south side of Main Street across from the Derby Senior Center with roughly 30 to 35 parking spaces,  an upgraded storm drainage system, new sidewalks with bump-outs at intersections, lighting and other streetscape features such as trees, granite curbing, and brick paver areas. Improvements will be made to Elizabeth Street, Minerva Street, Water Street, and Factory Street. Elizabeth, Minerva, and Thirds Streets will be converted to one-way circulation. Traffic will travel north on Minerva and south on Elizabeth. Angled on-street parking will be implemented on Minerva Street. Parallel on-street parking will be maintained on Elizabeth. Parallel on-street parking will be implemented on Third Street. Pedestrians will have refuge islands mid-way as they cross Main St. Sanitary sewer improvements will also be incorporated into the project.

 This plan from 2016  depicts the cycle track along the south side of Main Street, since the time this drawing was created changes were made based on input from the public which removes the cycle track and creates on-street parking along the south side of Main Street.

Aerial Visualization includes the cycle track which has now been removed from the project resulting from public input. Parking along the south side of Main Street will be added.

Staff Contact:

Karen Svetz, P.E.
Regional Transportation Engineer
ksvetz@nvcogct.gov

Route 34 Preliminary Design Rendering

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